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Posts Tagged ‘mail order house’

Richard Nixon’s Childhood Home in Yorba Linda, California

April 15th, 2016 Sears Homes 1 comment

Every now and then, I get a call about someone famous who grew up in a Sears kit home.

In 2009, I was contacted by a big-deal rock star (through his representative). This musician wanted to know if the house he’d grown up in was a Sears kit house! That was a lot of fun, but I also made a promise to not disclose their identity, so that takes some of the zing out of the whole affair!

In 2004, someone called and asked me to help identify Richard Nixon’s birthplace home in Yorba Linda, California. I was  honored and flattered and excited! I’m sorry to say I don’t remember her name, but she identified herself as an historian trying to document the origins of Nixon’s childhood home in Yorba Linda.

After studying every catalog in my possession and seeking help from my buddies, Rebecca Hunter and Dale Wolicki, I came up with a big zero.

We kinda sorta decided that the house probably came from the Pacific Ready-Cut Homes company (based in Los Angeles), but honestly, we just didn’t know for sure. Sometimes, the passage of time helps answer the hard questions, as new materials become available and knowledge expands.

That has not been the case with Nixon’s home. We have many catalogs for Pacific Ready-Cut Homes (thanks to Dale), but nothing within those catalogs shows a house like this. Based in Los Angeles, Pacific Ready Cut Homes sold more than 40,000 kit homes, and like Sears, they started selling houses in 1908. It’s possible that Nixon’s house came from an early PRCH catalog (which are scarce as hen’s teeth).

Here’s what we do know:

Richard M. Nixon was one of four sons born to Frank and Hannah Nixon. According to the legend,Frank Nixon built this house in 1913 from a kit on his citrus farm in Yorba Linda, California. Nixon and his family lived in this house until 1922, when they moved to Whittier.

While reading up on this house, I stumbled across a wonderful website with many glorious photos.

To learn more about Pacific Ready Cut Homes, click here.

The photo below came from www.Jackassinahailstorm.com, a wonderful website which I highly recommend!

House

Despite much searching, I was never able to identify the origins of this little cottage.

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To learn more about Pacific Ready Cut Homes, click here.

The photo shown above came from www.Jackassinahailstorm.com, a wonderful website which I highly recommend!

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Finding the CUSTOMIZED House That Sears Built, Part V

February 25th, 2016 Sears Homes No comments

Fellow Sears House Hunter Carey Haeufgloeckner found this one-of-a-kind customized Sears House in Canton, Ohio by doing a search at the local courthouse for mortgage records. It’s one of many ways to find Sears Homes, and one of the better ways to find a customized Sears kit house.

The grantee records will show a conveyance of the house to Sears (or one of their trustees) as security for the note (or loan). The grantor in this case is the homeowner, who’s conveying a security interest to the mortgage holder (Sears).

And this customized Sears House is less than four blocks from the Sears Magnolia in Canton!

Carey found a build date of 1924 for the customized house, and the Sears Magnolia was purchased sometime in 1922, so it raises the question: Was the homeowner awestruck by the magnificent Magnolia, and decided that he wanted his own glorious Sears House?

While I’m the one penning the words for this blog, it is in fact Carey Haeufgloeckner who has done all the legwork, research and photography. If you’re in Canton, and would like to know more about kit homes, Carey is an incredible resource!

Thanks so much to Carey for providing the material for this blog!

To read about the Magnolia in Canton, click here.

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When Carey first shared these photos, I wasnt sure what I was looking at. It has the dormer from a Sears Hamilton and a front porch reminiscent of the Sears Ardara, but other than that, it really isnt close to matching any of the 370 designs of Sears Homes.

When Carey first shared these photos, I wasn't sure what I was looking at. It has the dormer that's a bit like the Sears Hamilton and a front porch reminiscent of the Sears Ardara, but other than that, it really isn't close to matching any of the 370 designs of Sears Homes. Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Its a fine-looking and spacious home

It's a fine-looking and spacious home and even looks good in snow! Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

Carey got good shots from every angle! Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The owners told Carey that it was modeled after the Sears Lexington. Shown here is a Sears Lexington in Glen Ellyn (near Chicago).

The owners told Carey that it was modeled after the Sears Lexington. Shown here is a Sears Lexington in Glen Ellyn (near Chicago).

