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Posts Tagged ‘corey thornton locke’

Orlando in Nebraska

April 4th, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Last year, I was watching the movie “Nebraska” with my daughter Corey, when I asked her to hit pause for a moment. I jumped up, grabbed a camera and took a picture of the tv screen.

My daughter quietly asked, “Sears House?”

Montgomery Ward,” I replied.

We continued with our movie.

As mentioned in a prior blog, I can’t just watch movies or television like normal people. I’m forever looking at the architecture. Doesn’t matter if they’re Sears Homes or not, I like looking at houses. When I was single, I kept hoping to find a dating site that featured pictures of men’s homes, rather than their faces. Some things are so much more important than looks. And then I ended up marrying a guy who lived in a concrete filing cabinet for people.

And then we moved to a fine home after we got married.

Shown below is the house I spotted in the movie “Nebraska.”  As movies go, it was okay, but pretty slow.

However it did have a nice house. Looks like it might be a Montgomery Ward “Orlando.”

Maybe.

To read more about how to identify kit homes, click here.

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This foursquare was featured in the movie "Nebraska" with Bruce Dern

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Dare I hope

Is it a Montgomery Ward Orlando? Might be.

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Montgomery Ward and Gordon Van Tine were one in the same. Montgomery Ward relied on GVT to handle all facets of sales, from catalog publication to order fulfillment. What's the difference between a Montgomery Ward house and a Gordon Van Tine house? Not much. Image above is from the 1918 catalog.

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I love reading this stuff.

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Classic foursquare, with one difference: No entry foyer. Instead, that extra space is used for a small den or first-floor bedroom. Notice also that it has "good-morning stairs" in the kitchen. Nice touch!

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This is the only Orlando I've ever seen, and it's in Beckley, West Virginia.

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My friend Ersela found this house in Beckley. For years, people had said it was a Sears House. They were close!

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To learn more about Gordon Van Tine, click here.

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Teddy The Dog Needs Advice

January 27th, 2015 Sears Homes 11 comments

Frequent visitors to this page will know that Teddy the Dog is a prominent and important part of my life. Yesterday, we returned from another visit to the vet and learned that Teddy is (again) suffering from some type of allergic dermatitis. This time, it’s in her ears.

More medication has been prescribed, but I’m starting to think this is food related. For the last three years, she’s been on Purina One Dog Food. I was suitably impressed that “chicken” was its first ingredient, but I’ve since learned that meat as a first ingredient is not really enough to assure that it’s a quality product.

In fact, this website states that Purina One is a sub-standard product.

I’m posting this here to ask if anyone can recommend a kibble that is ideal for dogs with a tendency toward allergy-based dermatitis.

Teddy and I thank you!

To read more about Teddy, click here.

Interested in reading about identifying kit homes? Click here.

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Doesnt *every* dog have a monogrammed bed from Orvis? :)

Doesn't *every* dog have a monogrammed bed from Orvis? :)

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Teddy has a friend spend the night.

Teddy has a friend ("Roxey") spend the night.

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Teddy was a beautiful baby.

Teddy, at eight weeks. She's being held by my beautiful daughter, Corey.

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The dog days of Teddy.

The dog days of Teddy.

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Teddy and I used to drive out to the old TCC campus (Suffolk) and take a long walk along the edge of the Nansemond River. This is also the site of Pig Point, where unused shells from Penniman were stored.

Teddy and I used to drive out to the old TCC campus (Suffolk) and take a long walk along the edge of the Nansemond River. This is also the site of Pig Point, where unused shells from Penniman were stored.

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This was actually a picture of my freshly painted sunporch, but the worlds most persistent photo bomber appeared.

This was actually intended to be picture of my freshly painted sunporch, but the world's most persistent photo bomber appeared. Apparently, she spotted a squirrel in her back yard.

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During our last episode with dermatitis, I made up this goofy little sweater for Teddy, to keep her from gnawing on the hot spot on her front leg.

During our last episode with dermatitis, I sewed up this goofy little sweater for Teddy, to keep her from gnawing on the "hot spot" on her front leg. It worked well, and it was so darn cute.

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Teddy has always been game for every adventure.

Teddy has always been game for every adventure, even a walk in one of our rare snow storms.

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And shes the consummate house-hunting companion, always on the lookout for kit homes!

