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The Dandy Amsterdam!

The Sears Magnolia was their biggest, fanciest home, but the Sears Amsterdam was a close second.  The Magnolia had 2,880 square feet of living area, and the Amsterdam was only 300 square feet behind, at 2552. Heretofore, we’ve found seven Magnolias in the country, and yet I’ve never seen one Amsterdam. The one shown below came from a photo sent by Melody Snyder. This house is in Pittsburgh, PA.

If you’ve seen an Amsterdam in your town, please send me a photo! I suspect these houses weren’t that rare, but more likely, folks have not really been looking for them! Of the 70,000 Sears kit homes in the country, probably fewer than 20% have been identified as such. In general, about 90% of the people living in these Sears Houses didn’t know what they had until I knocked on their door and told them.

To learn more about how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

The Amsterdam, as seen in the 1928 Sears catalog.

The Amsterdam, as seen in the 1928 Sears catalog.

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First

And it has a music room (and a half-bath) on the first floor!

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Look at that floorplan! Very spacious.

Look at that floorplan! Very spacious.

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The Amsterdam - in brick!

The Amsterdam - in brick! This house is in Pittsburgh, PA. (Photo is copyright 2011 Melody Snyder and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And from the side...

And from the side, you can see a little piece of that staircase bumpout on the back of the house. (Photo is copyright 2011 Melody Snyder and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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One common feature found in many Sears Homes is this plinth block. The simple block made it easier for homeowners to deal with complex joinery (such as is found at staircase landings). Photo is copyright 2011 Catarina Banner and cannot be used or reproduced without written permission.)

One common feature found in many Sears Homes is this plinth block. The simple block made it easier for homeowners to deal with complex joinery (such as is found at staircase landings). Photo is copyright 2011 Catarina Banner and cannot be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Marked lumber is another way

Marked lumber is another clue that tells you, it may be a kit home. On Sears Homes, the mark is a three-digit number and a letter (as is shown on this floor joist).

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To learn more, click here.

  1. glenn wallace
    December 8th, 2013 at 15:33 | #1

    I live in an original 13196a (that’s the number on my support beam). I have picture. I do not know how to send you a picture. I would like to know more!

  2. Jim Holder
    October 25th, 2015 at 16:13 | #2

    This is an Amsterdam model I am considering purchasing in New Castle, Delaware.

    http://www.zillow.com/homedetails/507-S-Dupont-Hwy-New-Castle-DE-19720/72915595_zpid/

  3. October 26th, 2015 at 08:31 | #3

    Whoa, Jim - that is a dandy Amsterdam you’ve found there!

    Are you going to buy it? It’s a real beauty!

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