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Archive for April, 2012

The Roseberry, by Sears

April 17th, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

When I was a little girl, my mother and I would often watch “Star Trek” together on television, and when the credits rolled at the end, the name “Gene Roddenberry” appeared (as creator, writer and producer). My mother would often tell me, “That’s the man you should marry: Gene Roddenberry. And then your name would be Rosemary Roddenberry. Plus, I bet that guy’s a lot of fun.”

My beloved mother passed on before my first books on Sears Homes were published, but had she been aware of these little houses, I suspect she would have told me, “You should change your last name to Roddenberry, and then buy a Sears Roseberry, and then you’d be Rosemary Roddenberry living in a Roseberry.”

She sure was a lot of fun.

The Sears Roseberry is a cute little house, but apparently, it wasn’t too popular. I’ve only seen one Sears Roseberry outside of Carlinville, IL (which has a large collection of Sears Homes, built by Standard Oil), and that lone Roseberry was in the Milton section of Alton, Illinois.

Sears Roseberry as seen in the 1916 catalog.

Sears Roseberry as seen in the 1916 catalog.

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Five years later (1921), the Roseberrys ad had changed very little. .

Five years later (1921), the Roseberry's price had doubled.

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As you can see from the floorplan, it is pretty small.

As you can see from the floorplan, it's not a big house.

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This vintage photo of Carlinville (1920) shows a Roseberry

This vintage photo of Carlinville (1920) shows a Roseberry under construction.

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Rose

One of 150 Sears Homes in a 12-block area, this Roseberry sits in Carlinville. There were eight models built by Standard Oil (for their employees), and the Roseberry is one of them.

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Some of the Roseberrys in Carlinville are in a little bit of pain, and need a little love.

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And some of them are in a lot of pain...

And some of them are in a lot of pain, and need a lot of love.

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The Roseberrys in Carlinville have two large windows in that gabled dormer, whereas the Roseberrys in the catalog image have one big window flanked by two smaller windows.  None of the houses in Carlinville are a perfect match to the catalog image. Perhaps Standard Oil didnt want the houses to look just like the catalog, so they made this one change on the Roseberry.

The Roseberrys in Carlinville have two large windows in that gabled dormer, whereas the Roseberrys in the catalog image have one big window flanked by two smaller windows. None of the Roseberrys in Carlinville are a perfect match to the catalog image. Perhaps Standard Oil didn't want the houses to look "just like the catalog," so they made this one change on the Roseberry.

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To learn more about Carlinville and Standard Oil, click here.

To see more vintage pictures of Carlinville, click here.

The Sears Homes of Beautiful Roanoke, Virginia

April 15th, 2012 Sears Homes 5 comments

In the 1960s, my family would make the long trek from Portsmouth (Virginia) to Douthat State Park for our once-a-year vacation.

Ever since I first laid eyes on Douthat (in Clifton Forge) and the Blue Ridge Mountain area, I have been head-over-heels in love. In 1994, my husband and I decided to move to the Lynchburg/Roanoke area, but you know what they say about the “best-laid plans of men.”

We overshot the mountains and ended up living in St. Louis for 12 years. (Long story.) In 2006, I moved back to Hampton Roads and that’s been my home since then.

One day, I will get to the mountains. One day.

In the meantime, I’ll simply admire the mountains “from afar.”

Below are several kit homes that I’ve found in Roanoke (with a lot of help from my dear friend Dale Wolicki).

What were kit homes? These were 12,000-piece kits, sold out of the Sears Roebuck catalog in the early 1900s. Sears promised that “a man of average abilities” could have one of these kits built in 90 days.

Click here to learn more about Sears Homes.

Click here to buy Rose’s latest book on Sears Homes.

A picture of my brother Tom Fuller at Douthat in 1960.

A picture of my brother (Tom Fuller) at Douthat (Clifton Forge) in 1960.

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First, one of my favorite houses in Roanoke: The Sears Alhambra!

First, one of my favorite houses in Roanoke: The Sears Alhambra!

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And here it is, in all its shining splendor: The Sears Alhambra

And here it is, in all its shining splendor: The Sears Alhambra. I wonder if the owners know that they have a Sears House? And this one is in wonderful condition!

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Another beautiful Sears House is the Americus.

Another beautiful Sears House is the Americus.

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And its right there in Roanoke! What a sweet-looking Americus!

And it's right there in Roanoke! What a sweet-looking Americus!

