Archive

Posts Tagged ‘fargo house’

A Disrespectful Way to Treat a Young Woman’s Death

December 8th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Today, an article ran in the “Lake Mills Leader” (Lake Mills’ newspaper) which reads (and I quote), “Legend has it, Enoch knocked off Addie.”

If a young woman was murdered last week by her husband, would the newspaper editors present the story with such flippancy, and with such an utter lack of respect?

When will Addie Hoyt Fargo - the 29-year-old woman who was allegedly murdered by her 52-year-old husband, Enoch Fargo, be given a modicum of decency and respect by the press in her own home town?

Did Enoch murder my great Aunt? According to Mary Wilson, Enoch’s own granddaughter, Enoch killed Addie. Read more here. (”The History of Lake Mills, 1983, page 274.)

We do know that Addie did not die of diphtheria, as is stated on her death certificate. We do know that Addie’s death certificate was falsified and we do know those involved in the cover-up violated Wisconsin state law when they did not obtain the necessary burial permit. And we know that Addie’s obituary was fabricated. Which begs the question, what happened to Addie 110 years ago, that those present at her death felt they had to falsify documents and create this fantastic cover-up, all in an effort to hide the truth? What was the truth that they were hiding?

And now,  even 110 years after this 29-year-old woman died under a cloud of suspicious circumstances and events, the Lake Mills newspaper still thinks it’s acceptable to treat Addie’s death in a sophomoric, flippant, irreverent manner.

I wonder if they’d feel the same way if this was their relative?

Because Addie is my relative, and I deeply resent their flippancy.

*  *   *

Enoch Fargo and his bride, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896.

Enoch Fargo and his young wife, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896. Addie was 22 years younger than Enoch. According to Mary Wilson (Enoch's granddaughter), Enoch murdered Addie.

*

Addie

Addie in 1894, about two years before she married Enoch Fargo of Lake Mills.

*

Addie married Enoch Fargo.

Enoch James Fargo, who allegedly murdered his second wife. His granddaughter (Mary Wilson) speaks plainly in her book (The History of Lake Mills) when she says, "Enoch shot Addie!"

*   *   *

“The Law Requiring the Report of Dangerous Disease is Observed.” Kinda. Sorta.

October 12th, 2011 Sears Homes 1 comment

Thanks (again) to Mark Hardin, I have now read parts of the “Nineteenth Report of the State Board to Health to Wisconsin” for 1901/1902, which covers the time period during which Addie Hoyt Fargo allegedly died of diphtheria. This report was for the state of Wisconsin, and has a listing of all reports from all health officers in Wisconsin cities, towns, villages and townships. Full text here.

Doctor Oatway was the county health officer at the time. The same Dr. Oatway that attended to Addie as she lay dying from diphtheria.

In this report, he states that there were no deaths from diphtheria in the city in 1901. But wait, how can that be? Addie contracted diphtheria. She died of diphtheria. The death certificate states that, and Oatway certified that the death certificate was true, but this report contradicts the death certificate.

What the heck?

So Addie allegedly died of diphtheria, but Oatway didn’t report her diphtheria or subsequent death to the state (in his report below)? Maybe if there’d been a requirement that murder victims be reported to the state of Wisconsin, he would have remembered to report Addie under that column.

No time for a loquacious blog today, so please read the text  in full, and please leave comments below.

As my beloved brother Ed would say, “This certainly puts another wheel on the wagon…”

Page 15 of this report states that the deceased victims of diphtheria and other communicable diseases were to be placed in “sturdy coffins.” When Addie’s disinterment day arrives, that could be a real blessing.

And the best part, is the last line of this report:  Oatway says that “the laws requiring the issuing of…burial permits are observed.”

Wow, wow, wow.

Guess he’d rather lie to the state than end up in jail?

S

An interesting read. Read the entire article to get an idea of how much he lied. So, does this mean that he FORGOT about Addie, one of Lake Mills' most prominent citizens? Or did his conscience win the day, and refused to state publicly that she died from a disease process?

Please leave comments below. I always learn so much from other people’s ideas and intelligent insights.

*   *   *

An Amazing Discovery in an Old Shoe Box

June 25th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Recently, I’ve learned all kinds of new facts. Click here to read the updated version of this post!

*

Two weeks ago, I cleaned out the apartment at my father’s assisted living facility and found an old shoe box. Inside was a photo album from the late 1800s, full of people that I didn’t recognize. There was only one clue scribbled on the back of one photo (first photo below). It said,  “Enoch and Addie Hoyt Fargo on their wedding day, 1896.”

