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And The Plat Thickens, Part II

October 11th, 2011 Sears Homes 6 comments

To read a fun update on this story, click here.

Mark Hardin (fellow researcher and old house aficionado) has observed something (again), that I casually overlooked. But after thinking about this for 24 hours, I think he’s right.

That happens a lot.

David Spriggs, Mark Hardin, Rachel Shoemaker and I have been scouring cities (via google maps) looking for Ethels, our pet name for these distinctive little bungalows that have been found in several Dupont towns. We’ve found them in Butte, Montana and Norfolk, Virginia (where they were probably moved from Penniman, Virginia), and Dupont Washington. (Actually, it was Mark that found them in Dupont, WA and Butte, MT.)

This summer, I thought I’d found one in Muskogee, but as Mark Hardin obseved, it’s not a spot-on match to the rest of our Ethels. Secondly, we can’t find any evidence of a Dupont presence anywhere nearby, and that’s an important fact.

On the bedroom side of our Ethels, it’s one window for the bedroom, bath, bedroom. On the Musky House, there’s an extra window on that last bedroom. A window by itself isn’t a big deal, but this window adds some length to the house, making it a more spacious house.

On the Musky’s front, it’s got a door beside the window, whereas our Ethels have a door on the sidewall of the front porch, and it appears to have a significantly wider foot print.

More info is needed, because I think Mark might be right. This house in Muskogee is very close, but it’s not a perfect match.

Eth

This is the Ethel in Muskogee, Oklahoma in the 900-block of Boston Avenue. It is a close match to our other Ethels, but it's a little wider. (Photo is courtesy of Angeline Stacy and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. )


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Another view of our Ethel in Muskogee. You'll note the windows are all boarded up. Not a good sign. Angeline reports that this neighborhood was "a little scary." (Photo is courtesy of Angeline Stacy and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. )

And thanks to Mark Mckillop, we have many photos of the houses in Dupont, Washington.


Our Ethel Bungalow in Dupont, Washington. All photos are courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Our "Ethel Bungalow" in Dupont, Washington. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This Dupont Ethel is in largely original condition. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

I wish Mark had taken his chain saw with him. Landscaping is always a problem when photographing old houses. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This Ethel in Dupont has seen a little modification. Vinyl siding is not a friend of old houses. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This is such a distinctive little house. Have you seen it in your neighborhood? (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Next are the photos of our Ethels, which art in Norfolk. As you’ll see from the photos below, they really are a good match to the houses in Dupont, Washington and Muskogee, OK.

House

One of our mystery bungalows on 51st Street. Photo is courtesy of David Spriggs and may not be reused or reprinted without permission from David Spriggs.

Another

Good shot of the two bungalows on 51st Street. This photo is courtesy of David Spriggs and may not be reused or reprinted without permission from David Sprggs.

house

This is one of the houses in Riverview that's in mostly original condition. The little dormer on the side was added in later years.

Close-up of railing

Close-up of railing

Close-up of dormer

This dormer window is a pretty distinctive feature.

another Ethel

Another "Ethel Bungalow" in Riverview

Aladdin promoted itself to companies as a supplier of industrial housing. It was believed that providing housing for workers created a more stable workforce. And that was probably true.

Aladdin promoted itself to companies as a supplier of industrial housing. It was believed that if a company provided housing for its employees, this would create a more stable workforce. And that was probably true. Dupont turned to Aladdin to supply homes for Hopewell, Virginia and Carney Point, New Jersey and Old Hickory, TN. (1919 Aladdin catalog)

To read an update on this interesting story, click here.

To read what we learned about the Ethels at Penniman, click here.

To contact Rose, please leave a comment below.

To learn more about the kit homes in Norfolk, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

* * *

And The Plat Thickens…

October 8th, 2011 Sears Homes 5 comments

Updated! To read the latest, click here!