And she's the consummate house-hunting companion, always on the lookout for kit homes!

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Thanks for any advice! Please leave a comment below!

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The Sheridan: A Jewel of a Bungalow In the Midst of a 1980s Neighborhood

August 8th, 2014 Sears Homes 3 comments

Last week, I was in the St. Louis area, visiting my precious daughter and her family.

During our time together, we journeyed to Edwardsville, IL. I asked Levi (husband of precious daughter) to take me to a part of Edwardsville where there’s a lake, and he took me to the area around Circle Drive.

A quick glance at the post-Vietnam War houses told me I was in the wrong area, but as we continued around the lake, I spotted a familiar 1920s bungalow.

Taking a closer look, I realized we had found the lone 1920s house in a neighborhood full of very modern houses!

And even better, it was a perfect Gordon Van Tine #612 (also known as The Wardway “Sheridan”)!

Was this the original “Farm House” for that community? Did the original owner of this bungalow sell off 250 acres to create the modern subdivision that now surrounds it? I’d love to know.

The owners have taken good care of this old house, and again, I wonder, do they know that they have something special there?

And if you have any friends in the Edwardsville area, please share the link with them!

To contact Rose, please leave a comment below.

To learn more about kit homes, click here.

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Edwardsville House

The Gordon Van Tine #612 was a spacious, classic bungalow (1926 catalog).

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Dandy floorplan

The #612 had a dandy floorplan and spacious rooms.

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Close-up of the house. Love the porch!

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And here's the GVT 612 in Edwardsville, IL. The home's front door has been moved to the side. It'd be interesting to know if it was built this way, or modified in later yaers. I suspect it was built like this.

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If that side entry is not original to the house, it was certainly done with much care and forethought. And it makes sense, too!

If that side entry is not original to the house, it was certainly done with much care and forethought.

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Close up of the front porch, complete with an electric meter! Note the pattern on the chimney.

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The house has been modified on the side, too, but it's tastefully done.

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Here's a close-up of the catalog image, showing the home's side view

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To the rear of the house is a small addition that was also nicely done.

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Interior of the GVT #612, as seen in the 1926 catalog. Many thanks to Rachel Shoemaker for providing the scanned image!

The Living Room of the GVT #612, as seen in the 1926 catalog. Note the paired windows flanking the fireplace. Many thanks to Rachel Shoemaker for providing the scanned image!

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Sheridan

And here's another beautiful #612 in Northern West Virginia.

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To read more about the Sheridan, click here.

Want to learn how to identify kit homes? Click here.

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A Rare Beauty in Mt. Olive, Illinois

March 2nd, 2014 Sears Homes 23 comments

Last week, I was visiting family in southwestern, Illinois and I had an opportunity to drive to Mt. Olive and meet with Realtor Carol Young who has a Sears Modern Home #118 for sale.

It’s also known as The Clyde, and it is, as the title promises, a real beauty in unusually original condition.

When built, the homeowner (whose name I’d love to know), did a lot of upgrades to the house, such as stained glass, oak trim,  (as is evidenced by these photos).

The house is for sale, and it’s priced well below $100,000. For those of us who live in the big cities, it’s almost incomprehensible that a house this big and this beautiful could be had for such a low price.

Frankly, I’m very surprised a local historical society has not snatched it up. The house is located in Macoupin County, and it’s my hope and prayer that some forward thinking soul in the area will have the vision to buy this house and use it for greater good.

Or perhaps some St. Louis commuter will have the foresight to snatch up this house. It’s less than 45 minutes from downtown St. Louis. It’s a fantastic deal on a wonderful old house in a historic community. I hope someone jumps on it.

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Vote

The #118 in Mt. Olive is a real beauty. Outside, the original siding has been replaced, but inside, it still retains many original features. The house is about 45 minutes from St. Louis. The house was probably built between 1908-1914 (but sadly, that's just an eduated guess).

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the clyde 1916

The Clyde, as seen in the 1916 catalog. The small 2nd floor porch was enclosed many years ago. It's now used as a storage room, which seems like a not-so-good use of space. If I owned this house, I think I'd restore the porch.

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The full catalog page, as seen in the 1916 catalog.

The full catalog page, as seen in the 1916 catalog.

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Nice floorplan, too!

