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Posts Tagged ‘bay city’

Aladdin Kit Homes - Build Your Own

May 5th, 2015 Sears Homes 6 comments

No

No profound and loquacious blogs today: Just a very cool advertisement from 1915.

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But whats really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

But what's really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

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And zoom in just a bit more...

And zoom in just a bit more...

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To read about the Aladdin Carnation (shown above on the left), click here.

To learn more about the Aladdins in Roanoke Rapids, click here.

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The Brentwood: A Home of Impressive Beauty (1952)

April 29th, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Many times, I’ve written a note to someone to tell them that they’re living in an Aladdin Kit Home, and invariably, when they right back they’ll say, “I’m so excited to find out that I have a Sears House!”

In fact, I’d say that this happens 80% of the time.

Aladdin kit homes are not Sears kit homes. These are two different companies.

Sears gets all the press, but there were six other companies selling kit homes on a national level and Sears was neither the biggest, nor the longest lived. Sears started selling homes in 1908 and was gone by 1940. Conversely, Aladdin issued their first catalog in 1906 and closed their doors in 1981. During their 32 years in the business, Sears sold about 70,000 homes. Aladdin sold more than 75,000 homes.

When I wrote my first article about kit homes in early 2000, many folks had never even heard of Sears Homes, so perhaps in time, people will come to appreciate (and know about) Aladdin. From an architectural standpoint, it’s a more interesting company, just because of the variety of housing styles offered through the decades.

And many thanks to Dale Wolicki and Rebecca Hunter for finding the beauty featured below! You can visit Dale’s website here, and you can learn more about Rebecca here.

To learn more about identify kit homes, click here.

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The Brentwood was featured on the cover of the 1952 catalog.

The Brentwood was featured on the cover of the 1951 catalog.

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Aladdin was actually a bigger company than Sears, and longer-lived, but today, it seems that fewer people are aware of this company.

Aladdin was actually a bigger company than Sears, and longer-lived, but today, it seems that fewer people are aware of this company (1951 catalog).

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Picture

Close-up of the picture from the page above. The text explains why it's simple to build with the Readi-cut system. I was hoping that those are Aladdin houses in the background, but I don't think they are.

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Thanks to the modern marvel of machinery (and electricity), one man can now do the work of six!

Thanks to the modern marvel of machinery (and electricity), and a central site for pre-cutting all the framing lumber, one man can now do the work of six!

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The Brentwood was a dandy house.

The Brentwood was a dandy house with four floor plans with some variation.

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FP1

Floorplan one is the only house with a fireplace.

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FP21

Floorplan two is down to two bedrooms, but has a bigger kitchen/DR.

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FP3

Floorplan 2 and 3 have the same layout, but 3 is a smaller footrpint.

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FP4

Floorplan 3 and 4 are the same footprint, but with three bedrooms carved into the small space.

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FP4

This appears to be Floorplan #1, as it has a fireplace and a planter under that bedroom window. Apparently, the houses in this subdivision have tremendous water pressure. The guy with the house is being pushed backwards.

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Then again, he also looks like Americas first metrosexual.

Then again, he also looks like America's first metrosexual.

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Thie

Located in Elm Grove, Wisconsin, this gorgeous Mid-Century Modern Ranch is a perfect match to the catalog image. My favorite feature is that over sized, dramatic fireplace (which appears to have several flues). Photo is copyright 2015 Dale Wolicki and Rebecca Hunter and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

What a house!

What a house!

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You can visit Dale’s website here, and you can learn more about Rebecca here.

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A Kit House in Lebanon! (New Hampshire)

September 12th, 2014 Sears Homes 3 comments

Last week, Hubby and I traveled to Vermont to see all the pretty things up there (including the Ben and Jerry’s Factory).

Sadly, I didn’t see much in the way of kit homes, but I did discover this gorgeous “San Fernando” offered by Lewis Homes (early 1920s).

