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Posts Tagged ‘prefab kit house’

The World’s Most Beautiful Sears Arlington - in Gordonsville, Virginia

March 28th, 2013 Sears Homes No comments

Last week, I drove up to Charlottesville for an overnight trip, and I stopped in Mineral, Louisa and Gordonsville.

In Louisa, I found the World’s Most Perfect Kentucky (an Aladdin kit home), and if that had been the only kit home I’d found during the trip, that would have made it all worthwhile, but then I went into Gordonsville and found the World’s Most Beautiful Arlington.

And that made my day even better.

As I was leaving town, I saw an old signal tower on the railroad tracks, and that really was the cherry on the top of my already delightful day.

I’ve seen a lot of towns, but Gordonsville fast became one of my favorite places. It’s small enough to be charming, rich in local history (including railroad history!), and just big enough to be interesting. If it just had a railroad museum, it’d be perfect.

God bless the local citizenry for saving that old signal towel.

Scroll down to see photos of the World’s Most Perfect Arlington.

To read about the World’s Most Perfect Kentucky in nearby Louisa, click here.

And to learn more about what makes Louisa so special, click here.

And look what I found in Mineral (Virginia)!

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The Sears hosues

Most likely, the Sears Homes in Gordonsville came into town right here at the Gordonsville depot. Sadly, this building was torn down sometime in the 1970s or so. I'd be grateful to know an exact date. Just beyond the depot is the signal tower. I'd also be grateful to know how this survived the wrekcing ball. Photo is copyright 2010, C&O Historical Society and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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What a thrill to find the signal tower is still standing!

What a thrill to find the signal tower is still standing!

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The Sears Arlington was a classic Arts & Crafts bungalow (1919).

The Sears Arlington was a classic Arts & Crafts bungalow (1919).

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The Arlington, close up and personal.

The Arlington, close up and personal.

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Be still my heart! What a glorious, gorgeous example of a Sears Arlington!

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And if you look down the side, youll see it has the stair step windows.

And if you look down the side, you'll see it has the "stair step" windows. This Arlington truly is a perfect example, and a large part of the reason it's so perfect is that it retains its original siding and windows.

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Take a look at the original casements on the Arlington.

Take a look at the original casements on the Arlington.

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My oh my, what a beautiful thing to see!

My oh my, what a beautiful thing to see! It even has original WOODEN storms!!

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And just down the road from the Arlington is what I suspect is a Sears Chelsea.

And just down the road from the Arlington is what I suspect is a Sears Chelsea (1908).

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Is this a Chelsea in Gordonsville? Tough to know for sure. My first impression is YES, but Im just not 100% certain. Id love to get inside this house and do a more thorough inspection.

Is this a Chelsea in Gordonsville? Tough to know for sure. My first impression is YES, but I'm just not 100% certain. I'd love to get inside this house and do a more thorough inspection.

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A sneak peak of the beautiful Kentucky I found in Louisa.

A sneak peak of the beautiful Kentucky I found in Louisa.

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To read more about that beautiful Kentucky, click here.

To learn more about how you can support the good work of the C&O Historical Society, click here.

To contact Rose, please leave a comment below.

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“The Kentucky” in Louisa, Virginia

March 22nd, 2013 Sears Homes 7 comments

Aladdin was probably the biggest of the six national companies that sold kit homes through mail order. And here in Virginia, the majority of kit homes I’ve found are Aladdins. This is probably due to the fact that Aladdin had a huge mill in Wilmington, NC.

Earlier, I drove out to Charlottesville (from my home in Norfolk), and I took Route 33 so that I could look for kit homes. I’d about given up on finding anything in Louisa when I turned down a sleepy little road about four blocks from the train station and look what I found!  It’s an Aladdin Kentucky.

I’d been hoping to see one “in the flesh” for some time, and this one in Louisa is in WONDERFULLY original condition!

To read about another beautiful kit home I found in nearby Gordonsville, click here!

Click here to see what I found in Mineral (Virginia)!

To read about another “Kentucky” (in Mechanicsville, Iowa), click here.

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The Kentucky, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

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The Kentucky was offered in two floorpllans, small andl arge.

The Kentucky was offered in two floorplans, small and large. This house was 43' wide!!!

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Fine-looking house, isnt it?

Fine-looking house, isn't it?

