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Posts Tagged ‘how to find kit homes’

Sears Modern Home #124 in Amherst Can Be Yours!

November 23rd, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

It was 2003 when I saw my first Sears Modern Home Model #124. I’d visited Rebecca Hunter in the Chicago area, and she took me to Crystal Lake to see “an authenticated #124.” It was all very exciting and Rebecca had even arranged for an inside tour. That was a very happy day.

More recently, Pat Kluetz left a comment at my blog that she’d discovered a Sears Modern Home #124 in Amherst, Wisconsin and it was for sale! She was kind enough to leave a link to the site.

Having read the listing, I was surprised to find that the Realtor didn’t mention this is a Sears House. I wonder if they know?

Many thanks to the unnamed Realtor who snapped all these wonderful photos! And thanks to Pat Kluetz for leaving a comment at my blog.

And if anyone wants to know what I want for Christmas…

:)

To see the original listing, click here.

You can visit Marguerite’s #124 by clicking here.

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Beautiful house

My oh my, what a fine-looking house and it's in such wonderfully original condition. It's listed for $175,000 and for those of us living near a coast, it defies belief that a house like this (on 2+ acres) could be purchased at such a low price.

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two crappy computers

This is my favorite photo, for so many different reasons. For one, it really highlights the beautiful condition of this 104-year-old house. Not only does it have original wooden windows, it also has wooden storms. Wow.

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and neither one of them worth a damn

The entire front porch is so inviting. Those white wicker chairs help too.

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Whats not to love about this o

And it even has a private drive. Be still my heart. Santa, are you listening?

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Side view

Sears House. Wisconsin. Two acres of bucolic bliss. Mature treees. Wow.

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house floor plan windows

Look at the size of those eaves! Notice all the windows across the back of the 2nd floor? Make a note of those many windows. More on that later. BTW, is that a ham radio antenna?

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And there are interior views too

And there are interior views too! I suspect that fireplace mantel is not original to the house. That's just not the type of brickwork you'd see in an early 1900s house.

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Staircase

That staircase is a beauty, and a good match to the floorplan.

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Anyone a Green Bay fan

You're left wondering: Who's their favorite football team?

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Sears Modern Home was offered first in the 1908 catalog. The image above is from the Sears Modern Homes 1914 catalog.

Sears Modern Home #124 was offered first in the 1908 catalog. The image above is from the 1914 catalog.

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It last appeared in the 1916 catalog (shown above).

It last appeared in the 1916 catalog (shown above).

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Pre-WW1 kit homes are pretty rare, and yet #124 appears to have been one of their most popular models.

Pre-WW1 kit homes are pretty rare, and yet #124 appears to have been one of their most popular models. With 1930 square feet, this was one of their largest houses.

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1916

Check out that bank of windows on the 2nd floor (by the landing). That's a whole lot of windows.

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Windows

Look at all those windows! The house in Amhurst, Wisconsin is a perfect match - front and rear!

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Fun House 1916

It's an unusual house, but lots of charm!

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What a beauty! Why isnt it being promoted in the listing as a kit house?

What a beauty! And such a good match to the catalog image. Why isn't it being promoted in the listing as a kit house? And you wonder, why would anyone leave this little slice of heaven?

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Sears Modern Home 124 in Crystal Lake Illinois

Here's the first #124 I ever saw, and it's in Crystal Lake Illinois.

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Marguerite

Located in Montvale, New Jersey, this #124 is also in beautiful condition. Those river rock columns are stunning. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Sears Modern Home Taylorville

Even tiny Taylorville, IL has a Sears Modern Home #124.

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Augres Michigan Dale Wolicki

Dale Wolicki found this #124 in Augres, Michigan Check out the river rock on the column bases. Photo is copyright 2012 Dale Patrick Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Lincolnton Georgia  (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

And they're even in the deep South, and with fancy columns! This house is in Lincolnton, Georgia. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Rensselaer New York Realtor ad

Another commenter mentioned this #124 in Rensselaer. New York. Thanks to another unnamed Relator for sharing this photo. This house is lcoated at 913 Washington Avenue and is also for sale.

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house house h Medina Ohio

And Kris left a comment at my other blog on #124, saying that he'd found this house in Medina Ohio.

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1911 Seroco Paint Catalog

Modern Home #124 appeared in the 1911 Seroco Paint Catalog.