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The Sears Fullerton was another big and beautiful house.

The Sears Fullerton was another big and beautiful house.

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This Fullerton (on Rugby Avenue) had a porte cochere added.

This Fullerton (on Rugby Avenue) had a porte cochere added.

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In addition to Sears, Roanoke has kit homes from several other national kit home companies, such as Montgomery Ward, Harris Brothers, Sterling and Aladdin. Heres a picture of the Aladdin Sheffield as seen in the 1919 catalog.

In addition to Sears, Roanoke has kit homes from several other national kit home companies, such as Montgomery Ward, Harris Brothers, Sterling and Aladdin. Here's a picture of the Aladdin Sheffield as seen in the 1919 catalog.

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This beautiful Sheridan (offered by Aladdin Kit Homes of Bay City, MI) is on Berkley Street in Roanoke.

This beautiful Sheridan (offered by Aladdin Kit Homes of Bay City, MI) is on Berkley Street in Roanoke. Notice the oversized dormers and the bumped-out vestibule.

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The Marsden was another very popular house for Aladdin.

The Marsden was another very popular house for Aladdin.

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nice

Unfortunately, between the landscaping and the truck, it's tough to see, but there's no doubt that that's an Aladdin Marsden hidden away back there.

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And from the front.

And from the front.

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The Inverness was a very rare house, and Ive never seen one anywhere - but in Roanoke.

The Inverness (offered by Aladdin) was a very rare house, and I've never seen one anywhere - but in Roanoke. Notice the many angles on the roofline!

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Is this an Inverness? If so, its been supersized.

Is this an Inverness? If so, it's been supersized. It certainly is a good match.

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The Aladdin Detroit, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

The Aladdin Detroit, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

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And heres a near-perfect match!

An Aladdin Detroit - in brick!

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The Aladdin Florence was a hugely popular house for Aladdin.

The Aladdin Florence was a hugely popular house for Aladdin.

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This Aladdin Florence on Hunt Avenue

This Aladdin Florence on Hunt Avenue is a good match to the original catalog picture.

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As mentioned above, in addition to kit homes from Aladdin, Roanoke also has kit homes from Montgomery Ward.

As mentioned above, in addition to kit homes from Aladdin, Roanoke also has kit homes from Montgomery Ward.

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Heres a sweet little Mayflower in Roanoke.

A Mayflower in Roanoke. This photo was taken four years ago, so this house may have changed a bit since then. Looks a little rough around the edges here.

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In addition to Sears, Aladdin and Montgomery Ward, Roanoke also has houses sold by Sterling Homes (Bay City, MI). Pictured is the Sterling Rembrandt, from the early 1920s catalog.

In addition to Sears, Aladdin and Montgomery Ward, Roanoke also has houses sold by Sterling Homes (Bay City, MI). Pictured is the Sterling Rembrandt, from the early 1920s catalog.

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A sweet Dutch Colonial: The Sterling Rembrandt!

A sweet Dutch Colonial: The Sterling Rembrandt!

To learn more about how to identify kit homes, click here.

Want to learn more about Wardway Homes? Click here!

To read about the Sears Homes in Clifton Forge, click here.

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Makes Its Owners Proud: The Argyle

April 13th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

Probably one of their top-ten best selling models, the Sears Argyle was a quality home in countless ways, but in a very compact package. It was a mere 1,008-square-feet of house, and yet it had a myriad of fine features such as wainscoting topped with plate-rail in the dining room, beamed ceilings in the living room, with bookcase colonnades between the dining and living rooms.

Cabinetry in the colonnades and built-in-bookcases by the fireplace featured leaded-glass doors.

In 1919, it was offered for $1,479 and was an exceptional value (even in 1919 dollars).

In 1916, the Argyle was offered for

In 1916, the Argyle was offered fora mere $881.

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By 1920, the price had jumped a bit to $1,479.

By 1920, the price had jumped a bit to $1,479.

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Living room

Notice the wainscoting in the dining room, topped with plate rail. Pretty fancy!

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The living room is equally fancy.

The living room is equally fancy. Notice the leaded glass in the built-in cabinetry.

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And from the 1916 catalog.

The Argyle bedroom, as seen in the 1921 catalog.

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And the bathroom...

And the bathroom (as seen in the 1921 catalog).

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full page

The Argyle, as featured in the 1921 catalog.

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Argyle

Were there any "unhappy" Argyle owners? I hope not! (1921 catalog)

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It was a busy little house, but well laid out (1921).

