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Posts Tagged ‘let’s go to buckroe’

Gordon Van Tine #611: Unusually Well Planned

April 2nd, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

These last few months, I’ve been doing a proper survey of kit homes in Hampton, Virginia. I went out yesterday to check one last section one last time (which I’ve now visited twice), when this handsome bungalow jumped out of the bushes and called my name.

This Gordon Van Tine Model #611 is on a main drag (300-block of North Mallory) which leaves me scratching my head. How did I miss it?

That will remain one of the great mysteries of the universe, together with, where did I put my husband’s truck keys.

To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

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Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

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One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

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What a house!

Notice how the porch roof sits within the primary roof. Interesting feature.

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Oh yeah, baby! :D

Sadly, some vinyl siding salesman has pillaged the house, but other than that, it's a nice match. The railings have been replaced, but that's a relatively minor affair.

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Good match on this side, too!

Good match on this side, too!

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So

And did I mention it's on the main drag? :)

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To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

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Let’s Go to Buckroe! (Hampton, Virginia)

March 16th, 2015 Sears Homes 6 comments

Last week, my friend Cynthia (a fellow old-house lover!) drove me around Hampton, Virginia searching for kit homes from the early 20th Century. We had a wonderful morning and a lot of fun, but after 3-1/2 hours, I was worn out!

We visited several early 1900s neighborhoods, but found nothing remarkable, and then we went to the Buckroe area. (Having been raised in Hampton Roads, I remember a little ditty from a radio advertisement: “Let’s go to Buckroe!” Advertising must be a powerful medium because I haven’t heard that jingle in 40 years, but still remember it clearly. And yet I couldn’t find it on youtube or google. Strange.)

I’d been through the Buckroe section before, but apparently, I’d missed the sweet spots. With Cynthia’s help, I found a surfeit of Sears Homes I’d never seen before.

Check out the photos below for a real treat, and if you know anyone who loves old Hampton, please send them a link to this blog! :)

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In the early 1900s and into the 1960s, Buckroe Beach was a happening place. This photo is from www.gardenrant.com, and published by Susan Miller.

In the early 1900s and into the 1960s, Buckroe Beach was a happening place. I'm not sure what happened to Buckroe, but the area by the beach is now open field. I'm told that Buckroe Amusement Park was closed in 1985 and torn down in 1991. What a pity. This photo is from www.gardenrant.com, and is copyright Susan Miller.

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To see more vintage pictures of Buckroe, visit Susan’s website here. Lots of wonderful pictures.

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While driving down Seaboard Avenue, I spotted this darling little cottage and asked Cynthia to back up so I could get another look.

While driving down Seaboard Avenue, I spotted this darling little cottage and asked Cynthia to back up so I could get another look. Note the three windows down the side? That caught my eye, as did the cut-out shuters.

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Oh my stars, its a Sears Claremont!  (1928)

Oh my stars, it's a Sears Claremont! (1928)

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Such a pretty little thing.

Such a pretty little thing. And other than the door, it's perfect!

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I thought about asking Cynthia if we could come back after dark and steal the shutters. It was tempting. And yes, theyre original too!

I thought about asking Cynthia if we could come back after dark and steal the shutters. It was tempting. And yes, they're original too! As are the Cypress shakes on the exterior.

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Cute, isnt it? And such a nice match.

Cute, isn't it? And such a nice match.

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Less than a block away on Seaboard, this Lewiston was just waiting to be discovered. That's the car window in the upper right of the frame. Oopsie.

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The Lewiston, as seen in the 1930 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Lewiston, as seen in the 1930 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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Also found this pretty thing in the 900-block of North Mallory.

Also found this pretty thing in the 900-block of North Mallory.

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Its a Sears Somerset, looking much like the day it was built.

It's a Sears Somerset, looking much like the day it was built.

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Aladdin was a company which, like Sears, sold entire kit homes through mail-order.

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This is an Aladdin Madison with an altered front gable.

Just around the corner on Atlantic Avenue, I found this Aladdin Madison with an altered front gable. Due to the trees, you can't see the side, but that little bumpout is present on the far right of the home (just as it should be).

