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Posts Tagged ‘americus’

The Crescent: “For Folks Who Like a Touch of Individuality”

January 28th, 2013 Sears Homes 10 comments

The Crescent was a very popular kit house for Sears, and I’d venture to guess that it was one of their top ten most popular designs.

It was offered in two floorplans (Mama-sized and Papa-sized) and with an optional extra-high roof (Grandpapa sized).

Because of this, Crescents can be found in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes, the pitch of the porch roof was changed to be more proportionate to the primary roof. Today, this results in all manner of confusion about whether or not a Crescent is the real deal.

Below are several examples of Sears Crescents from all over the country.

House 1

Sears Crescent, as seen in the 1929 Modern Homes catalog.

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House 2

"Interior Views" of the Crescent (1929).

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kitchen 1929

Close-up of the Crescent's kitchen (1929).

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LR 1929

Nice looking living room, too!

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Bed

The bedrooms weren't' this big but why let details get in the way of a nice story?

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The Crescent was offered with two floorplans.

The Crescent was offered with two floorplans, C33258A (shown here).

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And this

And this C3259A (the larger floorplan). Note it has THREE columns on the front porch.

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Adding a dormer to the optional finished second floor would have created a lot more space.

Adding a couple dormers (on the front) to the optional "finished" second floor would have created a lot more space. The finished second floor was only offered with the smaller Crescent. But that does not mean that someone couldn't finish off the 2nd floor on their own!

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Glen Ellyn

Glen Ellyn (Illinois) has a Crescent with three dormer windows.

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Ypsilanti Andrew Mutch

This dormered Crescent is in Ypsilanti. Photo is copyright 2013 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Ypsilanti Andrew Mutch

In Ypsilanti, they like their Crescents with dormers! Photo is copyright 2013 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Godfrey

A sad little Crescent waits for death in Godfrey, IL. Again, note the unique angle of the porch roof. This has also been authenticated as a Sears Home.

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Raleigh

A picture-perfect Crescent in Raleigh. The dormers were original to the house.

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West Point

Some Crescents have very steep porch roofs and some have very shallow. This Crescent in West Point has been authenticated by Rose as the real deal.

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Atlanta Crescent

This Crescent look-a-like is in Atlanta. I suspect it is NOT a Crescent.

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Crescent Wheaton

A Sears Crescent in Wheaton, IL.

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Eastern Shore MD

Hubby and I found this Crescent on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

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Elmhurst IL

Is this a Sears Crescent? It's in Elmhurst IL.

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Crescent Elgin

This poor Crescent in Elgin, IL has had a hurting put on it. Rebecca Hunter has authenticated this house as a Sears Crescent.

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Elgin

It's been remodeled, but you can still see it's a Crescent. (Elgin, Illinois)

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Elgins also

This Crescent is also in Elgin, IL.

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Elgins also

Elgin Illinois has the largest known collection of Sears Homes in the country. They have a lot of Sears Crescents, too!

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Crystal Lake

Not surprisingly, the Chicago suburbs are full of Sears Homes. This one is in Crystal Lake.

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Champaign

Another beautiful Crescent. This one is in Champaign, IL.

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house Charlotte

I stalked this house for 30 solid minutes, but the young woman on the porch never did hang up the phone, so in desperation, I snapped a photo of the house, phone caller and all. This beauty is in Charlotte, NC.

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Chharlotte

A perfect Crescent in Charlotte, NC.

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Bloomginton

This Crescent also has the less-steep pitch on the porch roof, but it's most likely a Sears Crescent. Notice the medallion inside the front porch (on the wall).

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Bloomington

This photo was taken in 2003 (and it was scanned from an old slide) and it's in Bloomington, IL.

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Wood Riiver

Is this a Crescent? The pitch of the porch roof is much less than that of the traditional porch roof in other Crescents, but I'd be inclined to say it probably is a Crescent. This house is in Wood River, Illinois.

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Alton

This Crescent has a dramatically raised second floor. To compensate for the extra steep pitch of the roof, the porch roof was also raised a bit. This beauty is in Alton, Illinois.

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Ypsilanti

Yet another dormered Crescent is in Ypsilanti. Photo is copyright 2013 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And one of my favorites: A beautiul and well-loved Crescent in Webster Groves, MO (near St. Louis).

A beautiful and well-loved Crescent in Webster Groves, MO (near St. Louis). Again, look at the variation on the pitch of that porch roof, and yet this is an authenticated Sears Home.

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house Wilmette, IL Rebecca

Now this house has some dormers! It's in Illinois, and was discovered by Rebecca Hunter. Photo is copyright 2013 Rebecca Hunter and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Crescent was a perennial favorite aand was offered from 1919 to 1933.

The Crescent was a perennial favorite and was offered from 1919 to 1933. It's shown here in the 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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To learn more about how to identify kit homes, click here.

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The Sears Houses That Pat Found (in Ohio)!

February 27th, 2012 Sears Homes 6 comments

Two years ago, when my last computer burped twice and fell over dead, I recovered 35,000 photos from the hard drive. That was two years ago. Since then, I’ve added many more photos, and I’ve received (via email) several hundred photos. Sometimes, it takes me a while to get those photos organized and posted here at the website.

Pat of Ohio sent me these wonderful photos of kit homes in Ohio almost a year ago. They’re wonderful pictures, but even better than the pictures is the note she sent along.

Without your books, we would never have found such excitement and joy! Every time we spot another kit house, whether it be a Sears or an Aladdin, we get so excited! Of course, if my son is with us he just cringes when he sees the camera come out, because he knows many photos will be taken and his trip home will be delayed!

He now has a standard question before we leave the house: “Are you guys going to be looking at more houses? Because if you are, I’m staying here. You guys are obsessed!”