It was a busy little house, but well laid out (1921). Notice how the porch floor extends a little bit beyond the primary wall? That is a very distinctive feature, and makes it easier to identify the Sears Argyle.

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The Argyle, as seen in the 1920 catalog.

The Argyle, as seen in the 1920 catalog.

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A *perfect* Sears Argyle in New Baden, IL.

A *perfect* Sears Argyle in New Baden, IL.

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Another near-perfect Argyle in Nampa, Idaho.

Another near-perfect Argyle in Nampa, Idaho.

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A nice, but neglected Argyle in Townsend, Virginia (Eastern Shore).

A nice, but neglected Argyle in Townsend, Virginia (Eastern Shore).

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Not surprisingly, little Cairo Illinois has an abundance of Sears kit homes, including a couple Argyles. There was a mill at Cairo, dedicated to turning trees into kit homes.

Not surprisingly, little Cairo Illinois has an abundance of Sears kit homes, including a couple Argyles. There was a mill at Cairo, dedicated to turning trees into kit homes. As is typical of most Argyles, the two closet windows are missing down this side. These often get covered up, or done away it. The advent of lights in every nook and cranny made closet windows unnecessary.

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Awesome Argyle in Raleigh, NC.

Awesome Argyle in Raleigh, NC.

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Pretty little Argyle in a not-so-pretty part of Norfolk, VA.

Pretty little Argyle in a not-so-pretty part of Norfolk, VA.

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One of the most screwed-up Argyles in the world. This house is located in an unnamed city in Illinois.

One of the most screwed-up Argyles in the world. This house is located in an unnamed city in Illinois.

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Argyle in Ocean View (Norfolk, VA).

Argyle in Ocean View (Norfolk, VA).

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Roanoke Rapids (North Carolina) is stuffed full of Aladdin Kit Homes. In fact, they have more than 50 Aladdin Homes in one small section of town. However, they also have a few Sears Homes, such as this Argyle.

Roanoke Rapids (North Carolina) is stuffed full of Aladdin Kit Homes. In fact, they have more than 50 Aladdin Homes in one small section of town. However, they also have a few Sears Homes, such as this Argyle.

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Icky Argyle in Wood River, Illinois.

Icky Argyle in Wood River, Illinois.

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And one more Argyle in Raleigh, NC.

And one more Argyle in Raleigh, NC.

To learn more about Sears kit homes, click here.

To learn about how to identify them, click here.

To learn about the family member that I had exhumed, click here.

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The Niota: 1200 Square Feet For $942

April 12th, 2012 Sears Homes 1 comment

Not a bad deal to buy 1,200 square feet of kit house for less than $1,000, even in 1916!

The Sears Niota - despite its being a good value and a cute house - was not a popular model for Sears.  And yet, according to a small promotional ad that appeared in the 1916 catalog, the Niota had been built in Elmhurst, IN, Westerville, Ohio, Indianapolis, IN, Napleton, MN and Springfield, MO.

And in Wood River, Illinois, too.

The house was offered in StoneKote, which was Sears own stucco-type covering. As with most of the kit homes, buyers could opt for stucco, block, brick, stone or wood. Today, way too many of these homes are now covered with substitute sidings (such as aluminum or vinyl), which makes identification even more difficult.

To read more about the many Sears Homes in Wood River (and Amoco), click here.

Niota

One might hope that those columns are a unique feature to help in identifying the Sears Niota, and yet sometimes, they get removed (1916 catalog).

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Niota catalog 1916

The kitchen was so small you'd have to step out to the porch to change your mind. Lots of rooms on this first floor, and they're all pretty modest.

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niota fp

At least the bedrooms have closets. That's a plus.

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niota

Close-up of the Sears Niota.

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niota wood river

And here it is, in Wood River, Illinois. Notice that those unique columns have been chopped off at the roofline and also covered in that hideous house-hiding PVC material, known as "vinyl siding." The original columns - poking through the porch ceiling as they did - were probably prone to roof leaks and all manner of maintenance problems.

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Niota more

Niotas were built in several places in the Midwest. It'd be fun to see pictures of these Niotas.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn more about my Aunt Addie, click here.

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Modern Home #194: Brighton, Illinois

April 11th, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

When I started giving lectures in southwestern Illinois, several people approached me after the talks and said, “You know, there’s a Sears Home on East Center Street in Brighton.”