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Be still my heart. Here it is, alive and well in Louisa, VA.

Be still my heart. Here it is, alive and well in Louisa, VA. It's rare to find a 100-year-old house still in original condition. This house has its original doors, windows and sidings!

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The Kentucky is a very wide house!

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Close-up on the details.

Close-up on the details. I love those windows!

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Many years ago, someone planted a pair of oaks squarely in front of the house.

Many years ago, someone planted a pair of oaks squarely in front of the house.

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Alad

Close-up on the catalog image shows detail of the columns, doors and window.

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It is

This Kentucky looks much like it did when built in 1914.

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Easily one of the best matches Ive ever seen - and its in Louisa, VA!

Easily one of the best matches I've ever seen - and it's in Louisa, VA!

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In addition to the Aladdin Kentucky, I also found this cute little bungalow in Louisa. This image is from the 1923 Aladdin catalog.

In addition to the Aladdin Kentucky, I also found this cute little bungalow in Louisa. This image is from the 1923 Aladdin catalog. This was the Aladdin "Cape Cod" (model name).

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What a nice match to the catalog page!

What a nice match to the catalog page!

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The Aladdin Madison was a very poplar house for Aladdin. In this graphic (1923 catalog), it was called The Lindbergh.

The Aladdin Madison was a very poplar house for Aladdin. In this graphic (1928 catalog), it was called "The Lindbergh."

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This house was offered with two floorplans.

This house was offered with two floorplans. The Madison in Louisa was the larger of the two floorplans, with the extra window on the home's front, and the two bump-outs in the rear.

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Heres the Madison in Louisa! Another lovely match!

Here's the Madison in Louisa! Another lovely match!

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To learn more about why these kit homes are historically significant, click here.

To read about the kit homes in Staunton,VA, click here.

And to learn more about why Louisa is so historically significant, click here.

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The Jefferson: A True Example of Southern Colonial Architecture

June 12th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

For 12 years, I’ve been looking hard for the Sears Jefferson. This style of house is fairly popular and look-alikes aren’t too hard to find.

However, the genuine article, the Sears Jefferson is very difficult to find.

In fact, the only one I know of is in Carbondale, Illinois, and I didn’t find it. Rebecca Hunter did.

When I visited the Jefferson in person, my biggest surprise was the lead-glass window over the front door. You don’t find those too often in kit houses. This was a fancy house and it came with all the accoutrements.

To learn more about identifying Sears Homes, click here.

To read about the Aladdin Villa, click here.

The Sears Jefferson (1936 catalog).

The Sears Jefferson (1936 catalog).

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Fancy writing for a fancy house!

Fancy writing for a fancy house!

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Spacious, too.

Spacious, too. The Jefferson had more than 2,400 square feet.

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A close-up of the house (1936 catalog).

A close-up of the house (1936 catalog).

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And here it is in Carbondale.

Carbondale's "Jefferson" is a perfect match, down to the details. Notice the railings.

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Another angle

The Jefferson is perfectly symmetrical with nine windows on the front. Most of the "look-alike" houses I've seen have paired windows. And many have a small parade porch centered on the second floor (over the front entry). Lastly, pay attention to the entry.

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Close-up on that fancy entry to the Jefferson.

Close-up on that fancy entry to the Jefferson.

To read the next fascinating blog on Sears Homes, click here.

To hear an amazing story about my amazing Aunt Addie, click here.

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The Kit Homes of Chapel Hill, NC

May 24th, 2012 Sears Homes 1 comment

Chapel Hill is a city full of hazards for a house hunter such as myself.

First, there are the trees. Lots and lots of mature trees, which makes it difficult to see the houses.

Secondly, there are bushes. Ligustrums, Photinias, Hollies, Nandina and Wax Myrtles are everywhere. And they’re really big, too!

Third, it’s a college town, full of students who think nothing of stepping off the curb in front of a slow-moving Camry. That was just scary.

And last, the streets are very narrow and labyrinthine, winding to and fro.

And that’s how I missed the Ardara (or so I tell myself). There’s a famous Sears House in Chapel Hill, built in the 1920s and still occupied by its original resident! I’d love to get a high-resolution photo of this house, because I never saw it!  :(

Perhaps next time I’m in the area, someone will drive me around. That makes house-hunting much easier!

