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Posts Tagged ‘bay city MI’

The Sherman Triplets

September 24th, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

Several years ago, dear friend and co-author Dale Wolicki gave me and Rebecca Hunter a first-class tour of Bay City, Michigan. One of the homes he pointed out to us was “The Sherman,” a kit home built on one of the many tree-lined streets of this historic city in Northern Michigan.

The Sherman was a kit house offered by Lewis Manufacturing, a kit-home company that was based in Bay City. Like Sears, Lewis Manufacturing also sold kit homes through their mail-order catalog in the early 1900s. These houses were shipped in 12,000-piece kits and arrived by box car. Each kit included detailed blueprints and a lengthy instruction manual that told you how all those pieces and parts went together.

It was estimated that “a man of average abilities” could have a house assembled in 3-4 months.

Not surprisingly, Bay City is home to a surfeit of kit homes from both Lewis Manufacturing and Aladdin Kit Homes (which was also based in Bay City).

Thanks to Dale Wolicki for being such a good friend and tour guide and also for sharing so many vintage catalogs with me, including a 1927 Homebuilder’s Catalog!

Lewis sold some big fancy homes, as well as the more modest Sherman. To read more about that, click here.

To visit Dale’s website, click here.

Rebecca’s website is here.

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Heres the Lewis Sherman that Dale pointed out to us in Bay City, Michigan.

Here's the Lewis "Sherman" that Dale pointed out to us in Bay City, Michigan. I do wish I'd made a note of the street, but I remember that I was located in Bay City!

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The Sherman in Bay City is a nice match to this 1920 catalog image.

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Floorplan

It's a simple but practical floorplan. The living room is quite spacious given the size of the house.

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The Sherman has a twin in the 1927 Homebuilders Catalog (a plan book catalog).

The Sherman has a "twin" in the 1927 Homebuilder's Catalog (a plan book catalog). Plan book houses were a little different from kit homes. Kit homes were complete kits (blueprints and building materials) whereas plan book houses were just blueprints and a LIST of the building materials you'd need to buy.

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House

In fact, there are two houses in the 1927 Homebuilder's 's catalog that bear a stunning resemblance to the Lewis "Sherman." The Cadott is mighty close, with a few minor differences (1927 catalog).

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Whats really fun is to compare these three floorplans side-by-side.

What's really fun is to compare these three floorplans side-by-side. Far left is the Cadott (Homebuilder's) and the Lewis Sherman (center image) and the Catalpa (Homebuilder's). The Cadott is 28' deep, the Sherman is 30' deep and the Catalpa is 29 feet deep. Through these very minor changes, the companies hoped to avoid the appearance of "stealing" one another's designs. Interestingly, the Sherman is the only one without a fireplace.

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Side-by-side comparison of the houses themselves is also interesting.

A side-by-side comparison of the houses themselves is also entertaining. The Cadott is on the far left, Lewis Sherman in the center and the Catalpa is on the far right. There are some minor differences on the exterior, such as window arrangement. Plus, the corbels on the front porch are different. And they all need landscaping!

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The corbels on the Lewis Sherman are unique (thank goodness).

The corbels on the Lewis Sherman are unique (thank goodness).

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All of which leads me back to this simple truth: Dale is right! This is a Lewis Sherman in Bay City!  :D

All of which leads me back to this simple truth: Dale is right! This is a Lewis "Sherman" in Bay City! :D

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To visit Dale’s website, click here.

Rebecca’s website is here.

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The Navarre: Remarkably Well Designed

February 18th, 2014 Sears Homes 3 comments

In “Driving Miss Daisy,” there’s a scene where Hoke is studying a wall filled with family pictures, and he comments “I just love a house with pictures, Miss Daisy. It do make a house a home.”

Hardly a day goes by that someone doesn’t send me a picture of a house, but my favorites are the old family photos that capture a moment in time when a family was enjoying their newly built “home.”

Last week, Donita Roben joined our group on Facebook (”Sears Homes”) and posted a picture of her home, asking if someone could identify a family home that had come from Sears Roebuck.

In no time at all, Rachel Shoemaker identified the house as a Lewis Navarre, and posted original catalog images from the 1920 catalog. (BTW, to read more about why 80% of people who think they have a Sears House are wrong, click here.)

Thanks so much to Donita for sharing these photos! And thanks to Rachel for identifying this wonderful old house!

To hear Rose’s recent interview on NPR, click here!

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Donita said that her father-in-law remembered the house being delivered by train. She wrote, "My father-in-law remembers that everyone in town was so excited about its arrival. He talked about unloading the train and hauling things by wagon. Even the kids got in on helping by pulling their little wagons loaded with kegs of nails, etc. He did not live in the house until later. It was actually built by the town doctor (Dr. Cross)." Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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One of the things I love about the vintage image (shown above) is that it shows the Lewis Navarre from the same angle as the 1924 catalog picture!

One of the things I love about the vintage image (shown above) is that it shows the Lewis Navarre from the same angle as the 1924 catalog picture!

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A close-up of the fam also provides some detail on the front porch.

A close-up of the boys also provides some detail on the front porch. Check out those paneled columns. Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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columns

Knowing what those columns look like, the readers of this blog should be able to spot a Lewis Navarre at 100 paces! Quite unique! (Image is from 1924 Lewis Homes Catalog.)

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The Navarre was a surprisingly spacious house with a full second floor.

The Navarre was a surprisingly spacious house with a full second floor. The house has four bedrooms and a bath on the second floor. Downstairs, it had a nice-size kitchen with a walk-in pantry and a mudroom.

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Donita also shared some pictures of the homes interior.

Donita also shared some pictures of the home's interior. The photo was taken in the dining room, facing into the living room. Note the fireplace on the left. Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And it still has its original windows!

And it still has its original windows! Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And she found some markings under the staircase.

And she found some markings on the lumber Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Heres the original catalog page from 1924 Lewis Homes.

"You can see that the Navarre is remarkably well designed..." (1924).

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And theres the house as it appears today!

In her email to me, Donita wrote, "One of my best friends lived in this house and I used to walk home from school with her when we were in high school. I spent quite a bit of time at the house, and loved it even then." Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Thanks so much to Donita for sharing these photos! And thanks to Rachel for identifying this wonderful old house!

To hear Rose’s recent interview on NPR, click here!

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