So many times I drove the length of East Center Street and never saw anything that looked remotely like a Sears House. And so many times I went home and studied Houses by Mail trying desperately to figure out if any of the houses in that field guide matched any houses on East Center Street.

I’ve since learned that 80%, people who think they have a Sears kit home are wrong. Often it turns out to be a kit home from another company, but in 2002, when I was still memorizing the 370 designs offered by Sears, I wasn’t equipped or prepared to figure out if this was something OTHER than a Sears House.

Finally, one day someone gave me a specific address. That helped - a whole lot.

I snapped a photo of the house form several angles and then sat down with my pictures and Houses by Mail and this time, I was not going to give up until I figured this out.

Lo and behold, I found my house. It was a modest little thing, but there it was: Sears Modern Home #194. It had been altered and added onto, but there was no doubt that this was a Sears kit home.

Once I discover and identify a Sears House “in the flesh,” I’ll never miss another one. Seeing these houses in 3-D helps me remember all their architectural nuances. And yet, despite that, I have never seen another #194, or  its close cousins, #193 and #196.

To read about the Sears Kit Homes of Ohio, click here.

To read about the Sears homes I found in Raleigh, NC click here.

To see a short video about my sweet aunt that was killed by her not-so-sweet husband, click here.

Sears Modern Home #193, 194 and 195 (1912)

Sears Modern Home #193, 194 and 195 (1912)

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Floor plan

This house is so small they don't even have room to spell out the word "pantry" on the floor plan. Maybe it's an abbreviation for the word "paltry"?

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Flor plan 2

The second floor shows the smallest bath in the world.

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house

Not a bad-looking little house.

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house

It's been added onto (quite a bit) and someone placed an exterior door to the cellar stairs (which is a good idea anyway), and it's been clad in the ugly garb of vinyl siding, but this is unmistakeably Modern Home #194.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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The Kit Homes of Raleigh, NC

April 10th, 2012 Sears Homes 4 comments

In May 2012, I gave a talk at the Rialto Theatre (in Raleigh) on Sears Kit Homes, sponsored in part by the Raleigh Historic Development Commission and the Raleigh City Museum.

Raleigh has an abundance of kit homes, which I find fascinating. In addition to Sears, they also have kit homes from Aladdin (based in Bay City), Harris Brothers (Chicago), Sterling Homes (Bay City), and even Montgomery Ward (Chicago).

Scroll on down to see some of the kit homes that I found.

And to read another blog I did on Raleigh, click here.

To read about Raleigh’s museum exhibit on Sears Homes, click here.

To listen to Rose’s interview on WUNC, click here.

First, one of my favorite finds: The Sears Winona (1921 catalog).

First, one of my favorite finds: The Sears Winona (1921 catalog).

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Perfect in every detail. Just perfect. What a treasure.

Perfect in every detail. Just perfect. What a treasure.

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Another wonderful Sears House: The Westly (1919 catalog).

Another wonderful Sears House: The Westly (1919 catalog).

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This Westly in Raleigh is perfect in every detail. Wow.

This Westly in Raleigh is perfect in every detail. Wow. Original railings, too.

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The Sears Whitehall (1916 catalog).

The Sears Whitehall (1916 catalog).

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Another Raleigh Sears House thats been thoughtfully maintained.

Another Raleigh Sears House that's been thoughtfully maintained.

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And theres this oh

And there's this a Harris Brother's kit home, too. Notice the rounded front porch.

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Known as Model 1000, this was one of their most popular homes.

Known as Model 1000, this was one of their most popular homes.

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Another favorite is the Modern Home #163 (1916 catalog).

Another favorite is the Modern Home #163 (1916 catalog).

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Be still my quivering heart - what a match!

Be still my quivering heart - what a match!

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This was a home sold by Sterling Homes in Bay City (1932 catalog).

This was a home sold by "Sterling Homes" in Bay City (1932 catalog).

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Another fine match! What a cutie!

Another fine match! What a cutie!

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Another remarkable find is the Sears Avalone - a classic Arts & Crafts bungalow.

Another remarkable find is the Sears Avalone - a classic Arts & Crafts bungalow.

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And here it is in all its original splendor.

And here it is in all its original splendor. Look at the detail around the porch columns. WOW! And it retains its original siding and casement windows! Double WOW!!!

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Close-up of those wonderful casement windows.

Close-up of those wonderful casement windows on the Avalon.

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And another favorite house found in Raleigh was the Americus (1928).

