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The Concord: A Modern Residence at a Low Cost, Part II

May 23rd, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

Yesterday, I did a blog about the Sears Concord, and my tired eyes misread some of the fine print in an old Sears Modern Homes catalog.

House

In yesterday's blog, I showed this house, but misread the opposite page (which featured all the testimonials), and placed the wrong text with the photo. Nice house, and look at that porch!

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This is the correct text, which shows that the house was built in Monongahela, Pennsylvania.

This is the correct text, which shows that the house was built in Monongahela, Pennsylvania.

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So Sears Modern Hmoe #114 (The Concord) was built in Monongahela, PA.

So Sears Modern Home #114 (The Concord) was built in Monongahela, PA (1916 catalog).

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And then I remembered that the photo that Dale sent me, showed a Concord on Lincoln Street in Monongahela. I think its safe to say - its the same house as was featured in the testimonial section of the Sears Catalog in 1916.

And then I remembered that the photo that Dale sent me, showed a Concord on Lincoln Street in Monongahela. I think it's safe to say - it's the same house as was featured in the testimonial section of the Sears Catalog in 1916. (Photo is copyright 2010 Dale Patrick Wolicki and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Side by side comparison shows WHY its so difficult to identify these houses a century later. The whole front porch was removed, dramatically altering the look of the house!

Side by side comparison shows WHY it's so difficult to identify these houses a century later. The whole front porch was removed, dramatically altering the look of the house!

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And while we’re on the topic of identifying old Sears Homes, look at this house (below).

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Dale

The corresponding index identifies this as a Sears Model #114 (The Concord) and yet it doesn't really *look* like a Concord. The roof has been raised a significant amount, creating a larger second floor and also creating an entire third floor. Plus, there's no "cornice dormer" (as with the traditional Concord). In short, this house bears little resemblance to a #114.

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And yet

And yet, it's obviously described as a "C114" in the 1916 catalog. So it *is* a Sears Concord. Of special note is the fact that there's no mention of it being a customized design.

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And unfortunately, in these pre-1920 homes, youre not going to find any marked lumber, making identification ever more difficult.

And unfortunately, in these pre-1920 homes, you're not going to find any marked lumber, making identification ever more difficult. Shown here is the floor joists in a Sears Osborn in Sidney, Illinois. The "C" denoted a 2x6, while a "D" was a 2x8. You get the idea. :)

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To read part I of this blog, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

Click here to see WONDERFUL old photos of a Sears Concord that’s been faithfully and painstakingly restored.

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