Archive

Posts Tagged ‘hoyt’

Christmas at the Fargo Mansion

December 12th, 2012 Sears Homes 1 comment

It’s been about a year since I last stayed at the Fargo Mansion Inn in Lake Mills, Wisconsin but the many fond memories of that visit still remain. Many folks in that small, picturesque village showed me so many kindnesses. And two of the kindest, most sincere people I met during that trip were Tom Boycks and Barry Luce, owners of the Fargo Mansion Inn.

Were it not for these two, the 7,500-square foot Queen Anne mansion would have been reduced to several tons of construction debris at the county landfill. It was slated for demolition when they stepped in and bought it, sans heat, plumbing and electricity.

It’s been 25 years since those two saved this house, and today, it’s hard to imagine what Lake Mills would look like without this most impressive manse.

Since purchasing the solid-brick, 112-year-old house, Barry and Tom have poured their heart and soul (and a lot of money) into a thoughtful and thorough restoration. Visiting this house should be high on your “bucket list.” To make a reservation, click here.

The Fargo Mansion first came into my life in Summer 2011, shortly after my father’s death. Amongst his things, I found two old photo albums. One of the albums had an inscription: “Merry Christmas, Wilbur.”

Wilbur was my great-grandfather, but who was Addie Hoyt Fargo? Well, that’s a long story. To learn more about Addie Hoyt, click here.

To see pictures of Addie’s House, all dressed up for Christmas, scroll down!  (Thanks to Jan Vanderheiden for the photos!)

To read about Addie’s special Christmas present to Wilbur in 1900, click here.

To reserve a room at the Fargo Mansion (and see more gorgeous photos), click here.

*   *   *

Addies house as it appeared in 1896, soon after a major remodeling.

Addie's house as it appeared in 1896, soon after a major remodeling.

*

This beautiful house underwent a major remodeling in 1895 and 1896. Today, its a nationally known B&B. Addie would be proud!

This beautiful house underwent a major remodeling in 1895 and 1896. Today, it's a nationally known B&B. Addie would be proud! (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

*

Inside, Tom and Barry have done a beautiful job of decorating the house for the holidays.

Inside, Tom and Barry have done a beautiful job of decorating the house for the holidays. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

*

Addie also did a fine job of decorating, back in 1896.

Addie also did a fine job of decorating, back in 1896. This photo faces the same corner as the contemporary photo shown above. Sadly, that newel post light ("Our Lady of the Naked Light") disappeared in the intervening decades.

*

Tom and Barry love this old house, and it really shows.

Tom and Barry love this old house, and it really shows. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

*

Addie loved her house, too.

Addie loved her house, too. In the background, you can see that massive staircase and reception hall. Look at the fretwork and heavy curtains over the doorways.

*

house

I love the vintage toys at the base of the tree. This tree sits at the base of the staircase. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

*

house house

Notice the magnolia leaves on the Electrolier!

*

photo

When my father died in June 2011, I found this photo album buried in an old nightstand. Apparently Addie gave this to her brother-in-law Wilbur Whitmore for a Christmas gift.

*

Heres a picture of Addie with her older sister, Anna. Anna (born 1866) married Wilbur and moved to Denver. Wilbur and Annas families were both from Lake Mills and theyre my great-grandparents.

Here's a picture of Addie with her older sister, Anna. Anna (born 1866) married Wilbur and moved to Denver. Wilbur and Anna's families were both from Lake Mills and they're my great-grandparents.

*

Wilbur and Anna about the time of their engagement (late 1880s).

Wilbur and Anna about the time of their engagement (late 1880s).

*

To learn more about the Hoyts, click here.

*   *   *

Who is Addie to Me?

November 29th, 2011 Sears Homes 6 comments

One of the questions I’m most frequently asked is, “How are you related to Addie?”

When I gave my talk in Lake Mills on September 4th, I explained that I didn’t even know I had an Aunt Addie until my father died in June 2011. While I was cleaning out his apartment, I found two photo albums in beautiful condition from the late 1890s. One photo was marked with this inscription:  Enoch and Addie Hoyt Fargo on their wedding day, 1896.

After the dust settled from my father’s funeral, I sent an email to my friend David Spriggs and asked for his help in solving this mystery. Within a few hours, he’d figured it out.

So, how am I related to Addie?

My great-great grandfather was Homer Hoyt, born in Vermont in 1841. In the early 1860s, he moved to Lake Mills, and met the woman who’d become my great-great grandmother, Julia Hawley Hoyt.  (Julia Hawley Hoyt was the daughter of a salty old sea dog, Captain Hawley.)

In my genetic history, we have an amazingly strong trait known by some as the “pack rat” trait. And while I’m personally a big fan of the anti-clutter club, I have to say, I’m very grateful that for 150 years, my family has been hanging onto these photos.

First, my favorite photo.

Captain Hezekiah Beech Hawley in 1874. According to family lore, he was a salty sea captain, and he surely does look the part. This would have been Addies grandfather!

Addie's maternal grandfather: Captain Hezekiah Beech Hawley in 1874. According to family lore, he was a salty sea captain, and he surely does look the part.

*

And his wife, Teresa Hathaway Hawley (also 1874). This would have been Addies grandmother on her mothers side.

And here's a picture of the captain's wife, Teresa Hathaway Hawley (also 1874). This would have been Addie's grandmother on her mother's side.

*

Homer Hoyt at age 17 (late 1850s or early 1860s)

Homer Hoyt was Addie's father, and he was my great-great grandfather. He's pictured here at age 17 (about 1858). Homer was from Vermont, but by the early 1860s, Homer had moved to Lake Mills, where he met Julia Hawley. They were married about 1864.

