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Modern Home #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia

Last week, I posted photos of Sears Modern Home #124 in different parts of the country. Rachel Shoemaker then discovered that there was another “Model 124” in Lincolnton, Georgia and she sent me a link with a photo.

I sent a couple inquiries out, asking if anyone near Lincolnton could get some photos for me. Steve and Teresa Howland responded and said, “Sounds like a fun project. We’ll get a photo for you!”

And then yesterday, after I returned home from my five-day trek to North Carolina, I found a plethora of beautiful photos in my email, courtesy of Steve and Teresa Howland.

As I’ve always said, all the nicest people love old houses and history.  :)

And these are wonderful photos!

To read the previous blog about Sears Modern Home #124, click here.

To hear Rose’s recent interview on WUNC (with Frank Stasio), click here.

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

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The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty!

The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty! And look at how even the brick chimneys are a perfect match! Most likely, the Ionic columns were not original to the house, but are replacements. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And our view

This photo really shows off that dramatic overhang on the third-floor. I'm not sure why anyone would design a house with this feature. Is there a tangible benefit or was this done for appearance's sake? Because it's a pretty odd feature! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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As I said, these photos are wonderful! Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia.

Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And looking straight on!

And looking straight on! I think this is her best angle! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Awesome details around the door!

Awesome details around the door. I am still puzzled by those columns. Are they wood or cement? They're pretty substantial looking. The bracing on the underside of the eaves was not original to the house. These were often added to support the oversized eaves, which sometimes sag with age. Who among us doesn't understand the angst of having our once-sturdy eaves start to sag a bit? (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Look at the details!

Look at the details! I'm not sure what the purpose of that little hole was, but it's an interesting little feature. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Wow!

Wow! Now that's a good match!! And a beautiful photo, too! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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So, there are more of these!  Do I have any readers in these cities?  :)

So, there are more of these! Do I have any readers in these cities? :)

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And last but not least, a heart-felt thank you to Steve and Teresa Howland for driving out to Lincolnton, Georgia and taking the time to get such wonderful photos!  As is evidenced by the last photo above, they did a first-rate job in getting the angle just right, so it’s a perfect match to the original catalog page!

Thanks Steve and Teresa!

To learn more about kit homes, click here.

To read another blog that showcases another “random act of old house kindness,” click here.

To listen to my favorite “Georgia” song, click here.

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  1. Rachel Shoemaker
    May 20th, 2012 at 07:06 | #1

    Awesome! Thanks to the Howlands for getting these photographs. Maybe they will catch the fever now. Finding these houses is addictive! :)

  2. Leah Konicki
    May 20th, 2012 at 09:44 | #2

    It is wonderful how old houses can bring people together! Thanks to the Howlands for documenting this house so thoroughly - a picture can be worth more than 1000 words.

  3. Jan
    May 20th, 2012 at 17:10 | #3

    So this house has an “enclosed” porch on the second floor under that roof-line? If so it is certainly very hidden and I would think it wouldn’t be very useful.

  4. May 20th, 2012 at 18:09 | #4

    @Jan
    Jan, I don’t think it is a second floor porch. I think it’s just a funky-looking overhang! :)

  5. May 22nd, 2012 at 15:19 | #5

    This is such a very beautiful home. Very beautiful photos!

  6. Helen Newland
    September 1st, 2013 at 12:07 | #6

    This was my grandparents’ house! Helen and Doc Turner. It is such a beautiful house.

    I’m amazed at how my grandmother cooked huge Thanksgiving meals in that tiny little kitchen.

    Thank you for researching and posting about it!

  7. Dr. LeAnn O’Neill
    August 20th, 2014 at 00:56 | #7

    So glad I stumbled upon this. Lincolnton, GA is my hometown, and I was always fascinated by the fact that you could order a HOUSE (!) from Sears!

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