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An Abundance of Sears Homes in Annapolis!

April 7th, 2010 Sears Homes 3 comments

What a surprise to find an abundance of Sears Homes in Annapolis Maryland! It’d be interesting to know how and why this Navy town ended up with so many kit homes.

A picture’s worth a thousand words, so here are a few pictures of my “finds” in Annapolis. Note: All of the homes pictured below were found within the city limits of Annapolis, MD.

What is a Sears Home?  In short, these were houses purchased out of the Sears Roebuck mail-order catalog. They were shipped to the rail station in 12,000 pieces (including a 75-page instruction book) and assembled by the aspiring homeowner. About 70,000 Sears homes were sold from 1908-1940.

To read about the Montgomery Ward kit homes in Annapolis, click here.

To read a recently published article on the Sears Homes of Annapolis, click here.

The Sears Newcastle was a Colonial Revival and a popular design

The Sears Newcastle was a Colonial Revival and a popular design

Sears Newcastle sitting pretty in Annapolis

Sears Newcastle sitting pretty in Annapolis

The Sears Hamilton was a modest, but a big seller for Sears.

The Sears Hamilton was a modest, but a big seller for Sears.

Odds are, the owners of this Sears Hamilton have no idea that they have a historically significant home, and no idea how much theyve diminished its historic value with insensitive remodeling.

Odds are, the owners of this Sears Hamilton have no idea that they have a historically significant home, and no idea that its historic value has been diminished with insensitive remodeling.

The unusual rooflines on the Sears Jeanette is its best distinguishing feature.

The unusual rooflines on the Sears Jeanette is its best distinguishing feature.

This little Jeanette has a photographer standing in its front yard!

This little Jeanette has a photographer standing in its front yard!

A bungalow from the Golden West the Osborn was another very popular house. This one is on a corner lot in Annapolis.

A "bungalow from the Golden West" the Osborn was another very popular house.

This Osborn sits on a corner lot in Annapolis.

This Osborn sits on a corner lot in Annapolis.

Originally known as The Windsor, this little house was later renamed The Carlin. By any name, its still a cutie-pie!

Originally known as The Windsor, this little house was later renamed "The Carlin." By any name, it's still a cutie-pie!

Here it is, in the flesh, on a dead-end street in Annapolis.

Here it is, in the flesh, on a dead-end street in Annapolis.

Perhaps one of their top ten most popular designs, the Sears Crescent was offered in two floor plans, with an expandable attic option in both plans.

Perhaps one of their top ten most popular designs, the Sears Crescent was offered in two floor plans, with an expandable attic option in both plans.

From the 1919 Sears catalog, heres a view of the Crescents interior.

From the 1919 Sears catalog, here's a view of the Crescent's interior.

Sears Crescent with its expanded attic!  The dormers were probably added in later years, after the home was built.

Sears Crescent with its expanded attic! The dormers were probably added in later years, after the home was built.

The most notable feature on the Americus (shown here from the 1925 catalog) was the oversized front porch roof, unique front columns and the second floor front wall that juts out a little from the first.

The most notable feature on the Americus (shown here from the 1925 catalog) was the oversized front porch roof, unique front columns and the second floor front wall that juts out a little from the first.

I found this Americus in an upscale neighborhood. This Americus has been supersized. Judging by the homes placement on the lot, its likely that this house was a custom design and was built with the extra square footage.

I found this Americus in an upscale neighborhood. This Americus has been "supersized." Judging by the home's placement on the lot, it's likely that this house was a "custom design" and was built with the extra square footage.

To learn more about how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book (and get it inscribed!), click here.

To contact Rose, leave a comment below!

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