However, I did see that the town has a “Rosemary Street,” and better yet, of the three kit homes I found, two of them are on Rosemary Street!

Now that’s a fine town!

Brentwood

In North Carolina, I've found far more Aladdin kit homes than Sears. Aladdin (like Sears), sold kit homes through a mail-order catalog. Aladdin had a mill in Wilmington, NC so it's not surprising that there are so many Aladdins in this part of the country.

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The Brentwood (shown above) was one of Aladdin's biggest houses. It's a classic "Arts & Crafts" design, and was offered in the 1910s and 1920s.

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chapel hill

Located on Rosemary Street, this Brentwood is in incredibly beautiful shape. The owners obviously love their home. After discovering this house, I did something that I *never* do anymore. I parked the car and walked up the driveway and knocked on their door. I'm highly allergic to people, and yet, this sweet thing was worth it. No one answered, so I'm hoping if they read this blog, they'll leave a comment. I'd love to see the inside some time. This house is in amazingly original condition and has been beautifully maintained. The owners get my award for "Most Beautiful Aladdin Brentwood in the United States."

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Aladdin

A comparison of the Aladdin Brentwood (catalog image and Chapel Hill house).

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The Harris Brothers

Harris Brothers was yet another kit home company, based in Chicago.

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Due to that darn landscaping, I could not get a good photo

Due to that darn landscaping, I could not get a good photo but if you look closely at the fireplace chimney, windows and porch overhang, you can see that this is a Harris Brothers N-1000. And it has the rounded porch (as shown in the catalog page).

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The Aladdin Inverness

The Aladdin Inverness had a very interesting roofline!

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And that roofline makes it easy to identify!

And that distinctive roofline makes it easy to identify! Notice the three brick pillars that just kind of sit there, with no purpose in life (other than serving as a plant stand).

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And here it is!

Also located on Rosemary Street (yay!), this little house is a perfect example of the Aladdin Inverness. Even has the three brick pillars out front! This house is near downtown. I wonder if the folks in Chapel Hill know that it's a kit house?

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ahoseComparison of the two houses. Pretty sweet, huh?

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And the one that got away...

And the one that got away. Somewhere in Chapel Hill is a Sears Ardara. I'd love to get a photo of this house. I can't believe I missed it!

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To learn more about the kit homes in North Carolina, click here.

To read about the large collection of Aladdin kit homes in Roanoke Rapids, click here.

Or if you’re tired of reading about houses and want to read about my shiny new horseless carriage, click here.

Did you enjoy the blog? Please leave a comment!

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A Pulchritudinous Priscilla in Pretty Pennsylvania

May 6th, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

My buddy Dale found and photographed this Sears Priscilla in Glenview, Pennsylvania three years ago and shared it with me. Good thing he did, because I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Priscilla “in the flesh.”

This classic Dutch Colonial had about 1,600 square feet and a spacious attic, too (due to the steep pitch of the roof). As is shown by the floor plan (below), it had a very large living room (25′ by 14′), a fireplace with a tiled hearth, built-in china hutch in the dining room, and a built-in ironing board in the kitchen.

Upstairs, there were three bedrooms and a sleeping porch (which was probably converted into a bedroom in later years). To learn more about why “sleeping porches” were so popular, click here.

Very few Sears kit homes had functional shutters, but the Priscilla was one of them.

It was a beautiful home and it was one of the more expensive houses that Sears offered, which may explain why it wasn’t a more popular house.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To read about how to identify kit homes, click here.

Raise your hand if you had to look up “pulchritudinous.”  ;)

The Priscilla (1928 catalog)

The Priscilla (1928 catalog)

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First floor

The living room spans the full width of the first floor.

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Second floor

The second floor has four good size rooms.

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Close-up of the Sears Priscilla (1928).

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The Priscilla in Glenview, PA.  Photo is copyright 2009 Dale Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

The pulchritudinous Priscilla in Glenview, PA. Notice the details around the front porch, the fan lite and side lites. Lots of distinctive features here. (Photo is copyright 2009 Dale Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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To see more pretty pictures, click here.

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That Had to Hurt

January 6th, 2012 Sears Homes 6 comments

Yikes.

You know that had to hurt.

Talk about a splitting headache.