The house is just across the Connecticut River in New Hampshire in a small town known as Lebanon. (We ended up staying at the Fireside Inn and Suites in West Lebanon.)

Lewis Homes was a kit home company (like Sears and Aladdin), and it was based in Bay City, Michigan. While Sears and Aladdin tend to get all the ink, the fact is that there were six companies selling kit homes on a nation-wide basis.

As you can see from the pictures below, it is a gorgeous house and has its original windows and siding. Might even be the original storm windows!

To read about the other pretty houses I found in this area, click here.

Read about my train adventure by clicking here!

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The Lewis San Fernando is a beautiful bungalow.

The Lewis San Fernando is a beautiful bungalow (1924 catalog).

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It merited a two-page spread in the 1924 catalog!

It merited a two-page spread in the 1924 catalog!

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And with two floorplans!

And with two floorplans!

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2

These floorplans appear to be the same (mostly), but this one is two feet longer (1924).

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It really is a beautiful bungalow!

It really is a beautiful bungalow!

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House

Located on Main Street in Lebanon, NH, this is a beautiful San Fernando!

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Perfect - DOWN to the details!

Perfect - DOWN to the details!

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windows

Hard to say for sure, but these are either original storms or fine-looking replacements.

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Heres a San Fernando that Dale and I found in Ohio.

Here's a San Fernando that Dale and I found in Ohio. That's Dale looking at the house.

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While in Vermont, we drove up to Graniteville to visit the Rock of Ages Quarry. That was great fun!

While in Vermont, we drove up to Graniteville to visit the Rock of Ages Quarry. The water is turqouise color due to some of the minerals leeching out from the rock.

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The Navarre: Remarkably Well Designed

February 18th, 2014 Sears Homes 3 comments

In “Driving Miss Daisy,” there’s a scene where Hoke is studying a wall filled with family pictures, and he comments “I just love a house with pictures, Miss Daisy. It do make a house a home.”

Hardly a day goes by that someone doesn’t send me a picture of a house, but my favorites are the old family photos that capture a moment in time when a family was enjoying their newly built “home.”

Last week, Donita Roben joined our group on Facebook (”Sears Homes”) and posted a picture of her home, asking if someone could identify a family home that had come from Sears Roebuck.

In no time at all, Rachel Shoemaker identified the house as a Lewis Navarre, and posted original catalog images from the 1920 catalog. (BTW, to read more about why 80% of people who think they have a Sears House are wrong, click here.)

Thanks so much to Donita for sharing these photos! And thanks to Rachel for identifying this wonderful old house!

To hear Rose’s recent interview on NPR, click here!

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Heres

Donita said that her father-in-law remembered the house being delivered by train. She wrote, "My father-in-law remembers that everyone in town was so excited about its arrival. He talked about unloading the train and hauling things by wagon. Even the kids got in on helping by pulling their little wagons loaded with kegs of nails, etc. He did not live in the house until later. It was actually built by the town doctor (Dr. Cross)." Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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One of the things I love about the vintage image (shown above) is that it shows the Lewis Navarre from the same angle as the 1924 catalog picture!

One of the things I love about the vintage image (shown above) is that it shows the Lewis Navarre from the same angle as the 1924 catalog picture!

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A close-up of the fam also provides some detail on the front porch.

A close-up of the boys also provides some detail on the front porch. Check out those paneled columns. Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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columns

Knowing what those columns look like, the readers of this blog should be able to spot a Lewis Navarre at 100 paces! Quite unique! (Image is from 1924 Lewis Homes Catalog.)

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The Navarre was a surprisingly spacious house with a full second floor.

The Navarre was a surprisingly spacious house with a full second floor. The house has four bedrooms and a bath on the second floor. Downstairs, it had a nice-size kitchen with a walk-in pantry and a mudroom.

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Donita also shared some pictures of the homes interior.

Donita also shared some pictures of the home's interior. The photo was taken in the dining room, facing into the living room. Note the fireplace on the left. Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And it still has its original windows!

And it still has its original windows! Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And she found some markings under the staircase.

