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Posts Tagged ‘mail order kit house’

And Sometimes, They’re Hiding By The Post Office

September 4th, 2013 Sears Homes 2 comments

How many times have I driven the streets of Norfolk, searching for kit homes?

Well, let’s just say it’s a number higher than 20. Earlier this year, I discovered a Martha Washington when Milton and I were on our way to buy some honey biscuits from Church’s.

That was a shocker.

And then yesterday, I had occasion to seek out and find a new post office here in Norview (by the airport) and on my way to the post office, I saw a PERFECT Aladdin kit house, The Maples.

Today, I drove down the same road (this time, with my camera), trying to get in position to surreptitiously get a photo, when I drove past a Sears Willard.

One street, and two perfect kit homes.

Wow.

Just wow.

And now I’m wondering if I’m going to find a Magnolia somewhere in Norfolk!

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The Maples was a darling little bungalow offered by Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan).

The Maples was a darling little bungalow offered by Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan).

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One little house, two floor plans.

One little house, two floor plans.

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house

The second floorplan has no bathroom.

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What a cute house!

What a cute house!

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Oh yeah, baby!

Oh yeah, baby! What a perfect match!

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The other surprise  was the Sears Willard, just one block from the post office.

The other surprise was the Sears Willard, just one block from the post office. The image above is from the 1928 catalog. The living room has three windows on the right side (seen above).

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The Willard was a very popular house for Sears.

The Willard was a very popular house for Sears.

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And here it

A perfect Willard, less than two miles from my house. Wow.

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To learn more about kit homes, click here.

To contact Rose, leave a comment below.

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Buster Keaton and Sears Homes

April 29th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

Did you know that Buster Keaton did a short film about building a pre-cut kit house?

First released in 1920, the 20-minute film shows happy newlyweds (Buster and Sybil) receiving the gift of a “ready-to-assemble” kit home. Driven by jealousy, an old beau surreptitiously changes the numbers on the pre-cut framing members, thus wreaking havoc on Buster’s ability to build his 12,000-piece kit home.

As the saying goes, “True comedy is timeless.”

This is not only true comedy, but an awesome look back at a time when people built these kit homes. And it’s also interesting to think that - in 1920 - kit homes were such a big part of the American scene that moviegoers were expected to understand about “marked lumber.”

That “joke” would likely be lost on contemporary movie audiences because so little is known about this piece of America’s architectural history.

I first discovered “One Week” in Spring 2004, when my dear daughter highlighted this piece in a senior project. I was honored and touched that my daughter was drawn to an old movie about pre-cut kit homes - because of her mother’s career! :)

Click here to see Buster Keaton’s “One Week” on Youtube.

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Buster Keatons pre-cut kit house had a few minor problems.

Buster Keaton's pre-cut kit house had a few minor problems.

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It should have looked a little more like this.

It should have looked a little more like this. (Sears Whitehall under construction in Carlinville, IL - about 1919.)

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Sears kit homes did come with instruction books (as shown above).

Sears kit homes did come with instruction books (as shown above).

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The houses were ordered out of catalogs, such as this (1921).

The houses were ordered out of catalogs, such as this (1921).

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Framing members were marked (as shown) to help facilitate construction.

Framing members were marked (as shown) to help facilitate construction.

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To learn more about Sears Kit Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s latest book, click here.

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