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Posts Tagged ‘houses for sale’

When Real Estate Photos Make Me Laugh Out Loud…

August 24th, 2017 Sears Homes 17 comments

As someone who spends a fair amount of time looking online at real estate listings and photos, I can tell you, some of these photos are real doozies. My favorite site, for ease of use, is Zillow. There are other websites that I frequent, but many of them are so heavy laden with graphics and ads that it bogs down the computer.

The collection below comes from the Hampton Roads area (Southeastern Virginia). Only one of the photos is from outside of this area.

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To learn more about how to identify Sears kit homes, click here.

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This agent - apparently - couldnt be bothered to drive to the site to get interior photos OR exterior photos. This image appears to be a PHOTOGRAPH of a google street view, taken at his computer. At the very least, maybe someone can teach him how to do a screenshot?en from his computer

This image - the only picture available of this house - appears to be a PHOTOGRAPH of a Google street view, taken at a computer screen. At the very least, maybe someone can teach this agent how to do a screenshot?

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And it would seem that this agent was so concerned about all the signs that he/she took this picture (the lone image) from the safety of her car and kept the doors locked.

And it would seem that this agent was so concerned about the "private property" signs that he/she took this picture (the lone image) from the safety of her car. Perhaps someone could teach her how to blot out the car door frame using Photoshop.

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It appears that ET has posed

ET is living in a small house in Southeastern Virginia. And it's for sale. (The house.)

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This is my own photo, taken while I was looking at a house in the Suffolk area.

What's a sunporch without full plumbing?

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From what I can glean, a high-powered rifle and a spray of bullets caused the sink to run away so quickly that it forgot to take the faucet with it.

From what I can glean, a high-powered rifle and a spray of bullets caused the sink to run away so quickly that it forgot to take the faucet with it.

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The ad said two-zone central air.

The ad said two-zone central air.

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Wherever you go in the room, the deers eyes follow you...

Wherever you go in the room, the deer's eyes follow you...

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Seriously.

Seriously.

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Because how better to exhaust a dryer vent.

Because how better to exhaust a dryer vent?

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Yea

Gravity fed gas-pack? Oh wait, that's only going to work for cold air.

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fff

Jiffy-pop ductwork? It's growing so fast, it had to be constrained with a metal band.

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fff

If I was trying to sell a house, and the a/c compressor was in a theft-proof wire cage in the fenced-in yard, I don't think I'd put a picture of that in the listing.

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Speaking of security, this seems like a statement about the neighborhood.

Speaking of safe areas, this seems like a statement about the neighborhood.

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ggg

Doesn't everyone have a water heater in the den (and a washer hook-up)?

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gggg

The sheet-metal ducting on this furnace is very, very busy. The trunk line goes up and over and under the house. Meanwhile, the garage door is shooting laser eyes at the furnace.

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It looks like the appliances and cabinets were in the middle of a wild party when a humanoid opened the door and everyone had to freeze.

It looks like the appliances and cabinets were in the middle of a dance party when a humanoid opened the door and everyone had to freeze.

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8989

Was this used to film a television program? Not sure what to think of the red X.

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If youre going to take a picture of someones undies draped on the sink, you might want to hide from the camera.

If you're going to take a picture of someone's undies draped on the sink, you might want to make sure your image and likeness doesn't show in the mirror.

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Theres a lot happening in this back yard.

This is a very exciting back yard.

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ff

The agent asked the homeowners to step out of the way but forgot about the mirror? Either that, or they're trapped in an inter-dimensional portal and need to be rescued.

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I dont know if this is artistic brilliance or just plain goofy.

Does the hanger convey?

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And they advertised this as a fenced yard...

And they advertised this as a fenced yard...

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And yes, this picture is right-side-up. This is the lone picture that is not in the Hampton Roads area.

Because nothing says "good decorating" like children dangling from the ceiling.

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This is a for sale by owner and its a little unnerving.

It's true that Mom has left for heaven and won't need this house anymore, but can you move the oxygen cannula out of the way before snapping the photos? And please draw a face on the Teddy Bear. Ugh.

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This shot

The elegance of the entry foyer is lost with the potty shot.

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ff

Give me a winning caption on this one, and I'll send you a free book! :D

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To learn more about how to identify Sears kit homes, click here.

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Sears Modern Home #138 in Somerville, NJ

July 7th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

There are several dozen Sears Homes that I have never seen “in the flesh,” but thanks to the kindness of fellow kit house aficionados, I’m “discovering” more of these rare houses. Hopefully by sharing these photos here, more and more of these rare Sears Kit Homes will be discovered.

Some years ago, the Somerville Historic Advisory Committee discovered that they had a Sears Modern Home #138 in their city. The house had been moved years ago (to prevent its being demolished) and yet even now, it’s still in delightfully original condition and even retains its original cobblestone chimney.

