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Posts Tagged ‘kit homes in ohio’

Be Still My Heart - A Carroll!

September 20th, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Way too often folks will tell me, “We’ve got dozens of those little Sears kit homes in our city,” and when I ask, “How do you know that?” the response is always the same: “You can just tell by lookin’ at ‘em! They’re the square boxy little things.”

Oh man.

That’s one of those comments that’s grown fairly wearisome (and worrisome).

For more than 15 years, I’ve been mired in this niche topic and I can say with some authority, you can not identify Sears Homes thusly.

The Sears “Carroll” is a classic example of this. It’s hard to define the specific housing style of the Sears Carroll, but I’d say it’s a splash of Modern and a heaping helping of Minimal Traditional. In short, it’s not one of those “square boxy little things.”

Perhaps it’d be easier to just say - it’s a unique house and yet is most certainly is a Sears kit home.

Thanks so much to Mary Perkins for sharing the photos of her “Carroll” in Cincinnati.

Enjoy the photos.

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The Carroll, as shown in the 1932 Sears catalog.

The Carroll, as shown in the 1932 Sears catalog.

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Ive been traipsing around the country for a long time, but have never seen a Carroll in the flesh.

I've been traipsing around the country for a long time, but have never seen a Carroll in the flesh. The Perkins' home in Cincinnati is "flipped" and the mirror image of the floorplan shown above.

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2ds

Upstairs, there are three good-sized bedrooms, and double closets in two bedrooms.

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House

The Carroll was offered in 1932 and 1933.

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Thanks

Now that's one fine-looking house, and it's a Sears House! Mary (the home's happy owner) says that her husband found authenticating marks on the lumber in the attic. This Carroll was built in 1932. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

Another view of Mary's "Carroll" - before it's most recent paint job. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The homes rear is also a good match to the Carrolls floorplan.

The home's rear is also a good match to the Carroll's floorplan, and there's a small addition to the kitchen. If you go back and look at the floorplan (above), you'll see that the 2nd-floor bathroom extends a little bit beyond the first floor's footprint. By the way, that does NOT appear to be a Sears & Roebuck hot tub. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Perkins added this dreamy solarium to the house.

The Perkins' added this dreamy solarium to the rear of the house. Mary said that there was no delineation between the living room and the original sunroom (as is shown in the floorplan above). Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Perkins bought the house in 1987, and it was shortly thereafter that a neighbor told them it was a Sears kit house.

The Perkins bought the house in 1987, and it was shortly thereafter that a neighbor told them it was a Sears kit house. The wood trim in the dining room and living room retains its original varnished finish. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

A lovely view of the Carroll's original batten door (unpainted, thank goodness) and what appears to be an original light fixture. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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In the Carrolls living room, the Perkins did some repair work to the existing brick fireplace and added this beautiful Walnut mantel.

In the Carroll's living room, the Perkins did some repair work to the existing brick fireplace and added this beautiful Walnut mantel. Photo is copyright 2015 Mary Perkins and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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House

What a fine-looking house - from front to back and top to bottom!

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Thanks again to Mary Perkins for sharing these photos.

To read more about Sears Homes in Ohio, click here.

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The Meadow-Moor: Supersedes The Commonplace!

January 25th, 2015 Sears Homes 4 comments

What a month! Two weeks ago, an elderly friend took a bad fall and I’ve been spending a little time helping her “get back on her feet” - literally and figuratively! Between that, and trying to write a book about Penniman (which is 100 years old in 2015), it’s been a very busy time.

Last year, my buddy Dale Wolicki sent me these wonderful photos of a rare Sterling “Meadow-Moor” that he discovered in Rocky River, Ohio. I’ve never seen a Meadow-Moor and according to Dale, this is the first one he’s seen, too!

Thanks to Dale for sharing his photos!

Enjoy the pictures, and please leave a comment below.

To visit one of Dale’s websites, click here.

To learn more about Sterling Homes, click here.

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The Lewis Meadow-Moor (1914 catalog).

The Sterling Meadow-Moor (1914 catalog).

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Spacious, too!

Spacious, too! Love the "cupboard buffet" and Solarium.

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More

Back in the day, the 2nd floor bathroom (usually the only bath) ended up on the front.

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Hus

I'd spend my whole life on that sunporch.

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hoouse

Still has its thatch-effect roof, too! What a cream puff of a kit house! Photo is copyright 2014 Dale Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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To visit one of Dale’s websites, click here.

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Sometimes, They’re Hiding Right By Your Biscuits…

April 5th, 2013 Sears Homes 6 comments

Having lived in Norfolk for seven years now, I have scoured every street in this city, searching for mail-order kit homes. I’ve ridden around with several friends, studied maps, queried long-time residents and harangued my husband and I was quite certain that I’d seen every early 20th Century neighborhood that Norfolk had to offer.