Here in Norfolk, we have a real mystery on our hands. There are 16 little bungalows (which we’ve lovingly named, “The Ethel”) that were originally built at another location (don’t know where), and then moved to Norfolk by George P. Hudson on April 14, 1922.*

There’s an elderly Norfolk resident who remembers seeing a photo of one of the houses being moved into Riverview (Norfolk neighborhood). He says the photo showed the small house being pulled up the road by a team of mules. How we’d love to find *that* photo!

Several months ago, we learned that 3,000 miles away (in Dupont, Washington), there are dozens of identical bungalows, built by Dupont for the dynamite factory in Fall 1909. Thanks to Mark Mckillop, we have photos of the Dupont Ethels (shown below).

Dozens. That’s a lot of “Ethels.”

And then old-house lover and researcher Mark Hardin found another neighborhood of these “Ethel Bungalows” in a little village just outside of Butte, Montana. (It was Mark who found the houses in Dupont, too.)

That neighborhood also has a large collection of Ethels.

And more recently, an Ethel has been found (and photographed) in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

Was Muskogee a Dupont town? If not, was there an industrial complex that sprang up in the early 1900s, that needed housing for their workers?

I’d love to know.

So, our Ethel Bunaglow in Norfolk (which came from somewhere else) is a spot-on match to the company houses in Dupont, Washington, Butte, Montana, and Muskogee, Oklahoma and who knows where else.

To read more about what we’ve learned thus far, read Part Five of this ongoing story.

Despite what we’ve learned, many unanswered questions remain. What’s the source of this “Ethel” design? Did they come from Aladdin? I don’t think so, because I’ve searched my collection of early 1900s Aladdin catalogs, and there’s nothing even close.

Are they pattern book houses? If not, where did DuPont get this design? Why are these houses popping up in several of Dupont’s neighborhoods? And where did the houses in Norfolk come from?

If you’ve any information to contribute, please post a note in the comment’s section below!


Eth

This Ethel is located in Muskogee, Oklahoma in the 900-block of Boston Avenue. It is a very close match to our other Ethels. The most significant difference is the placement of the front door. (Photo is courtesy of Angeline Stacy and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. )



house

Another view of our Ethel in Muskogee. You'll note the windows are all boarded up. Not a good sign. Angeline reports that this neighborhood was "a little scary." (Photo is courtesy of Angeline Stacy and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. )



Close-up of that disinctive dormer window

Close-up of that disinctive dormer window. (Photo is courtesy of Angeline Stacy and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. )


And thanks to Mark Mckillop, we have many photos of the houses in Dupont, Washington.


Our Ethel Bungalow in Dupont, Washington. All photos are courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Our "Ethel Bungalow" in Dupont, Washington. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This Dupont Ethel is in largely original condition. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

I wish Mark had taken his chain saw with him. Landscaping is always a problem when photographing old houses. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This Ethel in Dupont has seen a little modification. Vinyl siding is not a friend of old houses. (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Ethel

This is such a distinctive little house. Have you seen it in your neighborhood? (This photo is courtesy of Mark Mckillop and may not be reproduced without written permission.)

Next are the photos of our Ethels, which art in Norfolk. As you’ll see from the photos below, they really are a good match to the houses in Dupont, Washington and Muskogee, OK.

House

One of our mystery bungalows on 51st Street. Photo is courtesy of David Spriggs and may not be reused or reprinted without permission from David Spriggs.

Another

Good shot of the two bungalows on 51st Street. This photo is courtesy of David Spriggs and may not be reused or reprinted without permission from David Sprggs.

house

This is one of the houses in Riverview that's in mostly original condition. The little dormer on the side was added in later years.

Close-up of railing

Close-up of railing

Close-up of dormer

This dormer window is a pretty distinctive feature.

another Ethel

Another "Ethel Bungalow" in Riverview

Aladdin promoted itself to companies as a supplier of industrial housing. It was believed that providing housing for workers created a more stable workforce. And that was probably true.