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Even though Modern Home #124 was offered only from 1908-1916, it proved to be a very popular house.

Even though Modern Home #124 was offered only from 1908-1916, it proved to be a very popular house.

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And while weve found the 124s in Montvale, Taylorville and Crystal Lake, there are still many MIA!

And while we've found the 124s in Montvale, Taylorville and Crystal Lake, there are still many MIA!

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To see the original listing, click here.

You can visit Marguerite’s #124 by clicking here.

Want to learn more about America’s front porches? Click here.

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Marguerite’s Beautiful and Beloved #124

February 5th, 2014 Sears Homes 7 comments

Last year, Sears homeowner Marguerite Deppert saw my blogs (here and here) on Sears Modern Home #124 and sent me several wonderful photos of her own home, which she had recently purchased in Montvale, NJ.

It’s a real beauty and in gorgeous condition. I wouldn’t be surprised if Montvale has many Sears Homes, due in part to the fact that they’re less than 30 miles from Port Newark, where Sears had a large mill. (Sears had but two mills - one in Cairo, IL and one in Newark, NJ.)

Thanks so much to Marguerite Deppert for sharing these photos with me! I’ve been drooling over them all morning!

To see a wide variety of pictures of Sears Modern Home 124, click here.

Did you know there’s a #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia? Click here to see that.

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Number 124 was gone by 1918 (when Sears Homes were given names), but it seemed to be a fairly popular house. Its certainly distinctive!

Sears Modern Home #124 was gone from the catalogs by 1918 (when Sears Homes were given names), but it seemed to be a fairly popular house. It's certainly distinctive! (1916)

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Marguerites house was even mentioned in the 1916 catalog!

Marguerite's house was even mentioned in the 1916 catalog!

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Spaciosu floor plan.

Some of the older homes have rather "odd" floorplans, but #124 was quite sensible.

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SA

Years ago, Rebecca Hunter and I toured the inside of the #124 in Crystal Lake, IL and that little bathroom shown above was really tucked away under that sloping roof. Interesting, but almost claustrophobic.

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Nice house, and a darn good price!

Nice house, and a darn good price!

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Oh my, what a house!

Oh my, what a house! Even the detail around the chimneys is a match to the vintage image! (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Wow.

The rock border on the driveway is a nice complement to the stone columns. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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phoo

A view from the side highlights that beautiful stone work on the chimney. The two chimneys are covered with stone to the roofline, and then above the roofline, they're brick. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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close up

Close up of those unique details on the front porch. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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house

What a fine-looking house. What a treasure for Montvale. And I suspect Marguerite is one of the happiest homeowners in America! (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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details

Look at those wee tiny second-floor windows tucked up under that porch roof. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

What a beautiful house!

What a beautiful house! Just stunning. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Thanks again to Marguerite for sharing these wonderful photos!

To see a wide variety of pictures of Sears Modern Home 124, click here.

Did you know there’s a #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia? Click here to see that.

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Ann Arbor: An Impressive Ensemble of Kit Homes

March 7th, 2013 Sears Homes 1 comment

Many folks enjoy seeking and finding kit homes, but they’re not sure where to begin. Between Sears, Gordon Van Tine/Montgomery Ward, Lewis Manufacturing, Sterling and Harris Brothers, there were at least a couple thousand designs.

If you want to find kit homes, how do you begin?

Well, this very blog might be an ideal starting point because as it turns out, Ann Arbor has a lovely smorgasbord of “typical” (and very popular) kit homes from Sears, Gordon Van Tine/Montgomery Ward, and Lewis Manufacturing. Take a few moments and memorize these photos, and then see if you can find these houses in your town!

Be forewarned, it’s a lot of fun and highly addictive. Bet you can’t stop at just one!

If you’re able, you might even visit one of these communities that has an abundance of kit homes (as identified by this blog).  Interested in finding such a city? Go to the search box at the top of the page (right side) and type in your state and see what pops up. There are 700 blogs at this site and several thousand photos representing 32 states. That’s a  lot of places!

And what about Ann Arbor? Well, thanks to Andrew and Wendy Mutch, we have a gaggle of photos from that city highlighting the many kit homes. One recommendation: You might want to don a sweater before gazing upon these pictures. Just looking at all those snow-covered houses gives me the shivers!