My great-grandmother’s maiden name was Hoyt, so I figured I had to be related to these folks - somehow.

I thought “Fargo” was the location. Later, I learned it was the last name of Addie’s new husband, and that Enoch was a direct descendant of the same Fargo that started the big bank with his friend Mr. Wells.

I posted the photos on Facebook, asking for ideas or suggestions on where to learn more. That was Friday morning (June 24, 2011). By Friday evening, I had learned a lot, thanks to my friend and local historian David Spriggs. He dug around a bit and found old census records and much more.

Enoch was 20 years older than his second wife, Addie Hoyt. In fact, Addie’s new step-daughters were only two and four years younger than Addie! This was Addie’s first marriage and it would be her last. While still a young woman, she became ill and her cousin came to sit by the bed and take care of her. Enoch apparently took a shine to Addie’s cousin. Six weeks after young Addie died, Enoch married Addie’s cousin who was 40 years younger than Enoch!

There was talk that Addie did not die a natural death, but that Enoch may have helped speed things along because he was in love with the younger cousin.

As to my familial connection, Addie Hoyt and Anna Hoyt were sisters, and Anna Hoyt was my great-grandmother, so Addie Hoyt Fargo was my great, great Aunt.

Thanks to David Spriggs’ amazing sleuthing, I learned that this house is in Lake Mills, WI and is still standing. In fact, it’s now a Bed and Breakfast. Contemporary photos can be seen the B&B’s website.

Last night, I talked with the owners of the B&B and told them about my amazing shoebox discovery! They provided some history on the family and Enoch’s three wives. I still would love to learn when Addie passed on, and when old Enoch passed on.

Enoch Fargo and his bride, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896.

Enoch Fargo and his bride, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896. Addie was 20 years younger than Enoch. This was her first marriage, his second. He had two daughters, the oldest of which was two years younger than Addie. The young woman picture here would have been my great-great Aunt. I wish Uncle Enoch had remembered (or foreknown me) in his will!

*

Addie

When I first started looking at these photos, I thought that Addie had it all. Here she was, a beautiful young woman married to an older wealthy gent. He moved her into the family home, a Victorian manse built in 1881. Hers was a life of wealth, privilege, comfort and opulence - for a time. According to local lore, Addie's death was suspicious, and Enoch was in love with Addie's cousin. The fact that he remarried six weeks after Addie died is more than a little questionable.

Close-up

Addie was a beautiful young woman, but I don't know about that chair. It has a face carved into the arm. That's just a little troubling.

*

Addie in her wedding gown?

Addie in her wedding gown?

*

My favorite photo of all.

My favorite photo of all. I love the detail and the beauty and the opulence.

*

pic

Close-up of the bed. Love that pillow sham!

*

Close-up of my great, great Aunt Addie Hoyt Fargo

Close-up of my great, great Aunt Addie Hoyt Fargo

*

Not sure who this is, but she sure is happy!

Not sure who this is, but she sure is happy!

*

Look at that waist-line!  Good thing I wasnt around then. That wasp-waist thing wouldnt have worked for me. Id have to say that my shape is more reminiscent of an egg than a wasp.

Look at that waist-line! Good thing I wasn't around then. That wasp-waist thing wouldnt have worked for me. I'd have to say that my shape is more reminiscent of an egg than a wasp.

*

These were fancy people living a fancy life. As my daughter Crystal pointed out, even the horse is wearing a doily!

These were fancy people living a fancy life. As my daughter Crystal pointed out, even the horse is wearing a doily!

*

j

I just love it that she's wearing a sailor suit.

*

With a matching cap...

With a matching cap...

*

j

Old Enoch didn't age well.

*

The fam sitting in front of the house in Lake Mills, WI. Enoch is at the top, with Addie below him. Enochs two daughters are Elsie and Mattie.

The fam sitting in front of the house in Lake Mills, WI. Enoch is at the top, with Addie below him. Enoch's two daughters are Elsie and Mattie.

*

close-up

close-up

*

Fluffy plays with Addie

Sylvester plays with Addie. Tweety has been turned into a hat.

*

Talk about a feather in your cap!

Talk about a "feather in your cap!"

*

Unknown person

Unknown person with a snazzy dress.

*

Not sure who this is, either.

Not sure who this is, either.

Tennis anyone?

Tennis anyone?

And the house. Built in 1881, its now known as The Fargo Mansion.

And the house. Built in 1881 by Uncle Enoch, it's now known as The Fargo Mansion.

Another view of The Fargo Mansion

Another view of The Fargo Mansion

If you know any more about these people, please leave me a note!

To read about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

*   *   *