Aladdin promoted itself to companies as a supplier of industrial housing. It was believed that if a company provided housing for its employees, this would create a more stable workforce. And that was probably true. Dupont turned to Aladdin to supply homes for Hopewell, Virginia and Carney Point, New Jersey and Old Hickory, TN. (1919 Aladdin catalog)

If you’d like to read earlier posts, start with Part I.

And then go to Part II.

Part III.

Part IV.

Part V.

Part VI.

Part VII.

Part VIII.

To learn more about the kit homes in Norfolk, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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Of Pipes and Men…

October 7th, 2011 Sears Homes 5 comments

Tomorrow morning, my husband of five years is going to get in his 12-mpg Ford F-150 truck and drive to Richmond (about 90 miles away) to attend a smoker’s convention. He’s very excited about this.

From what I understand, large numbers of tobacco-laden men will gather at this event, stand around and sit around and smoke pipes and talk about smoking pipes. Occasionally, someone might say, “I need to buy a new pipe,” and the others will agree, and then they’ll sit around and talk about their most recently purchased pipes or their favorite pipes.

My husband has a large collection of pipes. I do not understand the appeal and I do not understand pipes, but if I liked pipes, this one would be my favorite.

Now if I could just find him a little hat with horns and a human skull on top…

A man and his pipe

The pipe bears a stunning resemblance to its smoker.

To learn more aboout Sears Homes, click here.

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Teddy, the Amazing Watch Dog!

October 7th, 2011 Sears Homes 3 comments

It was about 11:45 pm on a Thursday night when Teddy walked over to my side of the bed, stuck her snout next to mine, and gave me one loud “Woof.”

I opened my eyes and said, “What?” (as if she would answer). With an unmistakable intensity, she looked me right in the eye and repeated herself:  “Woof!”

Usually when there’s another dog outside, she’ll bark a bit and then settle down. If there’s someone walking down the city sidewalk, she’ll bark a little and then stop. But this was different.

I looked into her eyes for a minute and I swear I heard her say, “Listen, you need to get out of that bed and look outside. This isn’t just a random ‘woof’. This one’s important.”

She did not leave her station at the side of my bed but continued to stare intensely at me. I arose from my soft pink bed and toddled outside to the second-floor balcony just outside my bedroom. I looked outside and saw two highly questionable people studying my car, which was parked on the street. One was especially interested in the license plate. The other was leaning over and looking in the driver’s window.

The dog followed me out to the balcony and stood out there and barked. I was trying to figure out if I should yell or call 911, but Teddy’s barking was enough. They immediately stood upright and walked away.

Back in the bedroom, I thanked Teddy and gave her some praise. As I settled back under the covers, I said a little prayer of gratitude for her perspicacity. And I wondered, “How did she know? And how did she know how to get my attention with that little staring maneuver? How could she hear those silent people out there, preparing to mess with my red Camry?”

One of my favorite books is Kinship with All Life and its premise is that dogs are a lot smarter and a lot more intuitive and a lot more attuned to feelings and emotions that we humans can ever understand or appreciate.

The morning after the incident with the miscreants, I praised Teddy to the moon and stars. And that afternoon, she went outside and dug a hole in the middle of my freshly planted St. Augustine grass. Guess she didn’t want me to think she was the World’s Most Perfect Puppy.

This happened about two years ago, and we’ve since moved to another area, but Teddy still keeps a watchful eye over our property. These days, those “intruders” are mostly ducks and geese and racoons and muskrats - and the occasional snake.

She’ll be three years old this month, and she’s been a lot of fun in those three years. Best of all, I’ve never heard her voice one complaint about anything. She really is a good dog, a good companion and a trust-worthy friend.

To learn about the amazing collection of Sears Homes in Hampton Roads, click here.


Teddy the Dog watches over her Sheepie on a Saturday afternoon.