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The Sears Lexington (shown here from the 1921 catalog) might not look like a good match to the house in Canton - at first glance, but...

The Sears Lexington (shown here from the 1921 catalog) might not look like a good match to the house in Canton - at first glance, but...

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I can see many similarities.

The Canton house is seven feet wider (43' wide per the auditor's website) and two feet less deep (22 feet), but the interior layout is apparently pretty close (but flipped in the Canton house).

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The second floor is also a good match.

This house (in Canton) was built with the rooms reversed!

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If you put

If you compare the home's rear with the floorplan and "reverse it," you can see the windows are all a good match. That small window next to the three living room windows is the half-bath. See those double windows next to the half bath? I suspect the homeowners chose not to go with the grade entry shown above. The next opening is the kitchen window.

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The second flloor

On the second floor, you can readily see those two small windows for the oversized landing.

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That dormer looks a lot like it came from the Hamilton or Starlight.

That dormer looks a lot like it came from the Hamilton or Starlight. Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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See what I mean?

It's similar, not identical.

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And the front porch is impossible to peg, but its a bit reminiscent of the Sears Ardara.

And the front porch is impossible to peg, but it's a bit reminiscent of the Sears Ardara. Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Kinda sorta, but the Canton house has a more dramatic flip!

Kinda sorta, but the Canton house has a more dramatic flip!

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When I was a child, Id ask my mother if I looked like my siblings and shed say, No I dont think so. You look just like YOU! This house doesnt really look like any of its siblings either!

When I was a child, I'd ask my mother if I looked like my siblings and she'd say, "No I don't think so. You look just like YOU!" This house doesn't really look like any of its siblings either! But it surely is a lovely home in its own right. Photo is copyright 2016 Carey Haeufgloeckner and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Thanks so much to Carey for providing the material for this blog!

To read about the Magnolia in Canton, click here.

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Finding the CUSTOMIZED Houses that Sears Built, Part IV

February 13th, 2016 Sears Homes 3 comments

Recently, I posted several images of a customized Sears House in Glen Ellyn that we found earlier this month. Subsequently, Rachel managed to find a slew of high quality photos online, at Keller Williams Realty Company (Glen Ellyn), so it’s with a hopeful heart that they’re willing to have those photos shared here, in the interest of history. And maybe also in the interest of good publicity!

As mentioned in a prior blog, we found this house thanks to a rare document that was recently discovered, authenticating several massive and grand “kit homes” with designs and building materials from Sears. These houses were featured in Sears & Roebuck literature, promoting the company’s architectural services.

As with the other customized Sears Home we found, this house in Glen Ellyn was also owned by a high-ranking Sears employee, who started at Sears in the 1910s and remained with the company for many years.

Assessor records indicate that this house was built in 1930, and has five bedrooms and four baths.

Again, a warm thanks to Keller Williams Realty Company in Glen Ellyn for permitting me (and/or forgiving me) the use of these photos.

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

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Oh my, what a glorious home in Glen Ellyn! This house came from Sears & Roebuck and both the design and building materials came from Sears.

What a beauty in Glen Ellyn! Both the design and the building materials were ordered from Sears.

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It would appear that there have been additions put on the homes rear.

It would appear that there have been additions put on the home's rear.

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The entry foyer is stunning!

The entry foyer is stunning!

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It seems likely that this is the homes original (1930s) bathroom.

It seems likely that this is the home's original (1930s) bathroom.

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I think theyve done a little updating on the kitchen.

I think they've done a little updating on the kitchen.

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Since it originally looked something like this...

Since it originally looked something like this...

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And probably had these accoutrements as well.

And probably had these accouterments as well.

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The

The living room is quite grand.

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The homes entry way

The home's entry way does have a decided "Sears Flavor"!

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It looks a lot like the entry on the Sears Jefferson in Carbondale, Illinois.

It looks a lot like the entry on the Sears "Jefferson" in Carbondale, Illinois.

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And to think it came from a mail-order catalog.

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Again, a warm thanks to Keller Williams Realty Company in Glen Ellyn for permitting me (and/or forgiving me) the use of these photos.

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

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Sears Modern Home #124 in Amherst Can Be Yours!

November 23rd, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

It was 2003 when I saw my first Sears Modern Home Model #124. I’d visited Rebecca Hunter in the Chicago area, and she took me to Crystal Lake to see “an authenticated #124.” It was all very exciting and Rebecca had even arranged for an inside tour. That was a very happy day.

