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Posts Tagged ‘aladdin brentwood’

Aladdin Kit Homes - Build Your Own

May 5th, 2015 Sears Homes 6 comments

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No profound and loquacious blogs today: Just a very cool advertisement from 1915.

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But whats really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

But what's really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

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And zoom in just a bit more...

And zoom in just a bit more...

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To read about the Aladdin Carnation (shown above on the left), click here.

To learn more about the Aladdins in Roanoke Rapids, click here.

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“My Brentwood is the Admiration of the Town”

August 18th, 2013 Sears Homes 6 comments

In terms of actual sales numbers of kit homes, Aladdin was actually a bigger company than Sears, but these many years later, they’re not as well known. “Sears Homes” is to kit homes what Kleenex is to disposable tissues. It’s become a generic term, that is over-used and frequently wrong.

More than 80% of the people who think they live in a Sears Home are wrong, and yet the majority of these misinformed souls *do* live in a kit home, but it’s often a kit house from another company, such as Aladdin (or Gordon Van Tine, or Lewis Manufacturing, or Sterling, or Montgomery Wards).

Here in the Southeastern United States, most of our kit homes are from Aladdin, and that’s probably because of the proximity to Wilmington, NC where Aladdin had a massive mill.

One of my favorite Aladdin houses is the Brentwood. It’s a classic Arts & Crafts house with lots of flair. Best of all, it’s easy to identify because of its many unique architectural features.

Enjoy the pictures, and if you know of an Aladdin Brentwood near you, please contact me!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here or here.

Interested in learning more about Aladdin? Click here!

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Whats not to love? The Aladdin Brentwood as seen in the 1919 catalog. What a house!

What's not to love? The Aladdin Brentwood as seen in the 1919 catalog. What a house!

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Spacious

I love it that the small balcony (second floor) is not off the "master bedroom," but the "owner's room." The guy who's making the payments on this joint gets the Romeo and Juliet balcony. Darn tootin'!

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I love the last paragraph: "A Tennessee owner says, 'My Brentwood is the admiration of the town. It was ready for plastering two weeks after the first nail was driven.'" The first line of this ad also reflects this theme.

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One of my favorite Brentwoods, right here in my neck of the woods. This house is in Hampton, VA and is in stunningly beautiful condition.

One of my favorite Brentwoods, right here in my neck of the woods. This house is in Hampton, VA and is in stunningly beautiful condition. My research shows that the home's original owner was an electrician. I wonder if he built the house himself? Often tradesman would do just that.

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Another Brentwood in nearby Newport News. Sadly, this gorgeous old house is in East End, which is crime-ridden and quite unsafe. Before long, this house will probably be another footnote of our local history.

Another Brentwood in nearby Newport News. Sadly, this gorgeous old house is in East End, which is a very crime-ridden and unsafe area. Our local news is full of stories of shootings and stabbings in East End. Before long, this house will probably be another footnote of our local history.

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Back to the happy Brentwoods: Heres a beauty in Chapel Hill, NC.

Back to the happy Brentwoods: Here's a beauty in Chapel Hill, NC.

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Roanoke Rapids, NC has a massive collection of Aladdin Kit Homes, including this Brentwood.  Roano

Roanoke Rapids, NC has a massive collection of Aladdin Kit Homes, including this Brentwood.

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Scotland Neck, NC (near Roanoke Rapids) also is home to many Aladdin kit homes.

Scotland Neck, NC (near Roanoke Rapids) also is home to many Aladdin kit homes. This Brentwood needs a little love, but it's still in pretty good shape.

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Years ago, I discovered this Aladdin Brentwood in Mattoon, IL.

Years ago, I discovered this Aladdin Brentwood in Mattoon, IL. It's been rode hard and put away wet, but it's still solid and true. The hardest part about finding these classic old kit homes in the tiny towns of the Midwest is that they're often in very sad condition and/or neglected.

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The Brentwood as seen in the 1914 Aladdin catalog.

The Brentwood as seen in the 1914 Aladdin catalog.

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To learn more about Aladdin kit homes, click here.

To contact Rose, please leave a comment below.