Teddy the Dog watches over her Sheepie on a Saturday afternoon.

Teddy looks regal.

Teddy re-enacts her "watchful pose" at a local park.

Cute puppy, but she was incredibly ill-behaved as a child. Fortunately, she grew up to be a good dog.

"Theodora Duncan Doughnuts Ringer" was a real cutie-pie, but she was incredibly ill-behaved as a child. Fortunately, she grew up to be a very good dog. She's shown here at about eight weeks old, being cuddled by her adoptive daddy.

In this remarkable photo of baby Teddy, she inadvertantly shows off her incredible

Teddy shows here that she not only knows how to "speak duck," but she is mimicking the duck's facial expressions as well.

Ted

Teddy the Amazing Watch Dog.

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A Kenmore House - by Montgomery Ward!

October 5th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

Sears started selling kit homes in 1908. Montgomery Ward followed suit in 1909.

Sears started offering financing (mortgages) on their kit homes in 1917. Montgomery Ward reluctantly began offering mortgages in 1925.

In 1931, Montgomery Ward saw the writing on the wall and got out of the kit home business. Sears followed suit in 1934 (but re-entered the game in 1935, and closed down the kit home business once and for all in 1940).

Sears and Wards had a lot in common.

One night, I was going through the pages of my 1927 Wardway Homes catalog and found that one of Montgomery Ward’s modest little houses was named, “The Kenmore.”

Interesting name for a Montgomery Ward product!

Was the #2 mail-order giant poking a stick in the eye of the #1 mail-order giant?

What I do know is, Sears first used the brand name “Kenmore” in 1913 for one of their better-quality, portable sewing machines. It sold for $6.75 (including cabinet-grade wooden cover).

Six years later, the Kenmore name disappeared from the Sears catalogs and didn’t reappear until 1934.

Who knows why Ward’s chose the name Kenmore for one of their most-modest kit homes. However, it’s now an interesting little footnote in the history of American merchandising history and kit homes.

To learn more about Wardway Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

The Montgomery Ward Kenmore (1927)

earlier

1910s Wardway catalog. Note the "possible changes" offered.

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Above is the floor plan for the Wards "Kenmore." Pretty modest little house. That rear bedroom is a mere seven feet wide. Today, we'd call that a walk-in closet.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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The Prettiest Little Sears Homes You Ever Did See (in the Chicago Suburbs)

October 4th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

In early 2009, The History Press contacted me and asked me to write a book about the Sears Homes of Illinois.

For more than three weeks, I traveled throughout Illinois, documenting and photographing the Sears Homes from Cairo to Chicago.

My adventure began in early February 2010, when I took the Amtrak to Chicago (from Charlottesville) and the Metra to Elgin, where I met up with Rebecca Hunter in Elgin. For three whole days, Rebecca drove me throughout the northern Illinois suburbs, helping me photograph these amazing Sears Homes. For three whole days, Rebecca allowed me to stay in her home, too!

To learn more about Rebecca, click here. Thanks wholly to Dr. Rebecca Hunter, more than 200 Sears homes have been identified in Elgin. By the way, this makes Elgin the city with the largest known collection of Sears Homes in the country - not Carlinville (as is often misreported).

To learn more about the Sears Homes in Elgin, visit the Gail Borden Public Library in Elgin, and check out The Elgin Illinois Sears House Research Project (by Rebecca Hunter). This book is also available for interlibrary loan within the state of Illinois. You can also visit Dr. Hunter’s website at www.kithouse.org.

By the way, if you like what you see, please share the link with others!  :)

To read more about the Sears Homes in the Midwest, click here.

The Sears Normandy: A very rare kit home!

The Sears Normandy: A very rare kit home!

The only Normandy Ive ever seen was in Elmhurst, and  its a pretty one!

The only Normandy I've ever seen was in Elmhurst, and it's a pretty one!

Sears Princeville, as seen in the 1919 cataog.