Thanks to Andrew and Wendy for supplying all these wonderful pictures of kit homes in Ann Arbor.

Did you know that there’s a “Sears Home Group” on Facebook? Join us!

To learn more about Wardway, click here.

Interested in Sears kit homes? Click here.

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The Barrington, as seen in the 1928 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Barrington, as seen in the 1928 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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And heres a beautiful example in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

And here's a beautiful example in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Notice the bracketing for the flower boxes (2nd floor window) is still in place. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Brookwood is similar to the Barrington but theyre different houses. Do you see the difference between the two?

The Brookwood is similar to the Barrington but they have a few minor differences. Do you see the difference between the two? The Brookwood is smaller, and has two living room windows (and the Barrington has three). For a time, I'd get these two confused, and then it dawned on me that "Brookwood" has two syllables and two windows! Barrington has three! This is from the 1933 catalog.

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And heres

And here's a fine-looking Brookwood in Ann Arbor. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Sears Dover was an immensely popular house and easy to identify, thanks to its many unique features (1928).

The Sears Dover was an immensely popular house and easy to identify, thanks to its many unique features (1928).

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Heres a picture-perfect Dover in Ann Arbor.

Here's a picture-perfect Dover in Ann Arbor. You may notice it has two windows down the left side, where the catalog has three. This was a very common alteration. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another beautiful Dover.

Another beautiful Dover in Ann Arbor. However, this house looks really cold. The extra snow shovels on the porch are part of that "chilly look" I suppose. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Crescent was probably one of the top ten most popular designs that Sears offered (1928).

The Crescent was probably one of the top ten most popular designs that Sears offered (1928).

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house

Not only does it have the original windows, but it has the original wooden storm windows too, and even the half-round gutters are true to 1928. Are these original or just high-quality replacements? Tough to know, but they sure do look good. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Rembrandt was one of their finer homes.

The Rembrandt, a classic Dutch Colonial, was one of their finer homes.

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Another perfect match. How cool is that?!

Another perfect match. Note that the windows on the 2nd floor are centered over those paired windows on the first floor. This single detail can help figure out - is it a Sears Rembrandt, or just another pretty Dutch Colonial? Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Sears Puritan was a diminuitive version of the Rembrandt (1925).

The Sears Puritan was a diminuitive version of the Rembrandt (1925).

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Like the Rembrandt, you can study the position of the windows to figure out if its a Puritan or something else. The 2nd floor windows on the Puritan are NOT aligned with the first floor windows.

Like the Rembrandt, you can study the position of the windows to figure out if it's a Puritan or something else. The 2nd floor windows on the Puritan are NOT aligned with the first floor windows. Study this single detail, and it will help you easily differentiate the Puritan from the look-alikes. As with all these houses, also pay attention the chimney placement. Remodelings come and go, but chimneys don't move. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another hugely popular house was the Sears Westly (1919).

Another hugely popular house was the Sears Westly (1919).

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Pretty, pretty Westly in Ann Arbor.

Pretty, pretty Westly in Ann Arbor. Still has its original railings. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Rodessa was a cute little bungalow and very popular! (1925)

The Rodessa was a cute little bungalow and very popular! (1925)

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And this Rodessa is in wonderfully original condition!

And this Rodessa is in wonderfully original condition! Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Hathaway was another popular house (1928).

The Hathaway was another popular house (1928), and distinctive enough that it's easy to identify. Just look at all those clipped gables!

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Ann

Anther very fine match. Sadly, this house has been hit with some permastone (front first floor), but other than that, it's a dandy! Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another fine match

Another fine little Hathaway in Ann Arbor. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Ann Arbor

I wonder if the Realtor knows it's a Sears kit house? Based on my research, more than 90% of the people living in these houses don't realize what they have. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Conway, as seen in the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Conway (also known as "Uriel"), as seen in the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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Another snow-covered example in Ann Arbor!

Another snow-covered example in Ann Arbor! Notice the original bracketing under the oversized front gable, and that "phantom" brick pillar on the far right. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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As seen in the 1928 catalog, The Ashland.

As seen in the 1928 catalog, "The Ashland."

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Ash

Where's a good chainsaw when you need one? Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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As mentioned, in addition to Sears, Ann Arbor also has kit homes from other companies, including Gordon Van Tine/Montgomery Ward, and Lewis Manufacturing.