Walk-in pantry has a space for the ice box.

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The spacious front porch with massive columns is one of my favorite features of Modern Home #118

The spacious front porch with massive columns is one of my favorite features of Modern Home #118

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Columns

The front porch (deck, ceiling and columns) is also in very good condition.

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Inside, the house is breathtakingly beautiful.

Inside, the house is really stunning. Note the original transom hardware over the door (all intact and operational) and the original light fixtures in the parlor, dining room (shown above), living room and reception hall.

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The fireplace mantel is gorge

All of the trim throughout the first floor and second floor is solid oak - including the fireplace mantel shown above.

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The details are

The tile work is also incredible.

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The wood trim on the fireplace mantel has been carefully polished through the decades.

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Another view into the dining room (with its bay window). Notice the beautiful plaster work above the oak trim.

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The plaster

The plaster finish on the walls is something I'd expect to see in a 1920s Spanish Revival. I belive it's called a "Sante Fe Finish" and I've also heard it called "Spanish Knockdown." If anyone has a better term for this unusual texture, I'd love to hear it! The faux half-timber look is present on the walls throughout the house, from basement to 2nd floor. The attic is unfinished. It's kind of odd to see this tudoresque treatment present in a trailing-edge Victorian home. That's why I'm so interested in the original owner. Was he a plasterer by trade? Those "beams" are 1/4" oak slats. I've never seen anything quite like it.

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Close-up of one of the original light fixtures.

Almost 100 years of living and yet those original glass globes live on.

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Yet one of my favorite features is this original colonnade.

Yet one of my favorite features is this original colonnade found in the parlor/foyer. And it's a mere $32.00! Thanks to Rachel for supplying this image!

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If you look at the flat spots on the colonnades, you'll see a flared spot, for use as a plant stand (1908).

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The solid-oak Loraine Colonnade, as seen in the 1908 Sears Building Materials catalog.

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Close up of the colonnade.

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Side-by-side comparison of the colonnade.

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Close-up of the corbel on the colonnade.

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An Ionic capital graces the top of the colonnade. Pretty snazzy for $32!

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As you step into the reception hall, it just gets better and better.

As you step into the reception hall, it just gets better and better. That staircase just nooks my socks off.

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And it is all solid oak.

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Stained glass

Neither Rachel or I could find this window in any Sears catalog.

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John Boy

It is not only beautiful, but in wonderful condition.

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Another view of this stunning staircase.

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The foyer also has an original light fixture.

The foyer also has an original light fixture.

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The front parlor (facing the street) also has a beautiful stained glass window.

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That half-timbered effect is present throughout the long hallway of

That half-timbered plaster look is present throughout the long hallway of the 2nd floor. Unfortunately, the shag carpeting is also present throughout the entire house (first and second floor).

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You can get a better idea of the unique plaster with this shot at the top of the stairs.

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Inside the house, you can see the original clapboard, a remnant from the enclosed second floor porch.

On the second floor, on the front of the house, you can see the original clapboard, a remnant from the second floor porch that was enclosed - probably in the 1940s or 1950s.

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And the basement wall

This is the original low wall for the 2nd floor porch. Unfortunately, the shag carpet extends even into this room.

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The bathroom

The bathroom was enlarged and updated, probably sometime in the 1960s, judging by the tub. The original bathroom was very small. This room was about 16' square.

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A permanent staircase

A permanent staircase leads to a very spacious attic. We found several starlings in the attic, and in this photo, you can see the bird lighting on the attic window.

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The kitchen is in a need of a little love, but at least it doesn't have shag carpeting!

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Even the basement

The unique plaster and oak trim is on the basement walls and ceiling.

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Its a real beauty!

It's a real beauty!

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And its less than 45 minutes from St. Louis!

The house in Mt. Olive is less than 45 minutes from St. Louis, Missouri! (Plus, on your way to work, you can find free spare tires along the roadway!).

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And this is the real reason for my trip to St. Louis. My little girl - Corey.

And this is the real reason for my trip to St. Louis. My little girl - Corey. She's here playing a piano for a local church in Alton, IL. We had a lovely visit.

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Want to buy the house in Mt. Olive? Click here.

To learn more about the Sears Homes in Illinois, click here.

Help me find the 9th Magnolia! Click here!

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