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Posts Tagged ‘alliance ohio’

The Sears Wabash: Economical and Popular!

August 7th, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

According to the promotional literature, the Sears Wabash was “a house planned and designed by U. S. Government architects.”

I’m not sure when The Wabash first appeared, but I found it in my 1916 catalog (and not the 1914 catalog).

In 1916, it was a mere $551, and in 1920, it had gone up to $966 . If this really was “Uncle  Sam’s Idea” (as the literature suggests), it may have been created as an answer to the problem of the building material shortage during The Great War (also known as “The European War”).

It’s an interesting house, and this is the second one that’s been found in Ohio. According to the testimonials, there were several of these sold throughout the Midwest.

Thanks so much to Robb Hyde for finding and photographing this kit home.

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1916

In 1916, the Wabash was offered for $551.

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1920

"Planned and designed by US government architects..." (1920)

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house 1920

It has two wee tiny bedrooms, and yet a massive living room (1920).

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Apparently it was really popular in Illinois

Apparently it was really popular in the Midwest.

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house house

That kitchen looks a lot bigger than 9x11 (1920).

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1920 house

"The Wabash," complete with screened porch (1920).

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Heres the Wabash Robb Hyde found in Somewhere.

Here's the Wabash that Robb Hyde found in Alliance, Ohio. At some point, the "sunporch" was converted into enclosed living space. With two bedrooms measuring 8x9, I'm sure the home's occupants were fairly desperate for every bit of living space they could get! Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Apparently, that porch got turned into living space.

Note the original columns, siding and verge board. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Veiw

Nice shot of the home's front, which highlights the unusual window arrangement. Porch deck is new, but everything else appears to be original. Given that this house is nearly 100 years old, that's darn impressive. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And Robb had the foresight to get some photos of the other side, too!

And Robb had the foresight to get some photos of the other side, too! Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Its a perfect match!

It's a perfect match!

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To read about the Sears Wabash that Donna Bakke found in Ohio, click here.

Thanks so much to Robb Hyde for finding and photographing this kit home.

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The Concord: A Modern Residence at a Low Cost

May 22nd, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

Sears offered two models called “The Concord.” The “old” Concord appeared in Sears first “Modern Homes Catalog” (in 1908), and remained in the catalog until at least 1918. In 1918, Sears Modern Homes were - for the first time - identified primarily by name, instead of number.

After all, would you rather have a Sears Modern Home #2049 or a Sears Magnolia? Same house, different words.  :)

The “new” Concord was a post 1930s house, and you can read about it here.

Judging from the testimonials, the (old) Concord was a fairly popular house, and yet in my travels, I’ve only seen one. There are a lot of “look-alikes” to the Sears Concord, but most of them have a side-gabled roof, whereas the Sears Concord has a hipped roof.

To see Rose’s latest book on Sears Homes, click here.

To read about a family that dearly loves (and appreciates) their Sears Concord, click here.

The Concord appeared in the very first Sears Modern Home catalog (1908).

The Concord appeared in the very first Sears Modern Home catalog (1908).

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By 1916, the house had become a real favorite, and of the 20 testimonials that appeared on the back page of the 1916 catalog, three of them were written by people whod purchased the Sears Concord.

By 1916, the house had become a real favorite, and of the 20 testimonials that appeared on the back page of the 1916 catalog, three of them were written by people who'd purchased the Sears Concord. This Concord was built by George E. Twiggar of Ossining, NY.

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Heres the text that accompanied the image (above).

Here's the text that accompanied the image (above). Note, there's also built at Havre de Grace, MD by Mr. J. H. Howlett.

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this is 19

This Concord (also known as C114) was built in Roselle Park, NJ.

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Number 19

It's a shame they didn't include a name here.

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Either these were very fast-growing trees, or he didnt send his snapshot to Sears until years after the house was finished.

Either these were very fast-growing trees, or he didn't send his snapshot to Sears until years after the house was finished. It's in Norwalk, Ohio.

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House

"The nicest house in town!"

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Carrollton

This Concord is looking a little rough. It's in Carrollton, IL.

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Dale in Monongahela, PA

Concord (sans porch) in Monongahela, PA. Photo is copyright 2010 Dale Patrick Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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But wait, theres more!

But wait, there's more! According to the 1916 Sears catalog, the Concord was also built in these cities. As mentioned above, this was apparently a popular house.

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Houses

And Mr. Morton built a Sears Concord in Bristol, Virginia, which is about seven hours from my home in Norfolk. Still, I'll have to go check it out some time.

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To read about the other Concord, click right here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To read the next blog, click here.

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