Many thanks to Marge Sullivan and the Somerville Historic Advisory Committee (Somerville, NJ) for sending these photos to me, and granting permission to publish them here.

Somerville has an abundance of kit homes. To see the Sears Milton in Somerville, click here!

SMH 128

Sears Modern Home #138 was offered only in the 1913 catalog, according to "Houses by Mail" (a field guide to Sears Homes published in 1985).

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Sears

First floor of the Sears Modern Home #138. Nice-size pantry!

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Sears

Three bedrooms AND a bathroom!

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Sears

Sears #138 in Somerville, NJ. Photo is copyright 2010, Somerville Historic Advisory Committee (Somerville, NJ) and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. This house was moved from another location (in Somerville) and during the move, the cobblestone columns and cheeks were lost, but the fireplace survived the move!

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Nice match!

Nice match to the #138 in Somerville!

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To read about the Sears Milton in Somerville, click here.

To learn more about how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

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So THAT’S What That Little Door is For…

June 7th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

Old houses often contain many mysteries. It’s our 21st Century paradigm (and ignorance of recent history) that makes our old homes seem “mysterious.”

Take ice boxes, for instance. We’re just one or two generations away from these once-modern marvels, and yet most of us baby boomers know little about them! If fact, most post-WW2 folks know very little about day-to-day life in the early 20th Century. Discovering the answers to those “old house mysteries” can be pretty darn fun (and satisfying, too).

During the open house here at Gosnold, someone was puzzled by the funny little door in my home’s pantry. When I explained the purpose of that door, the visitor exclaimed, “I’ve got one of those little doors in my old house, too. I always wondered what that was for!”

The “funny little door” was an access door for the ice man. Back in the day, my pantry was an open back porch. And back in the day, houses had an area in the pantry or kitchen dedicated to the ice box. An exterior access was created for the ice box, so the iceman could deliver fresh ice to the house without traipsing through the house (and ruining a freshly cleaned kitchen floor in the process).

Sawdust was typically used to insulate the ice, so when your 25 or 50-pound block of ice was delivered, it often came with a little mud, some spilled water and a light dusting of sawdust. It was a bit messy.

With a small service door on the rear of the house, the ice man could tromp up on the back porch, open the little service door, then reach in and open the corresponding smaller door on the rear of the ice box, insert the block of ice and be on his way. In some ice box promotional literature and catalogs, this service door was also known as “The Jealous Husband’s Door,” because it eliminated the opportunity for an iceman to socialize with the lady of the house.

As ice melted, the water could be collected in a pan or (in fancier homes), an ice box drain was provided to take the water away. In my house, the old 2″ ice box drain line is still in place. The line exits through the basement wall at about 12″ below grade. Ice box drains were not plumbed into the sewer line because oftimes there would not be enough water to keep the trap filled with water. If an ice box drain was plumbed into the sewer line and the water in the trap evaporated (or was not present for any reason), sewer gasses could end up in the house, and that’s a very bad thing.

I suspect there was a very small reservoir or tank or drain field of some kind to receive the water that drained from the ice box.

Now perhaps there’ll be one less mystery about your old house and that little door.  :)

Ice

"Keep out the iceman" read this ad from a 1915 "Ladies' Home Journal." It would seem the dapper gent with the straw hat and fine shirt is "icing" the box from the outside. While he may not need to enter the house, it's interesting that he's still managing to sneak a peek at the lady of the house.

Ice box

"Hey Baby, It's me, Mr. Kool. What's up? Is the old man around"

What

What this graphic does NOT show is the iceman's panic-stricken face, when he realizes that "the lady of the house" is a zombie who apparently passed on some time ago. Instead of eyes, she has those ominous x's, which can mean only one thing: She's become one of the walking dead and that platter in her dainty hands will soon contain a zombie's favorite meal - Iceman Brains. Scary stuff.

This vintage photo of Gosnold Avenue (from the late 1950s) shows the open back porch and the ice box door.

This vintage photo of Gosnold Avenue (from the late 1950s) shows the open back porch and the ice box door (under the pantry window).

Close-up of door.

Close-up of door.

door

Years ago, our back porch was enclosed and today it's a handy-dandy pantry. Incredibly, the original ice box door remains, just as it was when the house was built in 1925. The room on the other side of this door is the original pantry, which was converted into a half bath about 30 years ago. The corresponding opening on the bathroom side is gone.

door

When you open this door, there's nothing but a piece of plywood on the other side. It creates an interesting (albeit very shallow) cabinet space.

door

Close-up of snazzy (and original) hinges.

To buy Rose’s icebox door, click here.

To read another article about awesome old houses, click here.

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