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Here's a close-up of the Aladdin Madison from the 1931 catalog.

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Heres a photo from the Hampton Assessors website.

Here's a photo from the Hampton Assessor's website. In this photo, you can see that bump-out on the side, and also see how that front gable started life as an arched entry.

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Last but not least is the Fullerton. Id found this house in the Buckroe area several months earlier, but this time, there was no big red truck parked in the front yard, making it far easier to get a good shot of the house. This is in the 200-block of East Taylor.

Last but not least is the Fullerton. I'd found this house in the Buckroe area several months earlier, but this time, there was no big red truck parked in the front yard, making it far easier to get a good shot of the house. This is in the 200-block of East Taylor.

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What a nice match!

What a nice match, right down to the flared columns!

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To see an earlier blog I did on the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

To see more vintage pictures of Buckroe, click here.

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Jupiter Two and The Twins: Together Again

June 19th, 2014 Sears Homes 5 comments

Last week, I wrote a blog about The World’s Most Beautiful Light Fixture, purchased from a quaint little antique store in Pheobus (Hampton).

When I purchased that chandelier, I noticed that the store also had two matching sconces. They were just stunning, and a perfect complement to the chandelier, and yet there was one major impediment: I didn’t currently have any sconces in my dining room.

As I held the World’s Most Beautiful Wall Sconces in my quivering hands, I thought about this hard truth:  If I purchased these two beauties, I’d have to hire an electrician to install wiring for sconces.

More money. More hassle. More aggravation. More work.

Drat.

I put the sconces down and walked away.

I didn’t get very far.

I returned to the sconces and stroked their cool, coppertone-colored cones. I sighed softly as I pondered their magnificent beauty, once installed and fully illuminated. I closed my eyes and pictured them sharing their light and warmth with the world.

I couldn’t stand it. Plus, I couldn’t bear the thought of separating them from The Mother Ship.

I asked the shop dealer if he’d be willing to make me a deal if I purchased all three items (chandelier plus two sconces). There was some haggling and we settled on a price - $230 for the lot of it.

Yesterday, the electrician came and the sconces were restored to life and light.

Beautiful doesn’t begin to describe it!

:)

To read more about The World’s Most Beautiful Light Fixture, click here.

To read a blog about 1950s kitchens, click here.

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Lovingly nicknamed, Jupiter Two this is the chandelier I purchased last week when Cynthia and I visited a little shop in Pheobus.

Lovingly nicknamed, "Jupiter Two" this is the chandelier I purchased last week when Cynthia and I visited a little shop in Pheobus.

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It was Milton who observed that it looked a bit like Jupiter Two (the spaceship the Robinsons flew in Lost In Space.

It was Milton who observed that the new light fixture looked a bit like Jupiter Two (the spaceship the Robinsons flew in "Lost In Space").

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Voila!

Jupiter Two and the Twins! Together again, and connected with LOVE (and 120 volts)!

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They look right at home, dont they?

They look right at home, don't they?

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I learned

I learned that these are called "Bow Tie Sconces."

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And I love the fact that they cast light in two directions. Very practical.

And I love the fact that they cast light in two directions. Very practical.

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They even look good when theyre sleeping!

They even look good when they're sleeping!

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The electrician had a young helper named Tommy. When Tommy first saw the sconces, he said, Wow, theyre like antiques! And I said, Well, not really. Theyre from the late 1950s, and he said, Wow, they really are antiques!  I took umbrage at that. I almost found myself saying, Young man, that means that *I* am an antique!!

The electrician had a young helper named "Tommy." When Tommy first saw the sconces, he said, "Whoa, they're like antiques!" And in a flawed attempt to point out that they were not *that* old, I said, "Well, they're from the late 1950s," and he said, "Wow, they really *are* antiques!" I almost found myself saying, "Young man, that means that *I* am an antique!!"

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I also had this light fixture installed on the other wall (in the hallway) to light up this notoriously dark space.

I also had this wall sconce installed on the other side of the dining room wall (in the hallway) to light up this notoriously dark space. This $10 Lowes fixture is just saving a space for the other bowtie sconce - that I hope to find SOON!