As mentioned, in addition to Sears, Ann Arbor also has kit homes from other companies, including Gordon Van Tine/Montgomery Ward, and Lewis Manufacturing. Shown above is one of GVT's biggest and bet kit homes, "The #711." Quite a house!

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And what a fine 711 it is!

And what a fine 711 it is! By the way, this was a huge house, measuring 48' wide and 30' deep, giving a total of 2,880 square feet. I have to double check, but I believe this was the largest kit home that was offered by Gordon Van Tine, and size-wise, it's the same as the Sears Magnolia (also 2,880 square feet). Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Gordon Van Tine fulfilled all of the orders for Montgomery Ward (Wardway), and their catalogs were nearly identical. Wardway had a few designs not seen in the GVT catalog, and GVT had a few not found in the Wardway catalog. Shown above is the Wardway Laurel, as seen in the 1929 catalog.

Gordon Van Tine fulfilled all of the orders for Montgomery Ward (Wardway), and their catalogs were nearly identical. Wardway had a few designs not seen in the GVT catalog, and GVT had a few not found in the Wardway catalog. Shown above is the Wardway Laurel, as seen in the 1929 catalog.

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Wlak

That offset front porch is a distinctive feature of the Wardway Laurel. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Laurel as seen from the other side.

The Laurel as seen from the other side. That small side porch is original to the house, and surprisingly - in still open (as when built). Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Devonshire was one of those kit homes that was offered in the Wardway catalog, but not in the Gordon Van Tine catalog. It was on the cover of the 1931 (which was the last) Wardway catalog.

The Devonshire was one of those kit homes that was offered in the Wardway catalog, but not in the Gordon Van Tine catalog. It was on the cover of the 1931 (which was the last) Wardway catalog.

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I just love that the Devonshire in Ann Arbor is painted the same colors as the house on the cover of the 1931 catalog.

I just love that the Devonshire in Ann Arbor is painted the same colors as the house on the cover of the 1931 catalog. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Cranford was another house offered only in the Wardway catalog (1927).

The Cranford was another house offered only in the Wardway catalog (1927).

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I surely do love a house dressed up in pink.

I surely do love a house dressed up in pink. I really do. This Cranford is (like so many of the houses in Ann Arbor) in largely original condition. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Kenwood, as seen in the 1929 Wardway catalog. As with the Cranford and the Devonshire, the Kenwood was exclusively a Wardway home (milled, manufactured and shipped by Gordon Van Tine).

The Kenwood, as seen in the 1929 Wardway catalog. As with the Cranford and the Devonshire, the Kenwood was exclusively a Wardway home (milled, manufactured and shipped by Gordon Van Tine).

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Is this a Wardway Kenwood? />

Is this a Wardway Kenwood? Most likely it is, but the inset door is not a spot-on match. However, this house has had a substitute siding installed, and the door may have been squared off to accommodate the replacement siding. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Perhaps Wardways most popular house, the Priscilla was pretty and practical (1929).

Perhaps Wardway's most popular house, the Priscilla was pretty and practical (1929).

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Crescent

And here's a fine example of the pretty, pretty Priscilla! Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Last but not least is Lewis Manufacturing. They were based in Bay City, so its not surprising to find a kit home from Lewis there in Ann Arbor. The Marlboro was a very popular house for them, and for good reason. It was a real beauty, and a big house!

Last but not least is Lewis Manufacturing. They were based in Bay City, so it's not surprising to find a kit home from Lewis there in Ann Arbor. The Marlboro was a very popular house for them, and for good reason. It was a real beauty, and a big house!

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Ann Arbors very own Marlboro. Sounds a bit poetic, doesnt it?

Ann Arbor's very own Marlboro. Sounds a bit poetic, doesn't it? The offset front door and the tiny closet window beside it are classic defining features of the Marlboro. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

That little closet window is still in place, but it's been partially closed up. Photo is copyright 2012 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Teddy loves learning about kit homes. She spends much of her spare time reading The Mail-Order Homes of Montgomery Ward, and she can be a great help when were out hunting for kit homes.

Teddy loves learning about kit homes. She spends much of her spare time reading "The Mail-Order Homes of Montgomery Ward," and thanks to her tireless studying, she can be a great help when we're out hunting for kit homes. She's not called "Teddy the Wonder Dog" for nothing!

