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Posts Tagged ‘breakfast tables’

The Breakfast Nook: Practical, Useful and Just Darn Cute!

May 21st, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

The other day, my husband told me that he’d like a nook for Christmas.

“I’ve always wanted one too,” I told him excitedly, “but I don’t think there’s room in our kitchen! They sure are cute, aren’t they? And I could pick out some 1950s fabric for the seat cushions.”

Turns out, he was talking about the eReader sold by Barnes and  Noble.

Drat.

Built-in breakfast nooks became wildly popular in the early 1920s and ever moreso in kit homes.  After Dr. Lister’s Germ Theory went mainstream, people couldn’t get out of their massive manses fast enough. The grand Victorian home fell from favor with a resounding thud.

The Bungalow - due to its simple design and germ-killing ease - became America’s Favorite House.

Downsizing a house from 2,500+ square feet to 1100 square feet isn’t easy, and it was the dining room that took one for the team.

Architects dealt with the small spaces by making the best use of every square foot, and no room was designed more efficiently than the kitchen.

The morning meal could now be taken at a built-in table, nestled neatly away in a corner or a specially designed nook. It was an idea whose time had come, and it was also practical and “step saving” (a popular concept at the time). It was easier for the lady of the house to set up and clean off a small table in the kitchen than fiddling with the big fancy wooden table in the dining room.

To read the next fascinating blog, click here.

To read about the exhumation of Addie Hoyt, click here.

My favorite image is from the 1923 Gordon Van Tine catalog. Gordon Van Tine also sold kit homes, and their kitchen nooks were shown in the catalogs - in COLOR!

My favorite image is from the 1923 Gordon Van Tine catalog. Gordon Van Tine also sold kit homes, and their kitchen nooks were shown in the catalogs - in COLOR!

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Not surprisingly, the built-in breakfast table in the grandiose Sears Magnolia was also pretty fancy!  (1921 catalog).

Not surprisingly, the built-in breakfast table in the grandiose Sears Magnolia was also pretty fancy! (1921 catalog). Check out that floor!

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The Sears Ashmore had

The Sears Ashmore was also a pretty fancy house, but this built-in breakfast table is downright pedestrian.

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This floorplan for the Sears Ashmore shows the placement of their nook.

This floorplan for the Sears Ashmore shows the placement of their nook.

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Montgomery Wards offered nooks in their kit homes, too. This photo came from the Montgomery Wards Building Materials catalog.

Montgomery Wards offered nooks in their kit homes, too. This photo came from the Montgomery Wards Building Materials catalog.

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The Sun

In 1921, you could order a built-in breakfast alcove from the Sears catalog for your own home. It was made with quality materials and look at the price!!

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The Sunrise!

"The Dawn" had a unique design, and had to be placed near a window. When the crepuscular rays of the dawn hit the side wall, the table automatically lowered into place.

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Wow

Notice the rays striking the wall where the table was located? Pretty neat, huh?

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Another

In 1935, nooks were still offered - and quite popular.

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This nook appeared in Norwood Sash and Doors Building Materials catalog (1924). Norwood Sash and Door (in Norwood Ohio), supplied a lot of millwork for Sears kit homes.

This nook appeared in Norwood Sash and Door's Building Materials catalog (1924). Norwood Sash and Door (in Norwood Ohio), supplied a lot of millwork for Sears kit homes.

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This nook appeared in the Pacific Ready Cut Homes catalog. PRCH was based in Los Angeles, and they sold about 40,000 kit homes during their 30 years in business. They stopped making kit homes in the late 1930s and started making surfboards.

This nook appeared in the Pacific Ready Cut Homes catalog. PRCH was based in Los Angeles, and they sold about 40,000 kit homes during their 30 years in business. They stopped making kit homes in the late 1930s and started making surfboards.

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Aladdin Homes (based in Bay City, MI) also offered a built-in breakfast nook in their houses.

Aladdin Homes (based in Bay City, MI) also offered a built-in breakfast nook in their houses.

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Even Popular Mechanics offered a built-in breakfast table for their handy readers. But this one had an added benefit.  You could sleep on it.

Even "Popular Mechanics" offered a built-in breakfast table for their handy readers. But this one had an added benefit. You could sleep on it.

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But it really does not look too comfortable.

But it really does not look too comfortable. It was probably an effective deterrent for turning away overnight guests: "Sure, we have room for you! Honey, go fold out the BREAKFAST TABLE for Aunt Sally and Uncle Kermit."

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Ladies Home Journal featured this nook in their 1924 magazine.

"Ladies' Home Journal" featured this nook in their 1919 magazine.

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Last but not least, a real live nook in Greenville, Illinois, in the most perfect Lynnhaven that you ever did see. Note, awesome rooster towels do not convey.

Last but not least, a real live nook in Greenville, Illinois, in the most perfect Lynnhaven that you ever did see. Note, awesome rooster towels do not convey.

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And I must confess, I made all that up about the breakfast table that lowers itself when the sun’s rays hit it.  :)

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About 1920s Breakfast Nooks

November 1st, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

Built-in breakfast nooks were a popular item in the early 1920s and especially so in kit homes. After the grand Victorian home fell from favor, the bungalow craze took over and suddenly The Little House was the best house to have. (As Henry David Thoreau said, “Simplify, simplify, simplify,” and Ralph Waldo Emerson is purported to have responded, “I think one simplify would have been enough.”)

Bungalows were a fine idea whose time had come, but there was one problem: space! Creative builders and architects improvised by creating intimate spaces in small areas, such as a built-in table and matching benches for the morning meal. It was a wonderful idea, and also saved the housewife some work. It was far easier to set up and clean off a small table in the kitchen than frittering away the hours dealing with meal preparation at the formal dining room table.

Below are pictures from catalogs and magazines of the time, showing the breakfast nook of the early 1920s. At the bottom is a picture from a 1919 issue of Popular Mechanics, showing a “convertible” breakfast nook!  Table by day, stiff-as-a-tabletop bed by night.

Hopefully, some history loving old-house homeowners will be able to use these vintage photos to restore the breakfast nooks in their own homes.

To read more about breakfast nooks (and see more pictures), click here.

A little scant in terms of detail, but still cute.

A little scant in terms of detail, but still cute. This image is from the February 1911 Ladies' Home Journal.

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This simple breakfast table was offered with the Sears kit home, The Verona.

caption here too

This fine looking table was offered in the Sears Preston, a spacious Colonial kit home. Note that the benches don't have backs! Nothing says comfort like a hard-plaster wall!

Nook

This page features the breakfast table offered in the Sears Magnolia. These seats have backs!

Breakfast

This "breakfast alcove" came with the Sears home, The Honor.

nookie

The "Pullman Breakfast Alcove" came with your Sears Ashmore. More modest than the others, it has simple benches with no seat backs.

The image below appeared in the June 1919 issue of Popular Mechanics and provided the ultimate space saver. By day, it was a cute little trestle table with matching benches. By night, it was an extra sleeping space for your overnight guests.

nookie ps

Easy to make and simple to use, this "convertible" breakfast table provided extra sleeping space for visitors.

nookie

As seen in the 1919 Popular Mechanics, this breakfast nook could be folded out into a bed. Overnight Guests - it's what's for dinner!

And the real deal - in the flesh - a 1930s breakfast nook as seen in the Sears Lynnhaven in southern Illinois.

Sears caption

Awesome rooster towels not included.

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