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Gordon Van Tine #611: Unusually Well Planned

These last few months, I’ve been doing a proper survey of kit homes in Hampton, Virginia. I went out yesterday to check one last section one last time (which I’ve now visited twice), when this handsome bungalow jumped out of the bushes and called my name.

This Gordon Van Tine Model #611 is on a main drag (300-block of North Mallory) which leaves me scratching my head. How did I miss it?

That will remain one of the great mysteries of the universe, together with, where did I put my husband’s truck keys.

To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

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Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

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One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

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What a house!

Notice how the porch roof sits within the primary roof. Interesting feature.

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Oh yeah, baby! :D

Sadly, some vinyl siding salesman has pillaged the house, but other than that, it's a nice match. The railings have been replaced, but that's a relatively minor affair.

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Good match on this side, too!

Good match on this side, too!

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So

And did I mention it's on the main drag? :)

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To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

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  1. April 3rd, 2015 at 20:53 | #1

    I think that’s right, Judith.

  2. Shari D
    April 8th, 2015 at 02:37 | #2

    In so many if these type plans, I find the front bedroom being turned into an impromptu hallway by putting in a doorway from the living room across from a doorway to the hallway proper.

    Even when there is already a path through the dining room that parallels it, like in this design.

    Personally, I have always considered that little “feature” annoying, and sucking up a great deal of otherwise usable space in both the living room and the bedroom, not only with the opening in the wall, but also with the “swing space” for the door that must also be there.

    I wonder how many other folks felt the same, and either closed it off without a door at all when the house was built, or perhaps in later years when other owners did renovations or updates?

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