And she found some markings on the lumber Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Heres the original catalog page from 1924 Lewis Homes.

"You can see that the Navarre is remarkably well designed..." (1924).

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And theres the house as it appears today!

In her email to me, Donita wrote, "One of my best friends lived in this house and I used to walk home from school with her when we were in high school. I spent quite a bit of time at the house, and loved it even then." Photo is copyright 2014 Donita Roben and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Thanks so much to Donita for sharing these photos! And thanks to Rachel for identifying this wonderful old house!

To hear Rose’s recent interview on NPR, click here!

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A Supersized Aladdin Villa in Bartlesville, Oklahoma!

April 10th, 2013 Sears Homes 11 comments

The Sears House Lady of Tulsa, also known as indefatigable kit house researcher Rachel Shoemaker, made a little detour the other day on her way home (as we kit house lovers are wont to do), and made a wonderful discovery: A supersized Aladdin Villa in Bartlesville, Oklahoma!

The Aladdin Villa, as offered in the 1919 catalog, was 62 feet across the front (including the sunporch). That’s a big house, but the Villa that Rachel discovered is even wider.

Best of all, the Villa  in Bartlesville is well-loved, and has been painstakingly maintained.

To visit Rachel’s website, click here.

Interested in learning how to identify kit homes?  Click here.

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The Aladdin Villa was the crme de le creme

The Villa was the crème de la crème of Aladdin's kit homes. It was spacious, beautiful, and elegant. This drawing was based on the Villa built in Bay City, Michigan (the corporate headquarters for Aladdin). Maybe that's Otto and William on the front porch?

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Unlike most kit homes, the Villa had plenty of room, and one of the more interesting options available was third floor maids rooms.

One of the more interesting options available was the "third floor maids' quarters."

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The living room was luxuriously

The Villa's living room was prominently featured in the 1919 Aladdin catalog.

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sunporch had a fireplace

And the Villa's sunporch had its own fireplace!

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floorplan

If I'm doing my math right, this house was 62 feet across the front and 26 feet deep. That's a very spacious house. On many Villas, I've seen the optional second-floor sun room.

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Heres Rachels bartlesville

Rachel's found this "supersized Villa" in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

From the front, you can see just how massive this Villa really is. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house house hosue

Close-up of the details around the front door. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house house

The owners have done some remodeling to the house, but have done a first-class job. It's one of the most historically sensitive and thoughtful remodelings that I've ever come across. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house house

Rachel even managed to get a picture of this grand old house from the REAR, showing off the massive sunporch. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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But wait, there’s more!

In addition to the Villa, Rachel also found a Sears 264P233 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma!

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house

From the 1914 Sears Modern Homes catalog, here's a picture of the Sears Model 264P233.

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As seen

Oh my, what a perfect match!! And it's in Bartlesville! Wow!

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To visit Rachel’s website (focusing on the kit homes of Oklahoma) click here.

To learn more about Roanoke Rapids, click here.

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The Stanhope, not in Iowa or New Jersey, but Norfolk!

January 19th, 2013 Sears Homes 2 comments

Stanhope is the name of a city in Iowa and New Jersey. And it’s also the name of a car that was sold from 1904-1906, by the Twyford Motor Car Company of Brookville, Pennsylvania.

But for this blog, we’re going to talk about the Stanhope that was sold by Aladdin of Bay City, Michigan.

The Stanhope was a fairly popular house. In 1920s America, it was an ideal home in both size and price.  And unlike so many of these diminutive bungalows, it had three bedrooms (most had two).

Yes, they were only 10 x 10, but for the family with four girls and three boys, it was probably a whole lot better than fold-out cots in the living and dining rooms (another popular option at the time).

Aladdin, like Sears, offered kit homes through their mail-order catalog. Sears sold about 70,000 kit homes during their 32 years in the building business. Aladdin sold more than 75,000 homes. The Sears Modern Homes department was in business from 1908-1940. Aladdin started selling houses in 1906, and didn’t close until 1981, a full 75 years!