And another favorite house found in Raleigh was the Americus (1928).

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Again, its in perfectly original condition. Raleigh = Sears House Heaven.

Again, it's in perfectly original condition. Raleigh = Sears House Heaven.

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Sears Argyle (1919 catalog).

Sears Argyle (1919 catalog).

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Sears

This is a classic Sears Argyle with a little bonus: The attic was pitched a little more steeply to create extra space. That was a common "improvement" for these little houses.

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And another Argyle, also in beautiful shape.

And another Argyle, also in beautiful shape. Notice how the porch deck extends a little beyond the exterior wall of the house. This is a classic feature of the Sears Argyle.

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The biggest fanciest house that Sears offered was the Magnolia.

The biggest fanciest house that Sears offered was the Magnolia.

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And theres a *beautiful* Sears Magnolia in Benson, NC (near Raleigh).

And there's a *beautiful* Sears Magnolia in Benson, NC (near Raleigh).

And if you’re near Raleigh, don’t forget to visit nearby Roanoke Rapids. They have a town literally filled with Aladdin (kit homes). Click here to learn more about Roanoke Rapids.

And there’s also Rocky Mount, which has an abundance of kit homes.

To read about Addie Hoyt, click here!

See you on the 19th of May!

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A Rare Bird: The Sears Vallonia in Original Condition

April 9th, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

There’s a Sears Vallonia in Washington, DC that’s on the market - kind of - but according to local Realtors, they’re having a tough time getting inside the house to show it. I thought I’d help them out by providing a few interior photos of a *real* Vallonia!

These are amongst my favorite photos (slides, actually), because they show a 1928-built Sears Vallonia in original condition - as of 2001. That’s when Rebecca Hunter and I had a chance to tour the inside of this remarkable house in Columbia, Illinois.

As of 2001, one of the home’s original owners and builders (yep, that’s right), had passed on a couple years prior.

Sadly, I’ve forgotten the name of the original homeowner, but she and her husband built the house in 1928, and years after the husband passed on, his widow lived there until her death. When we saw the house, not only was it in original condition, but it was in beautiful shape - as the pictures will show.

So if those folks in DC want to know what their Vallonia looks like on the inside, they can just scroll on down to see the interior of the Vallonia in Columbia, Illinois.

If you want to buy a Sears Vallonia in DC (or any Sears House), click here.

To learn more about kit homes in DC, click here.

From the 1925 Sears Modern Homes Catalog: The Vallonia

From the 1925 Sears Modern Homes Catalog: The Vallonia

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Check out the interiors, as shown in the 1928 catalog.

Check out the interiors, as shown in the 1928 catalog.

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Close-up of the original Vallonia bathroom

Close-up of the original Vallonia bathroom

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And here it is, as of 2001. Notice the floor tile, which is probably original to the house.

And here it is, as of 2001. Notice the floor tile, which is probably original to the house. I wish I'd gotten a photo of that medicine chest! But these are the original plumbing fixtures. And see what a good match they are to the 1928 image above!!

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The bath

And the Vallonia bath tub

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The original

And the original "pedestal" tub.

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The kitchen, as seen in 1928.

The kitchen, as seen in 1928.

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And heres the kitchen in 2001.

And here's the kitchen in 2001. The sink is a spot-on match.

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The original dining room.

The original dining room.

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The dining room in the Columbia Vallonia

The dining room in the Columbia Vallonia

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And original light fixtures throughout.

And original light fixtures throughout.

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The bedroom

The living room - as seen in 1928.

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And the bedroom.

And the bedroom.

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The folks in Columbia loved their Sears Homes so much, they turned the risers and treads wrong-side-out, so people would always remember, theirs was a Sears kit home.

The folks in Columbia loved their Sears Homes so much, they turned the risers and treads wrong-side-out (with numbers exposed), so people would always remember, theirs was a Sears kit home. Each riser and tread - all the way up - showed the marked lumber.

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The Sears Vallonia

The Sears Vallonia

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And here it is in 2001.

And here it is in 2001.

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Side by side comparison

Side by side comparison

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To learn more about kit homes, click here.

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“The Betsy Ross,” by Sears

April 8th, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

Of the 370 models that Sears offered, 107 Sears Homes were named after cities in Illinois. A few others were named after famous figures in American history, such as the Martha Washington and the Betsy Ross.