Sears Princeville, as seen in the 1919 cataog.

Sears Princeville in West Charles.

Sears Princeville in West Chicago, with an enclosed porch.

Another Sears Princeville, and this one is in St. Charles.

Another Sears Princeville, and this one is in St. Charles. Notice, it's been slightly remodeled. I would never have identified this as a Sears House, but Rebecca found it using grantor records. It is a confirmed Princeville, based on old mortgage records. Rest in peace, poor little Princeville. I'm sure you were a beauty back in the day.

An especially odd-looking duck, the #124 didnt last long enough to be granted a name. In 1918, Sears Homes were given names (instead of numbers).

An especially odd-looking duck, the #124 didn't last long enough to be granted a name. In 1918, Sears Homes were given names (instead of numbers).

S

Looking much like it did when built in 1916, this house is in Crystal Lake.

From the 1928 catalog, the Solace was a fairly popular house, but those original pergola ends (front porch) rarely survive the decades.

From the 1928 catalog, the Solace was a fairly popular house, but those original pergola ends (front porch) rarely survive the decades.

This little Solace is in Wheaton.

This little Solace is in Wheaton. Those three windows on the side (descending in size) always catch my eye. A small, clipped-gable dormer was added to this Solace.

Searss Newbury, from the 1936 cataog.

Searss Newbury, from the 1936 cataog.

This Newbury is in Elmhurst, and its a spot-on match to the catalog page.

This Newbury is in Elmhurst, and it's a spot-on match to the catalog page.

Sears Lexington from a late 1920s Sears catalog.

Sears Lexington from a late 1920s Sears catalog.

Sears Lexington in Glen Ellyn, IL

Sears Lexington in Glen Ellyn, IL. Notice the oversized cornice returns, and also that goofy placement of the window/door on the second floor balcony. Very unusual feature.

Sears Hathaway from the 1921 catalog.

Sears Hathaway from the 1921 catalog.

Sears Hathawaay in Elmhurst. This is another very rare house. I dont think Ive seen five in 10 years.

Sears Hathawaay in Elmhurst. This is another very rare house. I don't think I've seen five in 10 years.

Columbine

Columbine, from 1921.

This Columbine in Wheaton has had several changes, but fortunately, the remodelings and additions have been done in a sensitive, thoughtful way.

This Columbine in Wheaton has had several changes, but fortunately, the remodelings and additions have been done in a sensitive, thoughtful way.


A bungalow from the Golden West the Osborn was another very popular house. This one is on a corner lot in Annapolis.

A "bungalow from the Golden West" the Osborn was another very popular house. This picture from the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog also shows interior views of The Osborn.

Sears Osborn in St. Charles, Illinois

Sears Osborn in St. Charles, Illinois (next door to the Princeville, above).

The Sears Newcastle was a Colonial Revival and a popular design

The Sears Newcastle was a Colonial Revival and a popular design

Sears Newcastle in northern Illinois

Sears Newcastle in Geneva, Illinois

Sears Matoka, another popular Sears Homes

Sears Matoka, another popular Sears Homes

Sears Matoka in St. Charles

Sears Matoka in St. Charles

Sears Fullerton

Sears Fullerton

Sears Fullerton in Aurora, Illinois

Sears Fullerton in Aurora, Illinois

Sears Fullerton in Elgin, Illinois

Sears Fullerton in Elgin, Illinois

Sears Del Rey

Sears Del Rey

Sears Del Rey in Wheaton, Illinois

Sears Del Rey in Wheaton, Illinois

Sears Marina, Model #2024

Sears Marina, Model #2024

Sears Marina (2024) in West Chicago

Sears Marina (2024) in Geneva, Illinois

The Sears Hamilton was a modest, but a big seller for Sears.

The Sears Hamilton was a modest, but a big seller for Sears.