More recently, Pat Kluetz left a comment at my blog that she’d discovered a Sears Modern Home #124 in Amherst, Wisconsin and it was for sale! She was kind enough to leave a link to the site.

Having read the listing, I was surprised to find that the Realtor didn’t mention this is a Sears House. I wonder if they know?

Many thanks to the unnamed Realtor who snapped all these wonderful photos! And thanks to Pat Kluetz for leaving a comment at my blog.

And if anyone wants to know what I want for Christmas…

:)

To see the original listing, click here.

You can visit Marguerite’s #124 by clicking here.

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Beautiful house

My oh my, what a fine-looking house and it's in such wonderfully original condition. It's listed for $175,000 and for those of us living near a coast, it defies belief that a house like this (on 2+ acres) could be purchased at such a low price.

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two crappy computers

This is my favorite photo, for so many different reasons. For one, it really highlights the beautiful condition of this 104-year-old house. Not only does it have original wooden windows, it also has wooden storms. Wow.

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and neither one of them worth a damn

The entire front porch is so inviting. Those white wicker chairs help too.

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Whats not to love about this o

And it even has a private drive. Be still my heart. Santa, are you listening?

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Side view

Sears House. Wisconsin. Two acres of bucolic bliss. Mature treees. Wow.

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house floor plan windows

Look at the size of those eaves! Notice all the windows across the back of the 2nd floor? Make a note of those many windows. More on that later. BTW, is that a ham radio antenna?

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And there are interior views too

And there are interior views too! I suspect that fireplace mantel is not original to the house. That's just not the type of brickwork you'd see in an early 1900s house.

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Staircase

That staircase is a beauty, and a good match to the floorplan.

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Anyone a Green Bay fan

You're left wondering: Who's their favorite football team?

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Sears Modern Home was offered first in the 1908 catalog. The image above is from the Sears Modern Homes 1914 catalog.

Sears Modern Home #124 was offered first in the 1908 catalog. The image above is from the 1914 catalog.

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It last appeared in the 1916 catalog (shown above).

It last appeared in the 1916 catalog (shown above).

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Pre-WW1 kit homes are pretty rare, and yet #124 appears to have been one of their most popular models.

Pre-WW1 kit homes are pretty rare, and yet #124 appears to have been one of their most popular models. With 1930 square feet, this was one of their largest houses.

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1916

Check out that bank of windows on the 2nd floor (by the landing). That's a whole lot of windows.

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Windows

Look at all those windows! The house in Amhurst, Wisconsin is a perfect match - front and rear!

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Fun House 1916

It's an unusual house, but lots of charm!

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What a beauty! Why isnt it being promoted in the listing as a kit house?

What a beauty! And such a good match to the catalog image. Why isn't it being promoted in the listing as a kit house? And you wonder, why would anyone leave this little slice of heaven?

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Sears Modern Home 124 in Crystal Lake Illinois

Here's the first #124 I ever saw, and it's in Crystal Lake Illinois.

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Marguerite

Located in Montvale, New Jersey, this #124 is also in beautiful condition. Those river rock columns are stunning. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Sears Modern Home Taylorville

Even tiny Taylorville, IL has a Sears Modern Home #124.

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Augres Michigan Dale Wolicki

Dale Wolicki found this #124 in Augres, Michigan Check out the river rock on the column bases. Photo is copyright 2012 Dale Patrick Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Lincolnton Georgia  (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

And they're even in the deep South, and with fancy columns! This house is in Lincolnton, Georgia. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Rensselaer New York Realtor ad

Another commenter mentioned this #124 in Rensselaer. New York. Thanks to another unnamed Relator for sharing this photo. This house is lcoated at 913 Washington Avenue and is also for sale.

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house house h Medina Ohio

And Kris left a comment at my other blog on #124, saying that he'd found this house in Medina Ohio.

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1911 Seroco Paint Catalog

Modern Home #124 appeared in the 1911 Seroco Paint Catalog.

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Even though Modern Home #124 was offered only from 1908-1916, it proved to be a very popular house.

Even though Modern Home #124 was offered only from 1908-1916, it proved to be a very popular house.

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And while weve found the 124s in Montvale, Taylorville and Crystal Lake, there are still many MIA!

