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Posts Tagged ‘alton’s historic homes’

Circled Head Dormer: The Happy Lorain

December 27th, 2014 Sears Homes 4 comments

If a mother could have favorites, the Sears Lorain would be on my Top Ten list. I’ve always had a soft spot in my house-shaped heart for Cape Cods, and the Lorain is a classic example of a 1930s Cape Cod.

In 1933, The Lorain was offered with the rounded dormer, but in later years, the design was changed into a gabled dormer. Personally, I prefer the round design (or “circled head” as Sears called it), but I suspect it was a problematic issue for the neophyte home builder, so it was changed.

In 2005, I visited New Jersey where an independent film maker did a one-hour documentary on the restoration of her Lorain (in NJ). It was well done, but I don’t know if she ever sold the film. It was titled, “Restoring Lorain.”

The filming of that one-hour documentary was a blast, and the woman film maker and her sister showed me great kindness and respect during my time with them. Maybe that’s why the Lorain is one of my favorites! :)

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Thanks so much to Rachel Shoemaker for sharing this image from her 1930 Sears General Merchandise catalog! What a wonderful ad, featuring the Lorain!

Thanks so much to Rachel Shoemaker for sharing this image from her 1930 Sears General Merchandise catalog! What a wonderful ad, featuring the Lorain!

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Now thats good writing!

Now that's good writing!

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1933 Lorain

In the 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog, the Lorain had a "Circled Head Dormer" (as shown above). Check out the arched porch roof with pediment. Down the side there's a bedroom window (full size) and two small windows (bath and kitchen). This is another distinctive feature to help identify the Lorain.

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Hey, whats Dad doing here? Mowing the neighbors yard?

Hey, what's Dad doing here? Mowing the neighbor's yard? Why, that's not even a Sears House in the background! The humanity!!

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1936

In 1936, the Lorain still had its "circled head dormer." And lots of flowers in the flowerboxes.

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By 1938

In 1938, the round dormer was replaced with a gabled dormer. The flowers remain.

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1936

I love reading this stuff (1936 catalog).

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1936

This is a darling little house, and check out the cut-out shutters (1936).

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One fave Petersburg

And it has a star. Hmmmm. How quaint. Nonetheless, this Lorain in Petersburg, WV is in darn good condition. If only I'd remembered to pack my battery-powered chain saw to deal with troublesome landscaping. That bush is right in the way of everything.

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PETERSBUR

Another angle of the Lorain in Petersburg, WV.

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Claremont NH

Not only does this Lorain in Claremont, NH retain its original windows (and storm windows), but it has its original cut-out shutters, too. How exciting is that?

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FP 1936

Nice sized rooms, but a tiny little bathroom.

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1936

No bathroom upstairs? Eek.

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1938

The 1938 Lorain.

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house alton

Here's an example in Alton, IL. That wooden deck railing is a special kind of ugly.

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Elgin

Yikes. This poor dear in Elgin, IL needs a emergency dormer-ectomy performed.

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A Magnolia in Alton, Illinois?! Sort Of!

September 24th, 2013 Sears Homes 6 comments

About 1999 or so, my [then] husband and I went to an open house in Alton, Illinois where we saw a darling house.

Last month, while I was looking through a 1952 Aladdin Homes catalog, I [re]discovered that darling house! The house my husband and I had toured in 1999 was actually an Aladdin kit house, “The Magnolia.”

In other words, this house - from Aladdin Homes in Bay City Michigan - came from a mail-order catalog and was shipped to the Alton train station in a box car. The house arrived in about 10,000 pieces and came with a detailed instruction book and a promise that an average fellow could have the house assembled in 90 days.

For the next few days, I really struggled to remember where I’d seen that house, and to the best of my recollection, it was not far from our home in Upper Alton (on Pine Street). Memory can be fickle, but I’d bet money that we saw the house on a little cross street not far from Edwards Street.

In 2006, I left Alton and moved to Norfolk, VA (which makes it harder to find kit homes in Southwestern Illinois).

Last week, I was in Alton visiting family and put more than 80 miles on my rental car, criss-crossing the short streets in Upper Alton. I had Garmin set on “slime trail” so that it left a light-blue line on every street that I traversed. (Have I mentioned how much I love my Garmin?)

Despite driving throughout this area many times over a course of several days, I never did find the Aladdin Magnolia. Now I’m starting to wonder if I saw this house in Godfrey (next door to Alton).

This Magnolia would have been built in the early 1950s, and when we saw it in 1999, it looked much like the house shown in this image. In other words, it had not been “remodeled,” so it should be easy to find. I distinctly remember the oversized living room window and the cantilevers under that second-floor balcony. I also remember the scalloped trim on that front gable.

But where is it?

Please leave a comment below if you know this home’s location. And please feel free to share this link with others who might know the answer to my mystery!

Thanks!!

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The cover of the 1952 catalog.

In 1952, sales of Aladdin kit homes were probably booming. Sears was out of the kit-house business and WW2 was over, and our nation came into a time of previously unknown prosperity and growth. (1952 catalog cover)

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Boxcar stacking

One of my favorite images from the 1952 catalog is this line-drawing showing a "phantom box car." The sides of the box car were invisible to showcase the intricate stacking of 10,000 pieces of kit house (1952 catalog).

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Alton has a Magnolia

Alton has a Magnolia, just like this, but where is it?

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Altons Magnolia

Detail of the first floor. It's a small house, but has a half-bath on the first floor.

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Alton FP

The second floor has three small bedrooms and an oddly-shaped bath tub.

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Maggy

Close-up of the Magnolia in Alton. Or is it Godfrey?

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Garmin

Whoever invented the "slime trail" feature of Garmin is my hero. Back in the day, I used maps and highlighters to figure out which streets I'd traversed. This shows the early hours of my search. By the time I left town Sunday night, almost every street in Upper Alton had the blue slime trail.

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Have you seen the Magnolia in Alton? If so, please leave a comment below.

To learn more about my other discoveries in River Bend, click here.

To see pictures of my favorite Alton kit house, click here.

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