Below are a few of the kit homes that Pat found in Ohio.

First, the catalog page. Heres the Sears Windsor, also known as the Sears Carlin, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

Here's the Sears Windsor, also known as the Sears Carlin (1919 catalog).

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Sears Windsor in Willoughby, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

Sears Windsor in Willoughby, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Sears Kilborn, from the 1928 catalog.

Sears Kilbourne, from the 1928 catalog.

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Sears Kilborn, also in Willoughby Hills, Ohio.

Sears Kilborn, also in Willoughby Hills, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Sears Americus, from the 1928 catalog.

Sears Americus, from the 1928 catalog.

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Sears Americus in Willoughby, Ohio.

Sears Americus in Willoughby, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Sears Conway, from 1921.

Sears Conway, from 1921.

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Heres a darling Conway tucked behind the trees in Mayfield Heights, Ohio.

Here's a darling Conway tucked behind the trees in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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One of my favorites, the Dover, from 1928.

One of my favorites, the Dover, from 1928.

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And here it is in Mentor, Ohio.

And here it is in Mentor, Ohio. Still has its original batten shutters! Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Sears Rodessa, from the 1928 catalog.

The Sears Rodessa, from the 1928 catalog.

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The Sears Rodessa in Mayfield Heights, Ohios.

The Sears Rodessa in Mayfield Heights, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Sears Westly, as seen in the 1916 catalog.

Sears Westly, as seen in the 1916 catalog.

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Apparently, Mentor Ohio has many Sears Homes, such as this Westly. And so many of these homes have their original siding! entor Ohio.

Apparently, Mentor Ohio has many Sears Homes, such as this Westly. And so many of these homes have their original siding and railings. This is a real beauty. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another favorite of mine, The Willard, a classic neo-tudor (1928 catalog).

Another favorite of mine, The Willard, a classic neo-tudor (1928 catalog).

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Altered, but still identifiable.

Altered, but still identifiable. One of the classic features of the Willard are those three windows on the left (in this photo). This house is in Lyndhurst, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Sears Barrington was also a popular house (1928 catalog).

The Sears Barrington was also a popular house (1928 catalog).

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And this sweet thing is in Willoughby.

And this sweet thing is in Willoughby. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Pat also found a house by Harris Brothers (a competitor of Sears). The J-181 was a very popular house for Harris Brothers.

Pat also found a house by Harris Brothers (a competitor of Sears). The J-181 was a very popular house for Harris Brothers.

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And heres the J-181 in Hudson, Ohio.

And here's the J-181 in Hudson, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2011 Pat Burton and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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To keep reading about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn how to identify kit homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s books, click here.

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Four Sweet Things in a Row in Chambersburg

November 26th, 2011 Sears Homes 1 comment

In late 2005, a friend and I followed the Lincoln Highway from New Jersey (near Fort Lee) to central Illinois. Along the way, I found these four beauties in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.

The first house (far left) is a Sears Osborn, followed by a Sears Fullerton, and then a Sears Americus and finally a Sears Winona (far right).

I’d love to know how these four popular models of Sears Homes came to be built alongside the Lincoln Highway!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

Three

Four Sears Homes in a row!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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Perhaps the Most Remuddled Americus in America

July 21st, 2011 Sears Homes 3 comments

Did they *know* this was a Sears House when they killed it?

Before I get myself into trouble with too many words, I’ll let the pictures tell the sad story. It’s in Pennsylvania, not far from that beautiful brick Magnolia in Irwin!

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The Americus, as seen in the 1921 catalog.

The Americus, as seen in the 1921 catalog.

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I think the bush is trying to protect it from street view. Grow Mr. Bush, grow fast! One of the defining features of the Americus is all those fine windows, most of which have been stripped by this "siding job."

The other side isnt much better, but at least there are a few windows.

The other side isn't much better, but at least there are a few windows.

Palate cleanse, courtesy Beckley, WV.

Palate cleanse, courtesy Beckley, WV.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s most-excellent book, click here.

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Is The Plural of Americus, “Americci”?

July 11th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Indefatigable researcher and old house lover Rachel Shoemaker found another Sears House in Tulsa. This is the Sears Americus, and it’s one of my favorite Sears Homes.

For the unenlightened, these houses started life as 12,000-piece kits and were shipped by rail to wanna-be homeowners in all 48 states. Each “kit” came with a 75-page instruction book and a promise that a “man of average abilities” could have one of these homes built in90 days.

More than 70,000 people gave it a try and purchased one of these kit homes. The Americus (one of 370 designs offered in the Sears Roebuck catalog) was one of their most popular designs.

The Americus was a very popular house for Sears.

The Americus was a very popular house for Sears.

The Americus in Tulsa is missing its eave brackets, but its still clearly an Americus. Photo is courtesy of Rachel Shoemaker.

The Americus in Tulsa is missing its eave brackets, but it's still clearly an Americus. Photo is courtesy of Rachel Shoemaker.

house

Beautiful house, and it's such a happy house too!

The Americus in Tulsa.

The Americus in Tulsa is a nice match to the catalog image. One of its distinguishing features is that the first floor front wall is flat, and the second floor front wall has that bump out on the right side.

Another distinquishing feature is

Another distinquishing feature is the edge of the porch roof. It looks like a large, sideways "V" and it extends well beyond the home's primary wall.

Just like this.

Just like this.

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And in the mid-1920s, it was priced at $2,146.

Perhaps my favorite Americus of all time is this house in Ohio. Its a perfect match to the catalog page.

Perhaps my favorite Americus of all time is this house in Ohio. It's a perfect match to the catalog page.

Another distinquishing feature is

It's a beauty!

To learn more about the Sears Homes in Tulsa, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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