And while we've found the 124s in Montvale, Taylorville and Crystal Lake, there are still many MIA!

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To see the original listing, click here.

You can visit Marguerite’s #124 by clicking here.

Want to learn more about America’s front porches? Click here.

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Eskimo Pies and Something Like the Aladdin Villa!

September 4th, 2015 Sears Homes 4 comments

It’s been known by different names: “Peacock Plantation” (in the 1960s) and more recently, “Bishop Manor Estate.”

I like to think of it as, “The Eskimo Pie House.”

The home’s builder and first owner was Fred Bishop. A transplanted Chicagoan, Fred built this house and estate in St. Elmo, Alabama, in the hopes of building a first-class dairy operation in the South. It was his hope to make and market high-quality ice cream.

As a natural consequence of this, he produced one of the greatest inventions the world has ever known: The Eskimo Pie. According to local legend, people came from far and wide to sample the tasty concoction.

Now that’s a house with a good heritage.

When the Great Depression hit, people stopped buying ice cream and Eskimo Pies and Fred lost his estate in foreclosure. The house passed through many hands and in 1985, it ended up on the National Registry of Historic Places.

At first glance, Fred’s house looks a like an Aladdin Villa, but the Villa didn’t appear until the 1916 catalog.  According to the 1960s brochure (see below), Fred Bishop started construction on his home in 1915. If that’s a good build date (and that’s a big “if”), that raises a whole bunch of questions. However, the National Registry Application gives a build date of 1925. Was that a completion date, or a build date?

If this is an Aladdin Villa, it’s been fancied up quite a bit, with a curved interior staircase, basswood paneling, cherry balustrade and marble fireplace mantle. Plus, the floorplan is not a good match to the Aladdin Villa, but “customization” was common in these grand old kit homes.

And there’s this: Fred and his family were from Chicago. They would have been well familiar with kit homes.

The only photos I’ve been able to find of this house are from the 1985 National Registry application, and studying those photos leave me scratching my head. Is this a Villa? More likely, I suspect there’s a pattern book version of the Aladdin Villa, running around out there and that Fred’s house was probably based on that plan book version.

It’d be fun to find out more about this interesting old house!

If you know anything about The Bishop Manor, please leave a comment below.

To learn more about the Aladdin Villa, click here.

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The Aladdin Villa was first offered in the 1916 catalog.

The Aladdin Villa was first offered in the 1916 catalog (1919 catalog shown).

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A 1960s brochure gives quite a bit of information on the house. Image is credit 2014 some kind soul on Facebook who was a member of a the Lost Alabama group and Ill be darned if I can find their name now. Hopefully, theyll stumble across this blog and give me their name so that I can give proper credit.

A 1960s brochure gives more information on the house. Credit for this image is 2014, via some kind soul on Facebook who was a member of a the "Lost Alabama" group and I'll be darned if I can find their name now. Hopefully, they'll stumble across this blog and give me their name so that I can give proper credit.

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F

The back side of the brochure is full of historical information on the old house. For credit and reprint information, please see above.

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The National Registry information shows a floor plan for Freds house.

The National Registry information shows a floor plan for Fred's house.

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The floorplan (1919 catalog) has some significant differences.

The floorplan (1919 catalog) has some significant differences.

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Heres a picture of an Aladdin Villa in Roanoke Rapids, NC.

Here's a picture of an Aladdin Villa in Roanoke Rapids, NC.

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The Villa is in Scotland Neck, NC.

The Villa is in Scotland Neck, NC.

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Freds house - as seen in the 1985 National Registry Application.

Fred's house - as seen in the 1985 National Registry Application.

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Shown from the side.

Shown from the side.

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An extensively customized Villa in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.

An extensively "customized" Villa in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Photo is copyright 2013 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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In conclusion, I suspect there’s a pattern book version of the Aladdin Villa, running around out there and that Fred’s house was probably based on that plan book version.

If you’ve got a notion, please leave me a comment!

To see the rest of the photos of this beautiful old estate in Alabama, click here.

Eskimo Pie - Yummy!

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Where Are You, My Little Gingersnap?

August 25th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

Sometime in the late 1990s, my then-husband and I visited this Aladdin Magnolia at a Sunday open house. We were living in Alton, IL at the time, and often we’d visit open houses in the area - purely for sport.