Wednesday night, my buddy Milton and I were on our way to CERT class, and we swung by Church’s Fried Chicken to buy some of their world-famous honey biscuits. For reasons I can’t explain, an integral part of the CERT class is a pot-luck supper. (We’re  expected to bring a piquant and palatable platter of something wonderful to these weekly classes.)

As we pulled out onto Virginia Beach Blvd, I noticed a lovely Dutch Colonial staring back at me.

“Huh,” I thought to myself. “That Dutchie has an interior chimney,  just like the Martha Washington (Sears Home). Isn’t that something?”

And then I noticed that it had the curved porch roof, just like the Martha Washington.

And then I looked again and thought, “And it’s got those short windows centered on the second floor, just like the Martha Washington.”

Next, I looked at the small attic window and thought, “And it’s got that half-round window in the attic, just like the Martha Washington.”

As Milton drove down the road, I twisted my head around and saw that the Dutchie had the two distinctive bay windows on the side, just like the Martha Washington. Those two windows are an unusual architecture feature, and that was the clincher.

“Whoa, whoa, whoa,” I told Milton. “I think that’s a Sears House.”

Now anyone who’s hung around me for more than 73 minutes knows that I’m a pretty big fan of Sears Homes, and my friends understand that a significant risk of riding around with Rose is that there will be many detours when we pass by early 20th Century neighborhoods.

Milton gladly obliged and gave me an opportunity to take a long, lingering look at this Dapper Dutchie.

That night at the CERT meeting, I kept thinking about the fact that one of the most spacious and fanciest Sears Homes ever offered was sitting right here in Norfolk, and after seven years of living in this city, I just now found it.

The next day, Milton picked me up around 11:00 am and we returned to the Sears Martha Washington so that I could take a multitude of photos. Sadly, as we drove through the adjoining neighborhoods, we saw that the nearby college (Norfolk State) had apparently swallowed up great gobs of surrounding bungalows.

Between that and some very aggressive redevelopment, it appears that hundreds of early 20th Century homes are now just a dusty memory at the local landfill.

Do the owners of this Martha Washington know what they have? Based on my research, more than 90% of the people living in these historically significant homes didn’t know what they had until I knocked on their door and told them.

What a find! What a treasure! And it’s right here in Norfolk!

So is there a Magnolia hiding somewhere nearby?  :)

To learn more about the kit homes in Norfolk, click here.

To learn how to identify marked lumber, click here.

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The Martha Washington was a grand and glorious house.

The Martha Washington was a grand and glorious house. According to this page from the 1921 catalog, it had seven modern rooms. I wonder how many "old-fashioned" rooms it had?

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According to this

Here's a Martha Washington that was featured in the back pages of the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog. This house was built in Washington, DC, and shows the house shortly after it was finished.

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This line drawning from the 1921 catalog shows the

This line drawing from the 1921 catalog shows those two bay windows on the side.

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This was described as a snowy white kitchen de Lux.

This was described as a "snowy white kitchen de Lux." For its time, this really was a very modern kitchen. Notice the "good morning stairs" too the right, and the handy little stool under the sink. According to a 1928 Sears Modern Homes catalog, the "average woman spends 3/4ths of her day in the kitchen." So maybe that's why she got a hard metal stool to sit on at the sink?

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Oh may

"Judge for yourself how attractive, bright and sanitary we have made this home for the housewife." And a "swinging seat"! I guess that's a desperate attempt to make kitchen work seem more recreational, and less like drudge work.

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CheckAn “exploded view” shows the home’s interior. That baby-grand piano looks mighty small!

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Second

Check out that bathtub on the rear of the house. And that's a sleeping porch in the upper right. Again, that furniture looks mighty small.

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As you can see from the picture (1921), this was a fine home!

As you can see from the picture (1921), this was a fine home!

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Be still my quiveringg heart!

Be still my quivering heart! And it's right on Virginia Beach Boulevard!

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A view from the side.

A view from the side, showing off those bay windows.

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The PVC fish scales over the porch are a pity (and do a fine job of hiding the beautiful fan light),

The PVC fish scales over the porch are a pity (and do a fine job of hiding the beautiful fan light), and the badly crimped aluminum trim on that porch roof doesn't look too good, and the wrought-iron is a disappointment, but (and this is a big but), at least it's still standing.

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Before

The porch, in its pre-aluminum siding salesmen and pre-wrought-iron and pre-PVC state.

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compare

A comparison of the Martha Washington in DC with the house in Norfolk!

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And heres a Martha Washington in Cincinnatti, Ohio.

And here's a Martha Washington in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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To learn more about the Martha Washington, click here.

To learn more about biscuits, click here.

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The Frangible Fosgate or The Diminuitive Delevan?

May 26th, 2012 Sears Homes 4 comments

The Fosgate and Delevan were two very similar houses offered by Sears in the early 1920s. At first glance, I thought they were the same house, but after looking at the floorplan, I saw that the Fosgate was a little bigger than the Delevan.

And the Fosgate was “Standard Bilt,” while the Delevan was “Honor Bilt.”

