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Posts Tagged ‘modern prefab kits’

All Things Vallonia

October 25th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

The Sears Vallonia was the classic Craftsman-style bungalow, with its lone gabled dormer sitting atop a side-gabled bungalow. It’s a cutie for sure and one of the most enduring designs that Sears offered. It was first offered in the mid-1910s and also appeared in the final Sears Modern Homes catalog in 1940.

Through the years, it changed a bit. Here’s a picture from the 1920 Modern Homes catalog. Note how the dormer is small and has only two diminutive windows.

There’s a wonderful Sears Vallonia in Springfield, Illinois - right next to the Amtrak train tracks! If anyone knows the address, please leave a comment below!

Click here to read All Things Vallonia, Part II.

Sears Vallonia from the 1916 catalog.

Sears Vallonia from the 1921 catalog.

In 1922, the Sears Vallonia changed its appearance a bit. The dormer now has three casement windows. The Vallonia maintained this look with few changes for the next 18 years.

Sears Vallonia as shown in the 1922 catalog

Sears Vallonia as shown in the 1920s

What year

The Vallonia also showed up in an early 1920s SEROCO paint catalog - and in color! Seroco was Sears own brand: SEars RObuck Company. Cute, huh?

Sears

Close-up of the Sears Vallonia

A perfect - and I mean PERFECT - Sears Vallonia in Columbia, Illinois.

A perfect - and I mean PERFECT - Sears Vallonia in Columbia, Illinois.

Sears Vallonia in Greenville, IL

Another perfect Sears Vallonia in Greenville, IL

Sears Vallonia in Aurora, Illinois

Sears Vallonia in Aurora, Illinois

And heres a perfect Vallonia in Grafton, Illinois.

And another fine-looking Vallonia in Grafton, Illinois.

Vintage photo (circa 1920s) of newly completed Sears Vallonia in Illinois

Vintage photo (circa 1920s) of newly completed Sears Vallonia in Illinois

Click here to read Part II of “All Things Vallonia.”

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Click here to read about the Sears Martha Washington.

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Sears Modern Homes - With Indoor Plumbing - Usually!

October 24th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

From 1908-1940, Sears sold houses by mail order. These 12,000-piece kits came with a 75-page instruction book that told the wanna-be homeowner how to put it all together. Sears promised that a “man of average abilities” could have it 100% complete in 90 days. Sears offered 370 designs, including foursquares, cape cods, neo-tudors, trailing edge Victorians, Colonials and more.

The specialty catalogs - devoted to “Modern Homes” - averaged about 100 pages with the peak being 1924, when the catalog hit 140 pages, with 100 designs. These “Sears Modern Homes” catalogs can now be found on eBay for a variety of prices.

And these really were modern homes. Think about this. Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote her “Little House” books describing life on the plains in the 1870s and 1880s. She talked about living in a soddie - a house made with dirt blocks - and waking up to find frost on her comforter.

At the turn of the 20th Century, American architecture evolved very quickly. We went from living in tiny cabins and soddies (sans lights, central heat and indoor plumbing) to these sweet little bungalows with three bedrooms, a full bathroom, and a kitchen - wired for electricity!

To read more about Sears Homes, click here.

Sears Osborne, catalog image from 1924

Sears Osborne, catalog image from 1924

In fact, sometimes these mail-order homes were more modern than the communities in which they were sold.

And that’s why the plumbing and electrical fixtures were NOT part of the kit home, but were purchased separately. If electrical service and municipal water systems were not available in your community, you wouldn’t need to spend money on the plumbing and electrical supplies!

In the back pages of the Sears Modern Homes catalogs, this little jewel was offered:

And it has two seats - for more family fun in the outhouse!!

And it has two seats - for more family fun in the outhouse!!

The Sears Modern Homes department closed their doors in 1940. During a corporate house-cleaning after WW2, all sales records, blueprints, ephemera and other items were destroyed. The only way to find these 75,000 kit homes today is literally, one by one.

To learn more, buy Rose’s book, The Houses That Sears Built.

To read more about Sears Homes, click here.