Of course, in the 1990s, I didn’t know much about kit homes, and it was in 2013 when I first noticed this “Aladdin Magnolia” in the 1953 Aladdin catalog (shown below) and realized that I’d visited this very house many years prior.

Since 2013, I’ve been to the St. Louis area four times, and each time, I have scoured the streets - sometimes block by block - hoping to find this little darling. When I was finished, my old Garmin was awash in blue stripey marks, showing where I’d traveled.

And yet - no Aladdin Magnolia.

If you happen to stumble upon my little gingersnap, please tell this house that I’ve been looking for her for a long time. I’ve even shown the photo to Teddy, but she tells me that she needs a ride to St. Louis if she’s going to offer any substantive help.

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The Aladdin Magnolia, as seen in the 1953 catalog.

The Aladdin Magnolia, as seen in the 1953 catalog.

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In the 1990s, I saw the Aladdin Magnolia whilst touring an open house, somewhere in the River Bend area, but I havent been able to find it since.

In the 1990s, I saw the Aladdin Magnolia whilst touring an open house, somewhere in the River Bend area, and 15 years later, I found it in this catalog (1953). Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find it since then.

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Somewhere in the River Bend/St. Louis area, someones telling somebody that this house came in on a train!

Somewhere in the River Bend/St. Louis area, someone's telling somebody that this house came in on a train - and this time, they're right!

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I asked Teddy for her help, but she got distracted by the many attractive models offered in the 1953 catalog.

I asked Teddy for her help, but she got distracted by the many attractive models offered in the 1953 catalog. She was utterly captivated by the Aladdin Madison. It *is* quite attractive!

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I must say that she does take this sort of thing quite seriously.

I must say that she does take this sort of thing quite seriously.

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If you’ve seen the Aladdin Magnolia in River Bend (or in other areas!) please leave a comment below.

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

You can read about my favorite Alton house here.

While in St. Louis, I did find several kit homes in Webster Groves.

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The Sears Wabash: Economical and Popular!

August 7th, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

According to the promotional literature, the Sears Wabash was “a house planned and designed by U. S. Government architects.”

I’m not sure when The Wabash first appeared, but I found it in my 1916 catalog (and not the 1914 catalog).

In 1916, it was a mere $551, and in 1920, it had gone up to $966 . If this really was “Uncle  Sam’s Idea” (as the literature suggests), it may have been created as an answer to the problem of the building material shortage during The Great War (also known as “The European War”).

It’s an interesting house, and this is the second one that’s been found in Ohio. According to the testimonials, there were several of these sold throughout the Midwest.

Thanks so much to Robb Hyde for finding and photographing this kit home.

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1916

In 1916, the Wabash was offered for $551.

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1920

"Planned and designed by US government architects..." (1920)

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house 1920

It has two wee tiny bedrooms, and yet a massive living room (1920).

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Apparently it was really popular in Illinois

Apparently it was really popular in the Midwest.

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house house

That kitchen looks a lot bigger than 9x11 (1920).

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1920 house

"The Wabash," complete with screened porch (1920).

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Heres the Wabash Robb Hyde found in Somewhere.

Here's the Wabash that Robb Hyde found in Alliance, Ohio. At some point, the "sunporch" was converted into enclosed living space. With two bedrooms measuring 8x9, I'm sure the home's occupants were fairly desperate for every bit of living space they could get! Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Apparently, that porch got turned into living space.

Note the original columns, siding and verge board. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Veiw

Nice shot of the home's front, which highlights the unusual window arrangement. Porch deck is new, but everything else appears to be original. Given that this house is nearly 100 years old, that's darn impressive. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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And Robb had the foresight to get some photos of the other side, too!

And Robb had the foresight to get some photos of the other side, too! Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Its a perfect match!

It's a perfect match!

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To read about the Sears Wabash that Donna Bakke found in Ohio, click here.

Thanks so much to Robb Hyde for finding and photographing this kit home.

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Webster Groves, Missouri: A Happy Memory

July 28th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

In Spring 2002, my new book on Sears Homes had just been published, and the Webster Grove Public Library (Missouri) was one of the first places that offered me a speaking gig.

A few days before the big event, someone called me and asked, “Have you been out to the Webster Groves Library today?”

I told them I had not, and asked why. The response was, “I’ll pick you up in a minute. Ride out there with me. You need to see this.”