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To order your own copy of the “The Mail Order Homes of Montgomery Ward” click here.

To contact Rose, leave a comment below.

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The Magnificent Milton - And There’s One In New York City!

May 30th, 2012 Sears Homes 8 comments

In Spring 2010, my friend Rebecca sent me a note, asking if I knew about the Sears Milton in Stanley, Virginia. Four months later (August 2010), Hubby and I were standing in the front yard of the Sears Milton.

At the time, the 1,932-square foot house was being used as a Bed and Breakfast. The Milton House Inn website has now been taken down, so apparently, it’s a private residence again.

The house is located on the main drag, and it is an imposing structure in this beautiful (and tiny) town, nestled in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains. (Stanley is about seven miles south of Luray, Virginia and about five hours west of Norfolk.)

The Milton did not appear in the 1912 catalog (or prior years), but I found it in the 1916 catalog. It last appeared in 1919, so its reign was brief. If you’d purchased a Milton in 1916, the price was $1,619 and by 1919, the price had jumped to $2,491, a shocking 54% increase. And, it was not offered as a pre-cut house.

When I was putting together this blog, I was surprised to find (according to an old testimonial) a Milton had also been built in New York City. This is a massive and impressive house, not far behind the Sears Magnolia in terms of grandeur. Its many unique features would certainly make it hard to miss.

Is the Sears Milton still standing in New York City? Boy, I sure would love to know.

What about the Miltons that were built in Fayette, Ohio and Somerville, NJ?  Are they still standing?

In 2008, someone sent me a newspaper article that claimed that the Sears Milton had been built (and torn down) in Carlinville, Illinois. I shared the photo with Rebecca Hunter, and she and I concur: The house in Carlinville (on Route 4) did not appear to have been a Sears Milton.

To learn more about how to identify kit homes, click here.

To read about the Sears Homes in Carlinville’s Standard Addition, click here.

The Sears Milton is a distinctive and unusually large house. Identifying this gem is easier than shooting slow-moving fishies in a wee-tiny barrel.

The Sears Milton is a distinctive and unusually large house. Identifying this gem is easier than shooting slow-moving fishies in a wee-tiny barrel. (1916 catalog)

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Spacious and awesome

That bay window (dining room) is quite large and is one of many identifying characteristics of the Sears Milton. The small windows on the side (flanking the fireplace) are another unique feature, asis the second floor porch with its unusual window placement.

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And as of 1916, several had been built, including one in New York City!

And as of 1916, several had been built, including one in New York City! Pics please?? :)

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Close-up of the house (1916).

Close-up of the house (1916). As mentioned, this house has many unique features, such as the dentil molding, massive eave brackets, tiny attic window set in those deep gables, pergolas, and that massive two-story bay window. That second-story porch (with small windows on either side of the balcony door is also pretty distinctive.

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Here in the flesh

Landscaping prevented a shot that's more akin to the catalog image (as seen above), but there's no doubt about it: This is a Sears Milton. Note the dentil molding atop the columns.

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Straight on

My oh my, that's a fine-looking house! Note the two-story bays on the right!

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Another view

Another view of this wonderful old house.

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From the side

From this angle, you can see those two small windows flanking the chimney.

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Remnants of the rafter tails.

Underneath the flat porch roof are remnants of the old pergola. Note the unique cuts on the rafter tails.

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stanley wow

A view of the Magnificent Milton's front porch.

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Details around the second-story porch.

Details around the second-story porch.

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Comparison

Comparison of the catalog image and the house in Stanley, Virginia.

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To learn more about the Sears Magnolia, click here.

Interested in seeing more photos of Sears Homes in the Blue Ridge Mountains? Click here.

The Miltons in New York, New Jersey and Ohio were built between 1913 -1916. Please leave a comment if you have any clue where these homes might be!

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Modern Home #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia

May 20th, 2012 Sears Homes 8 comments

Last week, I posted photos of Sears Modern Home #124 in different parts of the country. Rachel Shoemaker then discovered that there was another “Model 124” in Lincolnton, Georgia and she sent me a link with a photo.

I sent a couple inquiries out, asking if anyone near Lincolnton could get some photos for me. Steve and Teresa Howland responded and said, “Sounds like a fun project. We’ll get a photo for you!”