*

Homer in 1888

Homer Hoyt in 1888. He would have been about 47 years old here. Homer died in 1894 at the age of 53. He's buried in Washington State, but has a memorial marker in the Lake Mills cemetery. Note the masonic emblem around his neck.

*

Julia Hawley Hoyt in 1888.

Julia Hawley Hoyt in 1888. She was Addie's mother. Homer (pictured above) and Julia had three children: Anna, Addie and Eugene. Julia died a few months after Homer, in January 1895. Addie married Enoch 13 months after her mother's death.

*

Egue

Eugene was the baby of the family and was born in 1875. He never married and never had children. He lived in Lake Mills for a time (in his adulthood), but after Addie's death, he left the area. He became an itinerant machinist and traveled around the Midwest looking for work. That's a surprise actually, because this guy doesn't look like an itinerant machinist. Eugene looks like someone who became a fancy tailor or a French chef. Nice tie.

*

My great-grandmother (right) was Anna Hoyt Whitmore. Shes pictured here with her sister, Addie. Addie would have been about 15 in this photo (born 1872) and Anna would have been 21.

My great-grandmother (right) was Anna Hoyt Whitmore. She's pictured here with her sister, Addie (Ada) Hoyt. Addie (born January 22, 1872) would have been about 15 in this photo and Anna (born December 1, 1866) would have been 21. Anna lived to be 99 years old. Addie did not.

*

Anna met and married a fine young gent named Wilbur Walter Whitmore and married him in the late 1880s. Theyre pictured here shortly before their marriage. Wilbur was reputedly a fine and decent fellow. He was also my great grandfather. It was Wilbur to whom Addie sent that photo album in Christmas 1900.

Anna met a fine young gent named Wilbur Walter Whitmore and married him in the late 1880s. Soon after their marriage, they moved to Denver, where they remained for the rest of their married lives. They're pictured here shortly before their marriage. Wilbur was reputedly a fine and decent fellow. He was also my great grandfather. It was Wilbur to whom Addie sent that photo album in Christmas 1900. Judging by this photo, one would have to say that Anna and Wilbur were a pair of swingers!

*

Wilbur

Great-grandfather Wilbur W. Whitmore and I share a birthday: July 4th. He and Anna were married until his death in 1939. After Wilbur died, Anna moved to Santa Monica to live with her daughter (my grandmother) Florence Whitmore Fuller. He worked for the railroads and was a skilled negotiator.

*

Addie

Addie in 1894, about two years before she married Enoch Fargo of Lake Mills.

*

Addie married Enoch Fargo.

Addie married Enoch Fargo in 1896, and remained in Lake Mills until her death in 1901. Addie and Enoch did not have any children. Enoch had three daughters by his first wife, Mary Rutherford. Two of them survived to adulthood, and also had children.

*

Ernie

My great -grandmother Anna Hoyt Whitmore had three children with Wilbur; Ernie (shown above), Victor, and Florence (my grandmother). Ernie was six years old in this photo, and he died shortly after this picture was taken. He was born in 1888 and died in 1894.

*

In 12 months time, Addie mourned the loss of her little nephew (six year old Ernie, above), and then her father (1894) and then her mother (1895). And in February 1896, she married Enoch Fargo.

In June 19, 1901, Addie died under suspicious circumstances.

*

m

Florence Whitmore was Anna's daughter, and she married a tall thin gent named Edgar Atkinson Fuller. Florence is pictured here in 1922. Florence was born in 1891.

*

Baby Boys in 1919

Florence and Edgar had only two children: Thomas Hoyt Fuller (left) and Edgar A. Fuller, Junior (right). The twins were born June 13, 1919. Thomas Hoyt Fuller was named after his grandmother's side of the family. Florence's brother Victor never had children, and Ernie died at six years old. The twins were the only great-grandchildren of Homer and Julia Hawley Hoyt.

*

later

This photo - from 1922 - shows Wilbur and Anna Hoyt Whitmore taking their twin grandsons out for a ride. My father is sitting with Wilbur and my Uncle Ed is sitting with his maternal grandmother, Anna Hoyt Whitmore (Addie's sister).

*

F

Thomas Hoyt Fuller (left) and Edgar Atkinson Fuller (right) about 1943.

*

The Fuller Twins in 1982.

The Fuller Twins in 1979. My father (Thomas Hoyt) is on the left.

*

F

After Thomas Hoyt Fuller came home from the war, he married Betty Mae Brown of Berkeley (who'd served as a WAVE in WW2) and they had four children.

*

Mom

Betty Mae and Tom Fuller in 1960.

*

Dad

I'm pictured here with my father and three brothers, Rick, Tommy and Eddie at the Hoover Dam (1966). Notice my eldest brother Tom has a shirt made of fabric that matches my short little dress. My mother was an accomplished seamstress, and often made our clothes.

*

On June 10, 2011, my father died, three days shy of his 92nd birthday.

On June 10, 2011, my father died, three days shy of his 92nd birthday. It was while I was cleaning out his apartment in an assisted living facility that I found the photos of Addie and Enoch Fargo. (Photo is courtesy of Dave Chance and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

My father (Thomas Hoyt Fuller), had four children, of which I am one. My Uncle Ed had two daughters, one of whom has passed on. My cousin and my three brothers and myself are the only great-great grandchildren of Homer and Julia Hoyt.

To read more about Addie, click here.

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

* * *

Was Aunt Addie Poisoned With Arsenic?

July 9th, 2011 Sears Homes 11 comments

Was Addie poisoned by her husband, Enoch Fargo?

Her remains are in Milwaukee being autopsied, and we’ll soon know for sure.