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Paying Attention the Details: How to Identify Kit Homes

October 17th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

When comparing a vintage catalog image to that cute little Neo-Tudor in your neighborhood, it’s very important to pay attention to details. Dale and I have been staring at old houses for many decades now, and one common problem we’ve discovered is this: It’s easy to overlook the subtle features that differentiate one house from the other.

We’re both inundated with emails from folks who are sure that they have a kit home, but when we examine their photos, we find houses that are not even close to the kit homes they’re purported to be. The Wardway Parkside was a fine Tudor Revival with two front gables, but not every Tudor Revival with two front gables is going to be a Wardway Parkside.

This Wardway Parkside (in Jackson, Michigan) is a nice example because it’s such a spot-on match to the original catalog image and it’s not been remodeled. Note how all the details are right: The window arrangement, the small decorative bricked arch over the front door, the height and proportion of those two gables and the flared flooples on that front gable.

When comparing suspected kit homes with original catalog pictures, details matter!

To read more about Wardway Homes, click here.

To buy the new book on Wardway Homes, click here.

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Parkside in Jackson, MI

Photo above is courtesy of Dale Patrick Wolicki.

Dirty Smut and Shocking Wheat and Building Delays

October 12th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

In 1918, Standard Oil of Indiana made mail-order history when they placed a $1 million order with Sears Roebuck & Company for 192 Honor-Bilt homes. It was purported to be the largest order in the history of the Sears Modern Homes department. Standard Oil purchased the houses for their refinery workers in Southwestern Illinois.

Of those 192 houses, 156 went to Carlinville, 12 were built in Schoper and 24 were sent to Wood River. Throughout the 1920s, pictures of these homes were prominently featured in the front pages of the Sears Modern Homes catalogs.

Construction of the 156 houses took nine months, not six as expected. The reason? A nationwide shortage of wheat. Charles Fitzgerald, spokesman for Standard Oil and Manager of Houses explained to The Chicago Daily Tribune (November 3, 1919) what happened.

“The company (Standard Oil) purchased a forty acre wheat field and the government would not permit the destruction of the crop,” he said. “On the first home, we were erecting the studding while the harvesters were shocking wheat twenty yards away.”

According to the papers of the day, “smut” was another reason for the wheat shortage. When I first read about smut and the wheat shortage, I imagined a large group of idle field workers, sitting cross-legged in the expansive fields, poring over magazines with pictures of scantily-clad women.

Smut, I later learned, is a particularly nasty fungus that creates black, odious spores and ruins wheat crops. In 1919, smut damaged a large proportion of America’s wheat fields.

And “shocking” was another interesting term. As a city girl, I’d never heard that phrase before. “Wheat shockers” are the field workers who bundle up the wheat.

While doing research for my book The Houses that Sears Built, I read hundreds of newspaper and articles from the early 1900s and learned that there is a wholly different vernacular for that time period. Words have different meaning in different times.

One of the Sears Homes in Wood River, Illinois - part of that $1 million order that Standard Oil placed in the late 1910s.

One of the Sears Homes in Wood River, Illinois - part of that $1 million order that Standard Oil placed in the late 1910s. There are 24 of these Sears Homes in a row on 9th Street in Wood River. The 12 Sears Homes built in Schoper, Illinois were torn down in the 1930s.

Sears Homes abound in Clifton Forge, Virginia!

September 16th, 2010 Sears Homes 5 comments

In the 1960s, our family  frequently traveled from Portsmouth, VA to Douthat State Park in Clifton Forge. Ensconced by the Blue Ridge Mountains, Douthat was (and remains) one of my favorite places on earth.  We’d venture into Clifton Forge to use the laundromat and to buy supplies at the local grocery store.

Even in my childhood, I’d noticed that Clifton Forge had lots of train tracks and lots of trains coming and going.  (Today, there’s a delightful train museum in Clifton Forge - The C&O Railway Heritage Center - stuffed full of treasures and ephemera and photographs. It’s at 705 Main Street in the heart of the city.)

About 40 years after those fun family vacations in Douthat, I returned to Clifton Forge to look for Sears Homes. Take a look at what I found!

To see more pictures of Sears Homes in Virginia, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

Sears Princeville from the 1919 catalog

Sears Princeville from the 1919 catalog

Sears Princeville in Clifton Forge - and what a beauty!

