Thanks to Rachel Shoemaker, I have a fun update to this blog!  Click here to see it!

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Years ago, Rebecca Hunter told me that there had been a Magnolia in Lincoln, Nebraska (one of only eight known Sears Magnolias in the country) that had been destroyed by fire in 1985 or 1986.

And for years, all we’d ever seen was a grainy picture (a copy of a copy of a copy), but today, thanks to the foresight and wisdom of the architectural historians at the Nebraska State Historical Society, I got my first look at an amazing kit house that has been gone for almost 30 years.

The house was extensively photographed a few months before it was razed. And  there just aren’t words to express how delighted and grateful I am to see this almost-forgotten Sears house, from all angles (as shown below) and also from the inside.

If you’re a regular visitor to this site, you probably know all about the Sears Magnolia. If not, you can learn about it by clicking here, here and here.  My favorite blog on the Magnolia is this one, which tells the story of a 92-year-old builder who remembers helping build a Magnolia.

Thanks so much to the wonderful folks at the Nebraska State Historical Society for having the presence of mind to document this wonderful old house before it was razed, and so generously sharing these wonderful photos with me, three decades later.

Looking at these photos took my breath away. It’s so tragic that the house is gone, but at least we can get a good look at our “Maggy,” and remember, this was a house that someone carefully selected from the pages of a Sears Roebuck catalog and then painstakingly erected, more than nine decades ago.

Enjoy the plethora of photos.

All photos below are courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Sears Magnolia was featured on the cover of the 1918 catalog.

The Sears Magnolia was featured on the cover of the 1918 catalog.

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The Magnolia  was the crème de la crème of  all kit homes.

The Magnolia was the crème de la crème of all kit homes (1920).

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And thanks to the foresight of theh

And thanks to the foresight of the Nebraska State Historical Society, we have some wonderful photos of the Sears Magnolia that was located at 5901 NW 20th Street in Lincoln, Nebraska. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Class

The classic entry of the Magnolia, as seen in 1985. The two-story Corinthian columns were made of poplar and judging from the photo above, they were in pretty rough shape here. It was said that all of the Sears kit homes could be made to fit intto a single boxcar with one exception: The Magnolia. It required two boxcars for shipping. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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An imposing view of an imposing house.

An imposing view of an imposing house. Look at the eaves and brackets, as well as the balustrades on the 2nd floor porch and porch roof. In 1985, when these photos were taken, the house was only 60 years old. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another

Didn't I tell you these were wonderful photos? Everything about this house was original, down to the exterior wooden storm door on the 2nd floor porch. Notice the leaded glass fan lite over the front door. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Side view

From this side view, you can see a bit of that unique dormer in the attic. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Straight on

A view of our Maggy from straight on. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The trees obstruct the frontal view, but you can still see those unique front windows. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The sun porch is missing its railings. Still, it's a great view of the side of the house. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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hoouse house house

Another great photograph showing the porte cochere. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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There was a balcony on the rear of this Magnolia, probably off the staircase landing. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The upstairs rear corner (shown above) had a spacious "sleeping porch." Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Magnolia was on a massive lot, and was apparently on the edge of Lincoln. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Close-up of the side. Note the original screen doors off the porte cochere. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Even in this sad state, its grandeur still shone through. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The home's cypress exterior put up a good fight. I wonder if the house was ever re-painted after it was built (1918-1922). Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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fireplace

And my favorite part: Thee interior photos. Judging from these pictures, it appears that all the oak trim retained its natural finish and had not been covered in latex paint (a fate suffered by most older homes). Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house house

As I pointed out to a friend, these photos are great, but also a little bittersweet. This house was magnificent inside, and now it's gone. Nonetheless, I'm so grateful to have these pictures. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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living

Another view of the living room. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And a great photo of the Magnolia's entry hall. The living room was to the right and the dining room was to the left. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Close-up of the staircase. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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See those double-doors at the top of the stairs? They lead to that small balcony at the back of the house. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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kitchen

How awesome is this? The kitchen, probably looking much like it did when built in the early 1920s. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Den

Judging by the presence of this fireplace, this is probably the den of the Magnolia. The fireplace has a coal-burning grate. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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fireplace

And the top of the stairs, showing that small balcony. Photo is courtesy Nebraska State Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Please share this link with your old-house loving friends, and perhaps we can find the 9th Magnolia (and maybe the 10th, 11th and so on!).

To learn more about the Sears Magnolia, click here.

Thanks again to the Nebraska State Historical Society for having the presence of mind to document this wonderful old house before it was razed, and so generously sharing these wonderful photos with me, three decades later.

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