Here in Norfolk, Virginia (where I live), we have many more Aladdins than Sears. Aladdin had a large mill in Wilmington, NC which explains why there are so many Aladdin kit homes in the Southeast.

Thanks to Dale Wolicki for providing info on Aladdin!

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

To read more about Roanoake Rapids (which has a massive collection of Aladdin kit homes), click here.

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Aladdin (based in Bay City) sold kit homes through mail order.

Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan) sold kit homes through mail order. This is my favorite graphic from their catalog (1919).

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The Stanhope was one of Aladdins most popular little houses.

The Stanhope was one of Aladdin's most popular little houses.

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But it was a very small house.

It had three bedrooms, but it was a very small house.

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The full

The catalog page featuring the Stanhope, as it appeared in 1919.

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After reading this delicious description, kinda makes ME want to run out and buy a Stanhope of my own!

"Are you not pleased with the Stanhope?"

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One of the

Aladdin was famous for their "Dollar a Knot" guarantee.

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The Stanhope

The Stanhope can be tough to identify because it looks like every little early 20th Century bungalow and is rather nondescript.

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And yet, you can find them if theyre in original condition. Heres a perfect Stanhope in Scotland Neck, NC (near Roanoke Rapids).

And yet, they can be identified if they're in original condition. Here's a perfect Stanhope in Scotland Neck, NC (near Roanoke Rapids).

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Nice match, isnt it?

Nice match, isn't it?

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And heres one in Norfolk, Virginia. This house is very close to ODU, and is on 51st Street.

And here's one in Norfolk, Virginia. This house is very close to ODU, and is on 51st Street. It's a perfect example of the Aladdin Stanhope and one of my favorite finds!

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To learn more about how to identify kit homes, click here.

Have you visited Roanoke Rapids? It’s a town FULL of Aladdin kit homes. Click here to learn more.

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Coming Out Of The Closet: Murphy Beds

November 12th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

In the early years of the 20th Century, living a simple, modest, clutter-free life was an integral part of The Bungalow Craze.

Murphy Beds were an integral part of that “space-saving” mind-set. And they were very practical, too. After one’s morning prayers and ablutions, how often did one return to their sleeping quarters?

When the sun popped up in the morning, it was time to make the bed, fluff the pillows and tuck your bed back into the wall.

During tough economic times, there was an expectation that homeowners would take in needy family members. When times got really tough, homeowners took on borders, too.  (Bear in mind, this was before government became our All-in-all.)

The Murphy Bed made our little bungalows a little bit bigger, and a little more accommodating.

In the 1920s and 30s, the sale of Murphy Beds skyrocketed. In the 1950s and 60s, sales dropped, as Americans moved into bigger and bigger houses. In the 1990s and beyond, sales again are way up, due to a poor economy, high unemployment and rising housing costs.

Some of the early 20th Century kit homes offered by Sears and Aladdin featured Murphy Beds.

“The Cinderella” (so named because the house was so small it required less work), was a cute and cozy kit home offered by Sears in the early 1920s. This little bungalow made good use of its small spaces by incorporating a Murphy Bed. Take a look at the pictures below to see how they did things 100 years ago.

To learn more about built-ins in the 1920s kit home, click here.

To learn about breakfast nooks, click here.

Read about The Sorlien Ceiling Bed here!

If you enjoy the blog, please oh please, share the link on Facebook!  :)

The Cinderella (1921 Sears catalog) was so named because it was an efficient bungalow that saved the housewife

The Cinderella (1921 Sears catalog) was so named because it was an efficiently designed bungalow that saved the housewife much time and effort.

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Interior views of The Cinderella (1921).

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Houses

Less furniture to buy - less trouble and work. Good points, actually.

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houses

In the Cinderella, the beds were tucked into a closet during the day.

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housese

This is my favorite shot. This room was about five feet wide and ten feet deep, but it looks pretty darn spacious. And look at that sink at the end of the wall. Just a lone sink.