Sears Princeville in Clifton Forge - and what a beauty!

Sears Woodland from 1918 catalog

Sears Woodland from 1918 catalog

Sears Fullerton!

Sears Woodland!

In all my travels, I have never seen a Model #113, until I saw it in Clifton Forge!

In all my travels, I have never seen a Model #137, until I saw it in Clifton Forge!

Landscaping prevented a better photo, but you can see one side!

Landscaping prevented a better photo, but you can see one side!

From the front

From the front

The Sears Auburn is another unusual house. This is a massive house with lots of interesting details.

The Sears Auburn is another unusual house. This is, as the catalog states, a massive house with lots of interesting details. Note the interesting brickwork on the porch, and the bracketing under the eaves.

There are many trees sitting right in front of houses in Clifton Forge. This large evergreen prevented me from taking the picture I wanted to take. Nonetheless, even from this angle, you can clearly see this is a Sears Auburn.

There are many trees sitting right in front of houses in Clifton Forge. This large evergreen prevented me from taking the picture I wanted to take. Nonetheless, even from this angle, you can clearly see this is a Sears Auburn.

Another view of the Auburn

Another view of the Auburn

Close-up of the brickwork on the front porch.

Close-up of the brickwork on the front porch.

Sears Elsmore from the 1919 catalog

Sears Elsmore from the 1919 catalog

Sears Elsmore on the main drag in Clifton Forge

Sears Elsmore on the main drag in Clifton Forge

Like Sears, Montgomery Wardd also sold kit homes. Heres a Montgomery Ward Lexington from the 1927 catalog.

Like Sears, Montgomery Wardd also sold kit homes. Here's a Montgomery Ward "Lexington" from the 1927 catalog.

And in the flesh - The Montgomery Ward Lexington in Clifton Forge!

And in the flesh - The Montgomery Ward Lexington in Clifton Forge!

Aladdin was another kit home company that, like Sears, sold kit homes through mail order. Aladdin Homes are fairly common in Virginia and I found a few in Clifton Forge. However, most of the kit homes I found in Clifton Forge were Sears Homes.

Aladdin was another kit home company that, like Sears, sold kit homes through mail order. Aladdin Homes are fairly common in Virginia and I found a few in Clifton Forge. However, most of the kit homes I found in Clifton Forge were Sears Homes.

An Aladdin Sheffield in Clifton Forge

An Aladdin Sheffield in Clifton Forge

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Sears Homes in Atlanta, Georgia

September 12th, 2010 Sears Homes 14 comments

In 2010, I visited Atlanta, Georgia (and surrounding areas), where Nancy (an old house lover, kind soul and Acworth resident) drove me many miles seeking and finding kit homes. Below are a few of the houses we found in the area.

It’s likely that there are many more kit homes in Atlanta. Nancy and I devoted one day to photographing the Magnolia in Piedmont, Alabama (see photo below), and another day we went to small towns north of Atlanta. I’d love to return to Atlanta sometime soon and do a more thorough survey. If you know of a historical society and/or civic group that’d be interested in sponsoring my visit, please contact me by leaving a comment below.

Enjoy the photos!

And if you know of a Sears Home in the Atlanta area, let me know!

Do you live in a Sears Home? Click here to learn the Nine Easy Signs for identifying Sears Homes!

Read today’s blog by clicking here.

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The Magnolia was Sears biggest and best kit home. It was offered from 1918-1922. I literally traveled from my home in Norfolk to Atlanta, mainly to see this house up close and personal. See the actual house in the photo below.

The Magnolia was Sears biggest and best kit home. It was offered from 1918-1922. I literally traveled from my home in Norfolk to Atlanta, mainly to see this house "up close and personal." See the actual house in the photo below.

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One of my favorite photos is this Sears Magnolia in Alabama, just a few miles from the Georgia border!

One of my favorite photos is this Sears Magnolia in Alabama, just a few miles from the Georgia border. Apart from the slightly different dormer up top, this house is a good match to the catalog picture.

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Beautiful brick Alhambra in the heart of Atlanta!

Beautiful brick Alhambra in the heart of Atlanta!