Talk about a splitting headache. This poor Sears kit house (The Woodland) is on East 233 and Wickham in the Bronx (New York). It must have been in pretty dismal condition prior to whatever *really* bad thing recently happened to it. This catastrophic damage appeared soon after a bad wind storm came through the area. It might have been a tree that befell this fine old house. (Photo is copyright 2012 Nicole Zernone and can not be reproduced or used without written permission.)

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Whatever it was, it surely put a hurtin' on this Sears Woodland. (Photo is copyright 2012 Nicole Zernone and can not be reproduced or used without written permission.)

Go to the light, little house. Go to the light.

Go to the light, little house. Go to the light. (Photo is copyright 2012 Nicole Zernone and can not be reproduced or used without written permission.)

Sears Woodland as seen in the 1921 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

Sears Woodland as seen in the 1921 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

And a reasonably happy and healthy Sears Woodland in Clifton Forge, Virginia.

And a reasonably happy and healthy Sears Woodland in Clifton Forge, Virginia.

Not sure why, but Clifton Forge has an amazing collection of Sears Homes. Click here to see more.

Another happy Sears Woodland in Bluefield, WV.

Another happy Sears Woodland in Bluefield, WV.

And one in Bloomington, IL.

And one in Bloomington, IL.

And in the tiny town of Siegel, IL.

And in the tiny town of Siegel, IL. This has a bay window, but that was an option.

One of the distinctive features of the Sears Woodland (and 24 other popular Sears models) was this unique column detail.

One of the distinctive features of the Sears Woodland (and 24 other popular Sears models) is this unique column detail. Another eye-catching feature of the Woodland are the two windows flanking the front door.

Owe.

This is an old photo from 2002. This is a really "insensitive" siding job. Why oh why do people put siding over COLUMNS? If you are physically unable to turn off "Dancing with the Stars" long enough to paint your porch columns, perhaps you should reconsider this whole "homeownership" thing. I love this old photo because of the sign in the front yard. It says, "Gazebo Award: Home of the Month." I think that "gazebo" must be Latin for "creative overuse of poly-vinyl chloride in residential applications." I could be wrong about that, though .

Was this really necessary?

Was this really necessary?

Another Woodland thats feeling some pain. This one is in Tulsa.

Another Woodland that's feeling some pain, however it's being remodeled. This one is in Tulsa. (Photo is copyright 2010 Rachel Shoemaker and can not be reproduced or used without written permission.)

The Sears Woodland was a very popular house. It was offered in the late 1910s, and endured into the 1930s. Its shown here in the 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Sears Woodland was a very popular house. It was offered in the late 1910s, and endured into the 1930s. It's shown here in the 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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To read about the Sears Magnolia (Sears fanciest house!) that’s in Syracuse, NY, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To turn on to another obsession that’s even more addicting than Sears Homes, click here.

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The Aladdin Shadowlawn: A Mass of Lights and Shadows

January 3rd, 2012 Sears Homes 4 comments

Did you ever see a more beautiful picture of its kind than the one shown here? A mass of lights and shadows, softening the greens, browns and grays of the foliage; shingles and cobbles delight the eye. You can almost feel the touch of the sunbeams patterning the lawn, and you just want to stroll up the steps and into the inviting shade of the porch.  (From the 1919 Aladdin Homes catalog)

So reads the promotional text for the Aladdin Shadowlawn. And it is a beauty. That Shadowlawn was probably one of Aladdin’s top five most popular designs.

Aladdin, like Sears, sold kit homes through a mail-order catalog. Aladdin started business in 1906, and Sears started two years later in 1908. Sears closed their Modern Homes Department in 1940, but Aladdin continued on until 1981!  To learn more about Aladdin’s history, click here. Thanks to Dale Wolicki for info on Aladdin!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

The Aladdin Shadowlawn as seen in the 1919 Aladdin catalog.

The Aladdin Shadowlawn as seen in the 1919 Aladdin catalog.

Probably my favorite Shadowlawn, and its right here in Hampton, Virginia. I wonder if these people even know they have an Aladdin Shadowlawn. If theyre like most people Ive encountered, theyre convinced its a Sears Kit Home because theyve never even heard of Aladdin.

Probably my favorite Shadowlawn, and it's right here in Hampton, Virginia. I wonder if these people even know they have an Aladdin Shadowlawn? If they're like most people I've encountered, they're convinced it's a Sears Kit Home because they've never even heard of Aladdin.