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house

The Cinderella assumed that both Living and Dining Rooms would be used as sleeping spaces.

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right order here

It's so easy, even a child can do it! Sort of.

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house

Floorplan shows how tiny that "bed space" really is. It was 10'11" long and - if the drawing is anything near scale, it appears about five feet wide. In modern times, the folks looking at this house probably thought, "How odd! A big walk-in closet next to the living room, and it even has a sink in the corner!"

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"Dressing room and bed space." Pretty tiny space!!!

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Calumet also

"Twenty rooms in 12." Eight of those 20 rooms were closets with a bed.

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four rooms

Here are two of those eight "bedrooms." At least they have a window.

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wall

Close-up on the Murphy Bed in the Calumet.

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Bloom

And here's a real, live Calumet in Bloomington, IL.

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Aladdin Sonoma (1919)

Like Sears, Aladdin (Bay City, MI) also sold kit homes through mail order. They had a line of wee tiny Aladdin homes known as "Aladdinettes." Here's a picture of the Sonoma (1919), one of their Aladdinnette houses.

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And

The Aladdinnette's "bed space" was really tiny. Only 6'9" by 5'. You have to step out of the room to change your mind!!

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best

Close-up of the Aladdinnette's "closet bed."

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And despite those Laurel and Hardy episodes...

Despite what you've seen on those Laurel and Hardy episodes...

To read the next awesome blog, click here.

Interested in other early 20th Century space savers? Click here.

Youtube demonstration of a real Murphy Bed (1916).

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Make That FIVE Sterling Kit Homes in Anderson, South Carolina.

June 19th, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

In yesterday’s blog, I talked about the four Sterling kit homes that I found in Anderson, South Carolina.

Click here to read more about that.

Well, when I was in Anderson, I took a photo of another house that I couldn’t readily identify, but it triggered a memory. This morning, I sat down and went through the 1928 Sterling Homes catalog and realized that my “triggered memory” was The Sterling Classic. This now represents the FIFTH house from Sterling Homes that I found in Anderson.

It’s a pretty distinctive house and there’s little doubt (especially with the other four houses) that this could be anything but another Sterling Home.

Again I wonder - how in the world did Anderson - 800 miles due south from Bay City, Michigan, end up with so many Sterling Homes? And are there MORE than five? I’m sure there are. My knowledge of Sterling Homes is truly pitiable. My buddy Dale Wolicki is the expert on Sterling.

But even a blind squirrel finds an acorn from time to time, and I happened to find five Sterlings in Anderson. I’m confident there are many more.

And if anyone can get me a better photo of this little house, I’d be profoundly grateful.  :)

The FIFTH Sterling kit house in Anderson is the Classic (1928 catalog).

The FIFTH Sterling kit house in Anderson is the "Classic" (1928 catalog).

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Nice floorplan, too.

Nice floorplan, too.

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The Classic

The Classic had several distinctive features, such as the two matching "picture" windows on the home's front and that small, low dormer. But most distinctive is that front porch. The four piers extend beyond the home's walls and the porch column sits within those four piers. Now that's very unusual.

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The close

Close-up on that unusual feature.

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And heres the Classic in Anderson.

And here's the "Classic" in Anderson.

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Take a look at the front porch detail.

Take a look at the front porch detail. It shows that column sitting within the space created by the four piers. This is a good match!!

Again - how did Anderson end up with so many Sterling Homes? I’d love to know.

To learn more about Sterling Homes, click here.

To read more about the Sterling Homes in Anderson, click here.

If you’re able to get me a better photo of this house, please leave a comment below!

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Wow! THREE Sterling Homes in Anderson, SC!

June 18th, 2012 Sears Homes 11 comments

Recently I was visiting family in Pickens, South Carolina and whilst there, I drove more than 400 miles throughout the Western part of the state, seeking kit homes. Sadly, there are not many kit homes in this part of the country.