Sears Hamilton in Elgin, IL

Sears Hamilton in Elgin, IL

Perhaps one of their top ten most popular designs, the Sears Crescent was offered in two floor plans, with an expandable attic option in both plans.

Perhaps one of their top ten most popular designs, the Sears Crescent was offered in two floor plans, with an expandable attic option in both plans.

Crescent in Elmhurst, IL

Significantly remodeled Crescent in Elmhurst, IL

The most notable feature on the Americus (shown here from the 1925 catalog) was the oversized front porch roof, unique front columns and the second floor front wall that juts out a little from the first.

The most notable feature on the Americus (shown here from the 1925 catalog) was the oversized front porch roof, unique front columns and the second floor front wall that juts out a little from the first.

Sears Americus in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

Sears Americus in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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Pine Knot: Teddy’s Rustic Retreat (in Virginia)

October 3rd, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

When I originally posted this blog, I misidentified the retreat as Pine Knob.

The indefatigable researcher (and old house aficionado) Mark Hardin sent me an email and said, “The name is not Pine Knob, but Pine Knot,” and he also sent me a link that contains much contemporary information about the place, including an address!

This early 20th Century version of Camp David is located at 711 Coles Rolling Road, Keene, Virginia.  According to that website, the 15-acre farm was purchased by Edith Roosevelt (Teddy’s wife) from the estate of William Wilmer, and included a fairly new “worker’s cottage,” which would become their first couple’s little love nest.

It was Edith that named the property, “Pine Knot,” and it was Edith that hired workers to do a little upgrading to the property (although it’s hard to imagine what these “upgrades” could have been).

Total cost of renovations and property: $280.

The website states, “After their first visit there together in June 1905, Teddy Roosevelt wrote to one of his sons, ‘Mother is a great deal more pleased with it than any child with any toy I ever saw.’”

Edith and Teddy’s retreat is (and was) extremely  primitive, lacking indoor plumbing and electricity.

The amazing story of this “new” retreat first appeared in the Spring 1906 issue of American Carpenter and Builder. The article included photos about the new presidential retreat, built for president Theodore Roosevelt (26th president, 1901-1909).

This amazing piece in American Carpenter and Builder also included photos of the staff, and they were a pretty rugged looking group.

To learn more about life in the early 1900s, click here.

To read about Addie Hoyt, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

To read part II of this piece (and see more photos), click here.

Exterior of the Presidential Retreat.

Exterior of the Presidential Retreat. I don't think this would have ever made the cover of "Homes Beautiful."

Interior of the retreat. Note the wood-burning stove.

Interior of the "retreat." Note the wood-burning stove and very primitive furnishings.

The staff is fairly rustic, too.

The staff is fairly rustic, too.

Close-up of the crew at Pine Knob

Close-up of the staff at Pine Knob

Another close-up

Another close-up

Last of three slices of the original photo.

Last of three slices of the original photo.

Original article as it appeared in the 1906 American Carpenter and Builder magazine.

Original article as it appeared in the 1906 American Carpenter and Builder magazine.

part 2 of the original article

part 2 of the original article

And part 3

And part 3

part 4

part 4

And I found this in the December 1905 New York Times.

Whos Kermit?

And I always thought Kermit was a made-up name for a frog!

Part II of this story is here.

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

* * *

All Settled In…

October 2nd, 2011 Sears Homes 4 comments

Yesterday, October 1st, was our housewarming party and we had about 35 of our friends and relatives show up, which was 100% delightful.

We closed on the old house on Wednesday, August 14th and the following day, we closed on our “new” house, a 1962 brick ranch.

It took us a solid six weeks to get “settled in” to our new house, and even now, we’re still missing several boxes! (Not sure where they ended up.)

In preparation for our big housewarming party, we worked for hours and hours cleaning and scrubbing and tidying up and painting walls and washing windows. We worked for days and days trying to get the yard prettied up, and had help from one of the world’s best neighbors, who gave up three hours of his life weeding and mowing and raking.