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So pretty!!

So pretty!! Now, to find some 1950s wallpaper! :)

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To read more about The World’s Most Beautiful Light Fixture, click here.

To read another blog about 1950s and kitchens, click here.

Just One More Post on the 1950s…(Maybe Two)

June 11th, 2014 Sears Homes 8 comments

I keep saying that, don’t I?

Fact is, there was a lot of cool stuff going on in the 1950s. Turns out, many of the finest people I know were born in the 1950s.

I had lunch with one of them yesterday. Cynthia and I strode through the streets of greater downtown Phoebus (Hampton, Virginia) peeking in windows and visiting shops and pretending to be flatlander tourists.

Personally, I am highly allergic to shopping of any kind, but I must say, our adventure was great fun and most memorable.

One of our stops was Cody’s Lighting and Repair on E. Mellen Street. Inside, there were hundreds of vintage lighting fixtures spanning the whole of the 20th Century, but my heart stopped when I gazed upon a coppertone hanging light behind the old-fashioned glass counters.

Several months ago, I did a little work on my kitchen and bath, returning them to the 1950s. Even since then, my dining room (situated between the kitchen and bath) has been feeling a deep sense of shame with its anachronistic post-1970s light fixture. I could hardly bear to walk through the dining room for the lugubrious moans wafting from its walls.

It was troubling.

I knew - as soon as I gazed upon that coppertone light fixture at Cody’s - that my dining room could now re-join its merry 1950s compatriots.

I couldn’t whip out that VISA card fast enough.

For the rest of my visit with Cynthia, I was having a little trouble concentrating because I kept thinking about The World’s Most Beautiful Mid-Century Modern Coppertone Hanging Light Fixture. It was a happy distraction.

Whilst driving home from Hampton with the new (old) fixture in my back seat, I called my buddy Milton and asked him if he was busy.

Poor Milton has come to recognize that this is a very dangerous question when asked by moi, and one needs to be cautious with their response.

“What do you have in mind?” he gingerly asked.

“I’m going to surprise Wayne with a new light fixture I just bought!”

Milton started laughing, and not only did he agree to help with the install, but he went to my house at once and started unhooking the old fixture to make way for the new.

Less than 30 minutes later, The World’s Most Beautiful Mid-Century Modern Coppertone Hanging Light Fixture was suspended from my dining room ceiling.

The dining room emitted an audible sigh of relief.

To read more about the Atomic Powder Room, click here.

To see cool car ads from the 1950s, click here.

Ooh, click here to read an update!  :D

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When the dining room was remodeled in 1979, this light fixture was installed. Now I realize that some peopel will say, OOOH, how pretty!

Blech. This fixture was installed in the late 70s (before my watch). I realize that some people will say, "Oh, how pretty!" but I'm not one of those people. It overpowered the small dining room, and it was not period appropriate. Plus, each of the ten sockets had a 60-watt bulb in it, so for brightness, it was the equivalent of 1,000 suns. When entering the room, one had to be careful to NOT gaze directly at it, lest they be blinded for several days. The good news is, when I put it on Craigs' List for FREE, I was inundated with responses.

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In my eyes, this is a beautiful light fixture for my 1962-built ranch.

TA-DA!!! What a pretty fixture! Those fins on the side cast a lovely pattern on the walls.

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It's a great old house and now it has a great old dining room light!

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The soft glow of a satisfied room.

The soft glow of a satisfied light fixture.

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And it has a cool pattern on the glass shade!

And it has a cool pattern on the glass shade!

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And the pull-down feature works, too!

And the pull-down feature works, too!

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After it was installed, Milton stepped back to admire it and said, You know what? It looks just like Jupiter Two.  Took me a minute and then I realized, he was right.

After it was installed, Milton stepped back to admire it and said, "You know what? It looks like 'Jupiter Two." Took me a minute and then I realized, he was right. It does!

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It *does* look a bit like Jupiter Two! (And if youre from the 1950s, youll know what that means!)

It *does* look a bit like Jupiter Two! (If you're from the 1950s, you'll know what that means!)

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To read about Sears Homes, click here.

What the heck is Jupiter Two?

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