However, I did find one city in South Carolina that had several kit homes: Anderson, South Carolina.

And there in Anderson, I found not one but three (and possibly four) kit homes from Sterling Homes (based in Bay City). Better yet, one of those kit homes was Sterling’s crème de la crème - the Vernon.

This was their biggest and best kit home, and this was the first Sterling Vernon that I’ve ever found.

And it was a beauty!

I’d love to know if the owners of this house realize that they have a kit home!

And in addition to the Vernon, I also found a Van Dyke and a Ma Cherie, also from Sterling.

UPDATED:  I’ve identified ANOTHER Sterling Home in Anderson! Click here to read the latest blog!!

To read about the OTHER kit homes I found in Anderson, check back in a few days. I’ll be adding those photos soon.

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The Sterling Vernon was featured on the cover of their 1928 catalog.

The Sterling Vernon was featured on the cover of their 1928 catalog.

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The Vernon was their biggest, fanciest house.

The Vernon was their biggest, fanciest house.

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house

And according to this, it was the house of YOUR dreams!

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Here it is in Anderson, SC.

Do the owners of this "Vernon" know that they have a kit home?

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Close-up on the details.

Close-up on the details.

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Sterling

The Sterling Vernon as seen in the 1928 catalog.

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The Ma Cherie

The Ma Cherie was a beautiful bungalow offered by Sterling. Pay attention to the details around the front porch.

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Anderson

This house in Anderson is a spot-on match to the Sterling "Ma Cherie." And it's in beautifully original condition. Look at the details on the front porch. All the details are perfect.

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Another picture of the Ma Cherie in Anderson.

Another picture of the Ma Cherie in Anderson.

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The Van Dyke was another popular house for Sterling.

The Van Dyke was another popular house for Sterling.

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And

Another beautiful match. This Van Dyke is less than two blocks from the Vernon.

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And this is frustrating! I saw this house in Anderson but neglected to get a photo!

And this is frustrating! I saw this house in Anderson but neglected to get a photo! It was near the other kit homes shown above.

Updated!  This house is at 2309 Edgewood Avenue in Anderson, SC. My kingdom for a photo of this house!!

And this house actually makes FOUR Sterling Homes in Anderson (so the blog title is now in error!).

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How did Anderson end up with so many kit homes from a small company in Bay City, Michigan? It’s a real mystery.

If you have any info to add, please leave a comment below.

To learn more about Sterling Homes, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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“The Lewis San Fernando Looks Its Prettiest When Seen Through a Garden Gate…”

January 12th, 2012 Sears Homes 4 comments

So reads the text in the 1920 Lewis Manufacturing catalog (shown below).

Lewis Manufacturing (based in Bay City), was one of the six national companies that sold kit homes through mail order catalogs. The San Fernando was one of their most popular homes. The houses of Lewis Manufacturing are typically found in the Midwest and in New England. Lewis had a sales office in Syracuse, NY so I’m certain there are many of these Lewis Homes in and around the Syracuse area.

Lewis Homes

Cover of the 1920 Lewis Homes catalog.

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The Lewis San Fernando was one of their most popular designs.

The Lewis San Fernando was one of their most popular designs.

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Nice floor plan, too.

Nice floor plan, too.

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This photo was taken in 2003. Hopefully this house has been repainted, because the purple really does not do it justice. Thats my dear friend Dale Wolicki in the front yard.

This photo was taken in 2003. Hopefully this house has been repainted, because the purple really does not do it justice. That's my dear friend Dale Wolicki in the front yard.

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My buddy

My buddy Dale and I love reading and learning (and writing!) about these old houses! Dale even managed to put himself into a 1920 Lewis Homes catalog!

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Ooh, and heres the info on the Lewis Office in Syracuse!

Ooh, and here's the info on the Lewis Office in Syracuse! This faded text appeared on the front page of this 1920 Lewis Homes catalog, which happens to have been a gift from Dale in 2003.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To read about Addie Hoyt, click here.

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