And then yesterday, after I returned home from my five-day trek to North Carolina, I found a plethora of beautiful photos in my email, courtesy of Steve and Teresa Howland.

As I’ve always said, all the nicest people love old houses and history.  :)

And these are wonderful photos!

To read the previous blog about Sears Modern Home #124, click here.

To hear Rose’s recent interview on WUNC (with Frank Stasio), click here.

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

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The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty!

The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty! And look at how even the brick chimneys are a perfect match! Most likely, the Ionic columns were not original to the house, but are replacements. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And our view

This photo really shows off that dramatic overhang on the third-floor. I'm not sure why anyone would design a house with this feature. Is there a tangible benefit or was this done for appearance's sake? Because it's a pretty odd feature! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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As I said, these photos are wonderful! Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia.

Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And looking straight on!

And looking straight on! I think this is her best angle! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Awesome details around the door!

Awesome details around the door. I am still puzzled by those columns. Are they wood or cement? They're pretty substantial looking. The bracing on the underside of the eaves was not original to the house. These were often added to support the oversized eaves, which sometimes sag with age. Who among us doesn't understand the angst of having our once-sturdy eaves start to sag a bit? (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Look at the details!

Look at the details! I'm not sure what the purpose of that little hole was, but it's an interesting little feature. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Wow!

Wow! Now that's a good match!! And a beautiful photo, too! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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So, there are more of these!  Do I have any readers in these cities?  :)

So, there are more of these! Do I have any readers in these cities? :)

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And last but not least, a heart-felt thank you to Steve and Teresa Howland for driving out to Lincolnton, Georgia and taking the time to get such wonderful photos!  As is evidenced by the last photo above, they did a first-rate job in getting the angle just right, so it’s a perfect match to the original catalog page!

Thanks Steve and Teresa!

To learn more about kit homes, click here.

To read another blog that showcases another “random act of old house kindness,” click here.

To listen to my favorite “Georgia” song, click here.

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And Then There’s Sterling Homes…

July 13th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Sterling was one of the six national companies selling kit homes through a mail-order catalog. Like Aladdin, Sterling Homes was based in Bay City, Michigan. While Sterling was successful in selling their kit homes nationwide, they were a much smaller company than Aladdin or Sears. To learn more about Sterling, click here.

Pictured below is the catalog page for the Sterling Homes “Browning-B.” The “B” is usually a reference to a different floorplan for the same house design. (Despite looking through my reference materials, I never did find a “Browning-A.)

Compare the catalog page with the extant homes below. The roof on the back of the house doesn’t drop down near as far as the front. And look at the pair of gabled dormers, connected by the small shed dormer. Most interesting is the bay window on the front of the house, next to the front door.

Sterling

From the Sterling Homes catalog.

Sterling

There are several of these models in Hopewell's downtown area, interspersed with Aladdin kit homes. Is this the Sterling "Browning B"? It sure is a perfect match. The only flaw is the size of the eaves on the dormer window. Everything else is perfect, and that's remarkable, because this is a very unique house.

Aladd

Another Sterling Browning-B in Hopewell? Appears to be!

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Sterling

A close-up of the house as it appeared in the catalog.

Another one

Side-by-side comparison of the two houses.

Another Sterling Browning B in Hampton, Virginia

Another Sterling Browning "B" in Hampton, Virginia? It certainly looks very close, and yet it appears to be a little bigger (deeper) than the other Sterling Homes (above). The rest of the details (see below) are a very, very good match.

The homes left side is a perfect match to the catalog page.

The home's left side is a perfect match to the catalog page.

Sterling

Pretty unique house!

d

Floorplan shows that over sized bay window on the first floor, which is an unusual feature for a house of this size. Both the house in Hopewell and Hampton also have this. The second floor sure has a lot of doors!

Very unusual arrangement around the dormer windows, too.

Very unusual arrangement around the dormer windows, too. Also a perfect match to the original catalog image.

Sterling

Detail around those funky dormers (catalog).

Even the rafter tails are a spot-on match!

Even the rafter tails are a spot-on match to the Sterling catalog.

Thanks to Pat Spriggs for driving me all over Hampton!

And thanks to Mark and Lisa Hardin for finding the Hopewell Brownings!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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