And it was all worth it.

While I had the house all prettied up, I decided it was an ideal time to take some photos.

Enjoy the photographic tour of our beautiful brick ranch!  :)

house

Our house in Norfolk.

house

Not a big flower bed, but keeping it pretty takes some work!

pagoda

At our old house (on Gosnold), we had a big fancy pergola. And this house, we have a cute little pagoda. Pergola, pagoda - pretty close trade.

house

This brick ranch is almost 80 feet wide. It's tough to get a good shot straight on. Notice the shrub on the far right that I pruned? It's look a little barren these days, but it was way, way too tall. I like big plants, but not when they interfere with my electricity!

house

The picket fence was recently added to contain the wild beast in the back yard.

Teddy

Here, Teddy is demonstrating that she knows how to open the gate (which has no latch on the inside), and is merely "choosing" to remain contained in the spacious back yard.

And what a fine back yard it is.

And what a fine back yard it is.

house

And Wayne has it all set up for our house-warming party!

house

Another view.

den

Many of our guests said that the den was their favorite room.

den

The bricks in the fireplace came from an old house in Norfolk that was torn down in the early 1960s. The home's original (and only) owner (Mr. Martin) worked for the Norfolk Redevelopment and Housing Authority.

den

Mr. Martin had these bookcases put in when the house was built.

den

This light is not only handy, but a delightful piece of early 1960s Americana.

house

And we've added a few accouterments to our 1960s house, such as this vintage cigarette lighter. Lighter fluid was stored in the bowl, and when you withdrew the rod, a spark was ignited which lit off the wick at the end of the rod.

clock

Another piece of 1950s Americana: An old wall clock.

licinf

An anachronistic living room: A 1960s ranch with 1980s carpet and 1920s Arts and Crafts furniture and a 21st Century La-Z-Boy.

mb

My mother gave me this quilt about 15 years ago, and it's always been one of my favorite possessions. I painted the room to match the comforter. The master bedroom (shown above) was the same size as the master bedroom at our old house (on Gosnold), but we couldn't fit the same amount of furniture in the new bedroom. Perhaps it was because of all the windows and doors at the new house.

v

The guest room also serves as my hide-away. Very quiet at this end of the house. And very pink. I really like pink.

his

The man cave.

All

Our long hallway provides a perfect gallery for family photos!

pink

One of the top five most perfect bathrooms in North America.

The mans room

As with the pink bathroom, all the tile in the master bathroom is in top-notch condition.

trimBack in May 2011, when I first read the listing info on this house and saw that (according to the realtor’s comments), the house needed “some updating,” I knew I’d found something special. The house was custom built in 1962 and had only one owner (The Martin family), and it’s evident that they really did love this house. Even the formica countertop was in flawless condition. The kitchen is 49 years old, and still looks shiny and new and beautiful. I love the look of 1962.
trim

Detail on the unique trim molding in the kitchen.

sun

When we first walked into the sunporch, it was pretty smelly. The house had been closed up for a time and there were several issues on the sunporch. This was the first room we started working on, and it took about six weeks, but eventually, we got it all done. We removed the green indoor/outdoor carpet, washed and sanitized the floor, removed the ceiling fan (low ceiling height), and then painted everything. Each window had a storm window that had to be removed for painting and cleaning. Many, many years ago, the walls, ceiling, trim and windows had all been painted YELLOW. Our new paint job (pink and white) required two coats, but when it was all done, it was stunning!

sun

The new and improved sunporch, looking transformed. And the windows are so clean and pretty! It is a grand and glorious room.

f

Bev and Mike brought us these gardenias as a house-warming present. They were grown from cuttings off two beautiful gardenia plants I'd purchased from Bev, three years prior. It'll be a real treat to watch "The Twins" take root and grow at their new home.

party

Mr. Ringer was tired at the end of the day.

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

To read about Addie, click here.

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