Figuring  out how many of the old Penniman houses were shipped to Norfolk has been a challenge. In addition to the many “DuPont Designs” found at Old Hickory (Tennessee), we’ve been finding additional designs at other DuPont plants around the country.

And last month, I purchased “DuPont: One Hundred and Forty Years” (Dutton, William S., Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1951), and found this:

DuPont Engineering Company was operating a shell-loading plant at Penniman, Virginia…and it was operating plants for the bag-loading of cannon powder at Tullytown, Pennsylvania and at Seven Pines, Virginia, all vitally important projects” (p. 247).

Took me and the hubby a few minutes to figure out that Seven Pines, Virginia was now Sandston. And my heart sank a little when I learned that Sandston is also the site of the current Richmond Airport.

Colleges and hospitals are notorious bungalow eaters. Only one corporate entity is worse: Airports.

On Saturday, as Milton and I were returning from the Virginia Historical Society (in Richmond) we saw the Sandston exit off I-64. I couldn’t help but take the exit into the small town of 7,500 people (2010 Census). And there in Sandston we found many examples of our DuPont houses.

However, I suspect that dozens (or more) were torn down when the airport was built. In fact, uncharacteristically, they apparently tore down the big fancy DuPont models and left an abundance of the modest “Six-Room Bungalows” (and yes, that was their official name).

Surely there are some vintage photos of Sandston (pre-airport) somewhere in the world. If so, I’d love to find them. Because based on our 30-minute visit to this town, there is at least one never-before-seen DuPont model present in Sandston that we’ve not seen in any other DuPont towns.

And I’m also wondering if the residents of Sandston know much about the history of their many pre-WW1 bungalows.

Lastly, it’s a puzzle as to why DuPont had so many munitions plants in such a small area of Virginia. There were munitions plants at Penniman, Hopewell and Sandston (then Seven Pines). At least Hopewell and Sandston got to keep a few of their old DuPont houses.

To  learn more about Penniman, click here.

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One of finer homes in the DuPont line was the Arlington.

One of "finer" homes in the DuPont line was the Arlington. This house was built at Carney's Point, NJ, Old Hickory, TN and probably at Penniman as well.

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To the typical McMansion buyer, this may look like small potatoes, but for industrial housing, this was high living.

To the typical McMansion buyer, this may look like small potatoes, but for "industrial housing," this was high living. Typically, these homes were for the supervisors of the plant.

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Arlington

This Arlington looks darn good considering that it was built as industrial housing in 1916.

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Another Arlington in Sandston.

Another Arlington in Sandston. This one is in beautifully original condition.

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The Haskell was also present at

The Haskell was also present at Carney's Point, NJ, Hopewell, Penniman and Sandston.

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This was not a very wide house.

This was not a very wide house. In fact, it appears to have been about 20' wide.

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This is a sideways Haskell in Willoughby Spit (Norfolk). It was moved here in the early 1920s - from Penniman.

This is a "sideways" Haskell in Willoughby Spit (Norfolk). It was moved here in the early 1920s - from Penniman. It's not a very big house.

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There are several of these houses in Sandston. Too wide to be a Haskell and too narrow for the Arlington. Ive dubbed it a Baby Arlington.

There are several of these houses in Sandston. Too wide to be a Haskell and too narrow for the Arlington. I've dubbed it a "Baby Arlington."

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Another Baby Arlington

Another "Baby Arlington"

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And yet another.

And yet another.

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Another DuPont model at Sandston is The Ketcham.

Another DuPont model at Sandston is The Ketcham.

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Dupon

The windows have been replaced in this old DuPont house, but it's still readily identifiable as a "Ketcham."

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Dupont kit

I'd just love to know if the homeowners know about the unique history of their old house.

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Ketcham Number Three, in Sandston, Virginia.

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But hands down, the #1  most prevalent house found in Sandston is the

But hands down, the #1 most prevalent house found in Sandston is the"Six Room Bungalow."

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And

And they are everywhere in Sandston. In the last 97 years, they've undergone all manner of renovation.

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Some

Some are mostly original.

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Some

Some have had been thoughtfully added on to.

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Some

Some look like quite modern and tidy.

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Some

Some are barely recognizable as one of DuPont's "Six Room Bungalows."

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Some

Some have had a rough time of it.

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What happened to the big fancy modes there in Sandston?

What happened to the big fancy DuPont models that were almost surely there in Sandston?

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house

Were they reduced to rubble when the airport was built?

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Mark Hardin found this in Sandston. Very interesting marker, but is it right? The 230 houses

Mark Hardin discovered this plaque for Sandston, Virginia. Very interesting marker, but is it right? The "230 Aladdin Houses" are (apparently) the DuPont houses. In Penniman, Virginia and DuPont, Washington, E. I. DuPont Nemours contracted with local business to build these company houses. Did they use a different approach in Sandston? Photo is copyright Leon Reed, 2010.

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