Honor Bilt” was Sears’ best. “Standard Bilt” was pretty flimsy, and not suited for extreme weather or longevity.

The Delevan was 22′ by 22′ (pretty tiny), and the Fosgate was 24′ by 24′ (a little less tiny).

As a point of comparison, the Delevan was the size of my den. And the bedrooms in this house were the size of many walk-in closets.

To learn more about the difference between Standard Bilt and Honor Bilt, click here.

Want to learn how to identify Sears Homes? Click here.

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"Nice and cozy" is one way of describing a house with 480 square feet (1920).

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house

Holy moly, look at the size of the bedrooms. And the bathroom! Not enough room in there to change your mind! (The Delevan, 1921 catalog).

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test in 1920 catalog and the above was 1920

Now this is a real puzzle. If you look at the houses on Gamble Street in Shelby, there are no Delevans. This insert appeared on the page with the Delevan (see above, just beside the home's floorplan). And yet, there on Gamble Street you'll see a Sears Fullerton. What exactly did Mr. Thornill build?

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this is from the 1925 catalog

The Fosgate appeared in the 1925 catalog. As you can see, it looks a whole lot like the Delevan. The lone obvious difference (from the outside) is that the Fosgate does not have a window in that front bedroom, where the Delevan DOES. The Fosgate is also two feet longer and wider, and it is "Standard Bilt" compared to the Honor Bilt Delevan.

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1921 Fosgate

The Delevan was a pricey little affair in 1921. The year before, it was a mere $696.

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Lacon Illinois Sears Fosgate or delevan

Located in Laconic Lacon, Illinois, is this a Fosgate or a Delevan? My first impression is that it's a Fosgate (because of the width).

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Cindys photo

Located in Ohio, this little house appears to be the Fosgate, because it's missing that bedroom window on the side. The front porch has certainly been embellished. (Photo is copyright 2012 Cindy Catanzaro and can not be used or reproduced without permission.)

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Cindys photo

Same house, different angle. You can see the kitchen window at the rear. (Photo is copyright 2012 Cindy Catanzaro and can not be used or reproduced without permission.)

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Cincinnatti Donna Bakke

Is this the Fosgate or the Delevan? Judging by the width, I'd *guess* it's the Delevan, but it's mighty hard to know for sure. (Photo is copyright 2012 Donna Bakker and can not be used or reproduced without permission.)

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To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn about Addie Hoyt Fargo, click here.

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The Halfway House, by Sears & Roebuck

April 22nd, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

In 2002, someone called to tell me that they had a Sears House.  (This was way back in the day when my business cards included my personal phone number.)

The caller said, “I live in Washington, DC and I own a Sears Home.”

I asked if she knew which model it was.

She replied, “I sure do. It’s the Halfway House.”

“The Halfway House?” I asked, hoping I’d merely misunderstood.

“Yes, that’s right,” she said.

I asked if she could spell that for me, and she did. I had heard her correctly the first time.

I knew that Sears sold “The Morphine Cure,” in the early days (a patent remedy for breaking a morphine addiction),  and I knew that Sears offered “The Heidelberg Electric Belt” (guaranteed to restore men’s “vitality”).

But I was not aware that Sears had offered any 12,000-piece reformatory kit houses.

I asked the caller to send me a photo. A few days later, a picture arrived in the mail. It was a picture of the Sears Hathaway.

Sears Hathaway (1921 catalog).

Sears Hathaway, first offered with two bedrooms. (1921 catalog).

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It was also offered in a three-bedroom model (1928).

In later years, they offered in a three-bedroom model (1928).

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Floorplan

The third bedroom was created by adding that little bump to the right rear.

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Sears Hathaway in Elmhusrt Illinois

Sears Hathaway in Elmhurst Illinois - in brick!

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Perfect little Hathaway in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Perfect little Hathaway in Cincinnati, Ohio. I'm guessing the address is 1627 but I suppose it could also be 1267 (or 2716 in some Mideastern countries). (Photo is copyright 2012 Donna Bakke and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Another Cincinnati Hathaway, courtesy of Donna Bakke.

Another Cincinnati Hathaway, courtesy of Donna Bakke. Not sure why it has two doors. Surely this tiny house has not been turned into two apartments! (Photo is copyright 2012 Donna Bakke and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Sears Hathaway in Wyoming, Ohio.

Sears Hathaway in Wyoming, Ohio. (Photo is copyright 2012 Donna Bakke and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And heres a Halfway House in Hampton!

And here's a Halfway House in Hampton, Virginia!

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My favorite Hathaway is this one in Newport News, Virginia.

My favorite Hathaway is this one in Newport News, Virginia. It still has its original lattice work on the porch! Every detail is perfect.

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Comparison of the two images.

Comparison of the two images.

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Look at the details on the porch!

Look at the details on the porch!

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And compare it to the original catalog picture!

And compare it to the original catalog picture!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn about Addie Hoyt, click here.

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