When we pulled up in front of the building, there was a massive banner spanning the tall columns outside and it said, “The Houses That Sears Built - Rosemary Thornton - This Friday at 7:00 p.m.”

I’d never seen a sight like it. My name - on a great big banner - way up high where the whole world could see it.

That night, I sold 40 books, which was about 32 books more than I’d ever sold before. People stood in line to buy a book. People stood in line, waiting patiently for me to autograph their book. People said many nice things to me. It was one of those defining moments in my life, where I first had hope that maybe - just maybe - I could turn this passion for old kit homes into a real job.

Earlier this month, I returned to Webster Groves to poke around and see if I could find some kit homes I might have missed the first time (in 2002).

Not surprisingly, I found several, but my #1 favorite was this Aladdin Sonoma, just about one mile from the Webster Groves Library.

I’ve been hoping to find a real-life example of this sweet little house for a long, long time so it was quite a treat to find it in Webster Groves.

To read a more recent blog on Webster Groves, click here.

And “Webster Groves, Part III” can be found here.

Part IV is here.

And you can read Part V here.

Want to learn more about Aladdin kit homes? Click here.

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Because of its diminuitive size, this was known as an Aladdinette house.

Because of its diminutive size, this was known as an "Aladdinette" house (1919).

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An interesting feature of this house was that it had roll-away beds.

An interesting feature of this house was that it used a roll-away bed to save space.

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Oh, what a cute little house!

Oh, what a cute little house! This "Sonoma" is the mirror image of the house shown above, and the pergola and exterior door has been converted into an enclosed porch. It's hard to see from this angle, but the roofline for the original house is a perfect match to the catalog page.

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That extra-deep eave is missing from the chimney

That extra-deep eave is missing from the chimney but I'd surmise that it went missing after the first roof replacement job in the 1940s.

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Houw

That extra bit of depth on the eave by the chimney is distinctive, but would have been a hard item to countenance when it came to maintenance (1919). I've flipped the image (above) to match the house in Webster Groves. Notice the clipped gable.

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The view down the long side is also a good match.

The view down the long side is also a good match.

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And last but not least, this darling home still has its original windows.

And last but not least, this darling home still has its original 9/1 windows.

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What a fine house! And to think that I found it in Webster Groves!

What a fine house! And to think that I found it in Webster Groves!

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To learn more about identifying Sears Homes, click here.

Want to learn more about Aladdin kit homes? Click here.

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A “Country House” in the heart of Augusta, Georgia

July 24th, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

The word Villa literally means, “country house” and it’s also the name of Aladdin’s finest home.

Just like Sears, Aladdin sold kit homes through mail order catalogs. Aladdin was actually a bigger company than Sears, and lasted longer. Sears sold about 70,000 kit homes during their 32 years in the kit house business (1908-1940). Aladdin started earlier (1906) and stayed in the game for 75 years (1981), and sold more than 75,000 homes.

The houses arrived via boxcar, and probably had more than 12,000 pieces and parts! Each kit came with detailed blueprints (designed for novices) and a 75-page instruction book that told the homeowner how all those pieces and parts went together!

As a resident of Virginia, I can happily report that there are more Aladdins in this part of the country than Sears Homes. Proximity is probably part of this. The Midwest is loaded with Sears Homes. Aladdin had mills in  North Carolina, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Several months ago, someone told me about this Aladdin Villa in Augusta, Georgia. (Unfortunately, I don’t remember who originally provided the tidbit about this Aladdin Villa in Augusta, Georgia. Was it you, Rachel? ) Today I was poking around for a new blog topic and found this older file.

The photos shown below are from Steve Bracci Photography. Click on this link to learn more about this artist’s beautiful work.

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

To visit Dale’s website, click here.

Dr. Rebecca Hunter also has a wonderful website here.

And Rachel Shoemaker shares many rare photos of kit homes here.

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The Aladdin Villa was really their biggest and best home (1919).

The Villa was Aladdin's biggest and best home (1919).

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See what I mean about being big?

The home had a front staircase and a servants' staircase (accessible from the ktichen).

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And its also a genuinely beautiful home - even in black and white!

And it's also a genuinely beautiful home - even in black and white!

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Is there a more perfect house anywhere in Augusta?

Is there a more perfect house anywhere in Augusta? And that's not a rhetorical question. This house is breathtaking, and the color is perfect. This looks like a picture postcard. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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Oh man.