This was Aladdins fanciest home: The Villa

This was Aladdin's fanciest home: The Villa. This is from the 1916 Aladdin catalog. Aladdin was a kit home company that (like Sears) also sold kit homes out of mail-order catalog. In Atlanta, I found more Aladdin kit homes than Sears kit homes. Not surprising, as Aladdin had a massive mill in Greensboro, NC.

The Aladdin Villa in Atlanta! This may be the prettiest Aladdin Villa that I have ever seen.

The Aladdin Villa in Atlanta! This may be the prettiest Aladdin Villa that I have ever seen. It is perfect in every way, and a spot-on match to the original catalog image.

The Aladdin Pasadena was a very popular house

The Aladdin Pasadena was a very popular house

And heres the Aladdin Pasadena we found in Atlanta!

And here's the Aladdin Pasadena we found in Atlanta!

Aladdin Pomona, from the 1919 Aladdin Homes catalog

Aladdin Pomona, from the 1919 Aladdin Homes catalog

Aladdin Pomona in Acworth, a suburb of Atlanta

Aladdin Pomona in Acworth, a suburb of Atlanta. This Pomona is in beautifully original condition! Note the details around the porch gable, and the flared columns and the original siding. It's a real beauty!

The Sears Osborn from the 1921 Sears catalog

The Sears Osborn from the 1921 Sears catalog

One of our most interesting finds was the modern Sears Osborn. It looks like an Osborn - kind of - but its too new and modern. And look at the cornice returns. Most likely, this Sears Osborn is a reproduction, designed by someone who loves Sears Homes!

One of our most interesting finds was the modern Sears Osborn. It looks like an Osborn - kind of - but it's too new and modern. And look at the cornice returns. Most likely, this Sears Osborn is a reproduction, designed by someone who loves Sears Homes!

If you know anything more about these houses, please leave a comment below.

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Click here to see more photos of Sears Homes!

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Sometimes, They’re Sitting in the Middle of Kansas Cornfields

August 5th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

In 2007, I traveled to Quinter, Kansas to visit Gale Ringer and learn more about his family’s “Ohio.” His grandfather, Mathias Ringer had purchased the Wardway kit home before World War I, and amazingly, this house had stayed in the family through the generations.

During my three-day stay with the Ringer family, we went driving around other parts of Kansas and that’s when we found the Aladdin Villa, sitting in the middle of a very large field.

As soon as possible, I sent a photo of the house to Dale Wolicki (who is THE expert on Aladdin Homes) and he could hardly believe that we’d stumbled upon one of Aladdin’s fanciest homes in such a quiet, rural area.

Aladdin was a kit home company that (like Sears), sold entire houses through their mail order catalog. Aladdin started selling kit homes in 1906 and outlasted all the competition, finally closing their doors in 1981.

Not surprisingly, North Carolina has many Aladdin Kit Homes. Aladdin had a massive mill in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Do you have a Villa in your city? If so, please leave a comment below!

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

Aladdin was a bigger company than Sears - in its day - but not as well known. They sold about 75,000 kit homes during their 75 years in business.

Aladdin was a bigger company than Sears - in its day - but not as well known. They sold about 75,000 kit homes during their 75 years in business. This page appeared in the 1914 catalog, before they opened their mill in Wilmington, NC.

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The Villa was their biggest fanciest house.

The Villa was their biggest fanciest house.

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Look at the size of these rooms!

Look at the size of these rooms!

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The 1919 catalog featured interior views of the Aladdin Living Room.

The 1919 catalog featured "interior" views of the Aladdin Living Room.

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And the dining room...

And the dining room...

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The Villa, as shown in the 1919 catalog.

The Villa, as shown in the 1919 catalog.

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This Villa is one of the prettiest Ive ever seen. Its in Atlanta.

This Villa is one of the prettiest I've ever seen. It's in Atlanta.

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This Villa is in Scotland Neck, NC.

This Villa is in Scotland Neck, NC.

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Driving around the Quinter area with the Ringer family in 2007, I discovered this perfect Aladdin Villa sitting in the middle of a massive Kansas cornfield. The Villa was probably Aladdins biggest and best house.

And this is the Villa in Kansas, sitting in the middle of a massive Kansas cornfield.

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Aladdin Villa from the catalog

Look at the price! That was an expensive house in the 1910s!

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To learn more about Aladdin Kit Homes, click here.