The Martha Washington was a massive two-story Dutch Colonial. The Betsy Ross was a diminutive bungalow with a single bedroom. Seems a little unfair for a widow woman who joined the “Fighting Quakers” and made our first flag during the American Revolutionary War.

In 1928, the Betsy Ross was an “Honor Bilt” home, but in prior years, it was a “Standard Bilt” house, meaning it not an especially sturdy house. To learn more about the differences between Honor-Bilt and Standard Bilt, click here.

The fact that it was offered for years as a Standard Bilt house may explain why it’s such a rare model. Standard Bilt homes were not likely to survive these many decades.

In my travels, I’ve only seen two examples of the Betsy Ross: One in Elgin (which Rebecca Hunter found), and one in Effingham, Illinois.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

1928 Betsy

The Betsy Ross was a pretty modest little house, and as built, had only one bedroom (with a closet-less dining room that could be used as a second bedroom).

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Betsy Ross

Betsy Ross had a fairly complicated floorplan for such a little house. The dining room is oddly positioned for a "dining room." As a second bedroom, it made much more sense.

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house

Notice the cut-out shutters (with clover leaf) and details on the front porch gable.

Elgin, IL

Rebecca Hunter has authenticated this Betsy Ross in Elgin, Illinois. Notice the "spokes" in the front porch gable. This porch has gable returns, while the original Betsy Ross does not, and yet this house (in Elgin) is most certainly the real deal. Notice also the original shutters and flower boxes.

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Betsy Ross

Betsy Ross- the details

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To learn how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

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The Sears Castleton: A Four-Bedroom Four-Square

April 6th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

The Sears Castleton is fairly easy to identify because it has a number of distinctive features. The most distinctive feature is that “hanging bay window” on the side, which extends up to the roofline. That’s something you don’t see too often.

On the red Sears Castleton (shown below), it has the classic Castleton dormer with three windows, and the hipped dormer comes right off the ridge of the primary roofline. That’s also a unique feature.

Sears

Sears Castleton as seen in the 1916 catalog.

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Sears Cat

This Castleton in Peoria, Illinois does not have the Castelton porch columns, but rather has the traditional Sears porch columns found on the Sears Woodland.

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Sears

This Castleton had the tradition Castleton columns, but has a different dormer! (Aurora, IL)

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Flor

As is typical of four-squares, it has four rooms on the four corners of the house, but look at the size of the "den"!

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Sears

The front bedroom is a mere 7'7" wide. Pretty darn tiny.

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To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn more about Wardway Homes, click here.

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A House Built of Honest Material: Sears Modern Home #123

April 5th, 2012 Sears Homes 1 comment

Reading the old Sears Modern Home catalogs is wholly delightful, and there are times that the idioms of the day make it a little bit challenging. Sears Modern Home #123 was promoted as being “a house built of honest material.”

Makes you wonder what “dishonest material” looks like.

In fact, it was an allusion to the fact that all the materials you’d need to complete your house would arrive - as promised - when you purchased your Sears Modern Home. You wouldn’t be shorted 10-feet of lumber or five pounds of nails, but you’d have a whole kit, lacking nothing.

Recently, Cindy Catanzaro found a Sears Modern Home #123 in Springfield, Ohio and was kind enough to share her photos with me. This is one of those Sears Homes that I’ve never seen “in the flesh” so this is pretty exciting to see photos of a #123.

In the 1908 catalog, this house was offered for $2,585 and yet two years later, in 1910, the price had dropped by more than half to $1,132.

To learn more about how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

Sears Modern Home #123 (1908 catalog).

Sears Modern Home #123 (1908 catalog).

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Same house as shown in the 1910 catalog.

Same house as shown in the 1910 catalog. Look at the difference in price.

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Spac

As you can see from the floor plan, this was a very spacious house.

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It was a spaceious

The front bedroom was 21 x 14, which was unusually large for a house of this vintage. And there was a rear staircase off the back bedroom, which is also a pretty interesting feature.

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Close-up of #123 from the 1910 catalog.

Close-up of #123 from the 1910 catalog.

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The House That Cindy Found, in Springfield.

The House That Cindy Found, in Springfield. It's a perfect match to the house shown in the catalog picture (except for the TV antenna). (Photo is copyright 2012 Cindy Catanzaro and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Another view of #123.

Another view of #123. The small sash window on the front is a remnant of the large window that was originally placed where the large plate glass window is now, by the porch swing. (Photo is copyright 2012 Cindy Catanzaro and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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To read more about Sears Homes, click here.