The landscaping, fence and house create the perfect medley of colors. Mature landscaping and tall shade trees are one of the elements that make older homes so desirable. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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Everything about this house is beautiful.

Everything about this house is so very beautiful. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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And once you go inside, it only gets better.

And once you go inside, it only gets better. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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And better and better.

Inside the home, the colors are equally striking. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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Inside

Classic Villa staircase, still elegant after all these years. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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And better.

That fireplace doesn't appear to be original, or it might have been an upgrade, but it's a nice fit for this fancy room. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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House

The living room is 16x26 and filled with light. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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Stunning

Can you imagine sunning on this stunning sunporch? If there are houses in heaven, this is the kind of place where I'd like to spend a lot of eternity. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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House

Typically, I'm not a big fan of red wallpaper with red accents, but this really works. The bright white trim and dark floors are the perfect complement. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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What a house.

What a house. Like something out of a dream book. Photo is copyright 2015 Steve Bracci Photography.

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And to think it came from a mail-order catalog!

And to think it came from a mail-order catalog!

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The photos shown above are from Steve Bracci Photography. Click on this link to learn more about this artist’s beautiful work.

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

To visit Dale’s website, click here.

Dr. Rebecca Hunter also has a wonderful website here.

And Rachel Shoemaker shares many rare photos of kit homes here.

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Oscar Heppe’s Ivanhoe

May 1st, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Almost five years ago, I wrote a blog on the Sears Ivanhoe in LaGrange, Illinois (discovered in a promotional flyer), and mentioned that it’d be fun to have a contemporary photo of the 1913-built house.

Some time later, William Frymark found the house in LaGrange and sent me three beautiful pictures of this grand old Sears kit house!

Too often, these 100-year-old Sears Homes end up getting torn down or falling down, so it was a special treat to see that this LaGrange house still alive and well, and in beautiful condition.

Thanks so much to William  Frymark for finding this house and sending along the photos.

To read more about identifying Sears Homes, click here.

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Roofing Flyer

The image above is from a brochure, promoting Sears building materials in general and roofing materials in particular. When I published that blog five years ago, I'd assumed Mr. Heeppes' home in LaGrange was brick. Turns out, it's all wood.

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the

"Slate surfaced shingles" look better than slate or tile? I'm not so sure about that, Mr. Heppes. Unfortunately, this brochure did not include images of the wallboard in the living room, dining room and one bedroom. He implies here that the wallboard was better than plaster. Hmmm...

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The Ivanhoe was a massive house.

The Ivanhoe was a massive house and one of the larger houses offered by Sears (1920).

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Thats a big house.

That's a big house for its time, with more than 1,900 square feet of living area.

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house

Complete with a bedroom for the maid!

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Mr. Heppes Ivanhoe in LaGrange.

Mr. Heppes' Ivanhoe in LaGrange, about 1913.

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Mr. Heppes Ivanhoe 102 years later.

Mr. Heppes' Ivanhoe 102 years later. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission. So there.

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A nice shot down the side of the 102-year-old home in LaGrange.

A nice shot down the side of the 102-year-old home in LaGrange. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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side

Mr. Heppes' beautiful old house apparently had an addition put on the rear. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another faithful reader found this Ivanhoe in Monmouth, Illinois.

Another faithful reader found this Ivanhoe in Monmouth, Illinois. It's also in wonderfully original condition. Photo is copyright 2011 Carol Parish and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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I discovered this beauty in Lewisburg, West Virginia.

I discovered this beauty in Lewisburg, West Virginia.

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Ivan

While visiting my daughter, I was surprised to find this Ivanhoe in a very ritzy neighborhood in Needham, Massachusetts (about 45 minutes from Boston).

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And yet, Im still pining for one more picture of one more Ivanhoe. This house was featured in a testimonial and is in West Point, Virginia (not too far from me in Norfolk).

And yet, I'm still pining for one more picture of one more Ivanhoe. This house was featured in a testimonial and is in West Point, Virginia (not too far from me in Norfolk). It faces the Pamunkey River and we're looking at the backside (on West Euclid Boulevard). I've knocked on the door and sent them letters but no response. My kingdom for a tour of this beauty!

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Thanks again to William Frymark for the wonderful photos of the Sears Ivanhoe in LaGrange!

To read more about the Sears Homes of West Point, click here.

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