Another favorite Shadowlawn, and this one is in Tarboro, NC. Aladdin had a big mill in Wilmington, NC.

Another favorite Shadowlawn, and this one is in Tarboro, NC. Aladdin had a big mill in Wilmington, NC, so it's not surprising that there are many Aladdins in North Carolina.

This Aladdin has had some additions, but it still looks good. Its in Rocky Mount, NC which also has an abundance of Aladdin kit homes (and a couple Lustrons, too).

This Aladdin has had some additions, but it still looks good. It's in Rocky Mount, NC which also has an abundance of Aladdin kit homes (and a couple Lustrons, too).

This Shadowlawn is close to home, and its in Portsmouth, VA (my home town). Its in a section of town known as Port Norfolk (yes, its in Portsmouth), not to be confused with West Norfolk (also in Portsmouth) or South Norfolk (which is in Chesapeake). I live in Norfolk. Period.

This Shadowlawn is close to home, and it's in Portsmouth, VA (my home town). It's in a section of town known as Port Norfolk (yes, it's in Portsmouth), not to be confused with West Norfolk (also in Portsmouth) or South Norfolk (which is in Chesapeake). I live in Norfolk. Period.

Another beautiful Shadowlawn and this one is in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Photo is courtesy of Rachel Shoemaker, and may not be used or reprinted without permission.

Another beautiful Shadowlawn and this one is in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Photo is courtesy of Rachel Shoemaker, and may not be used or reprinted without permission.

Another Shadowlawn close to home, this one is on Elm Avenue in Portsmouth.

Another Shadowlawn close to home, this one is on Elm Avenue in Portsmouth.

The fake Shadowlawn shown in the planbook has a much higher pitch to the roof. Look at the position of the eave brackets here.

The "fake Shadowlawn" shown in the planbook has a much higher pitch to the roof. Look at the position of the eave brackets here.

Is this a Shadowlawn in Maryland?

Is this a real Shadowlawn in Maryland or another fake?? Porches come and go, and sometimes, they're never built in the first place. The windows sure look right, but look at that roofline. It's much higher and steeper than a true Shadowlawn. I'd have to say it could be the planbook house (shown above). To be sure, I'd have to go inside the house and measure the rooms.

This house in Lombard, Illinois is definitely NOT a Shadowlawn. The roof is way too steeply pitched, the eaves are too small, and the brackets are in the wrong place.

This house in Lombard, Illinois is definitely NOT a Shadowlawn. The roof is way too steeply pitched, the eaves are too small, and the brackets are too small and not placed where they should be. This is a "faux" Shadowlawn. There was also a plan book design that looked a lot like the Shadowlawn. It's possible that this house came from a planbook.

Is this an Aladdin or Plan Book house? Id lean toward Aladdin, mainly because Ive found so many Aladdins in this part of Norfolk (Lafayette/Winona).

Is this an Aladdin or Plan Book house? I'd lean toward Aladdin, mainly because I've found so many verified Aladdins in this part of Norfolk (Lafayette/Winona section).

Located on Alby Street in Alton, IL, this probably is a Shadowlawn, despite the slightly different window arrangement. The brackets are right, the roofline is right and the house just looks like an Aladdin Shadowlawn. The living room stretches across the entire front of the house, so changing the windows around a bit wouldnt be too problematic.

Located on Alby Street in Alton, IL, this probably is a Shadowlawn, despite the slightly different window arrangement. The brackets are right, the roofline is right and the house just "looks" like an Aladdin Shadowlawn. The living room stretches across the entire front of the house, so changing the windows around a bit wouldn't be too problematic.

Another favorite Shadowlawn, this one is in Concord, NC.

Another favorite Shadowlawn, this one is in Concord, NC.

Another favorite, this is in Baton Rouge, LA. For years and years and years, everyone thought this was a Sears House, but no one knew the model name. When they drove me out to this house and said it was a special Sears House, I couldnt help but giggle. Way too often, Aladdin kit homes are called Sears Homes, just because Sears was a more well-known name.

Another favorite, this is in Baton Rouge, LA. For years and years and years, everyone thought this was a Sears House, but no one knew the model name. When they drove me out to this house and said it was a "special" Sears House, I couldn't help but giggle. Way too often, Aladdin kit homes are called "Sears Homes," just because Sears was a more well-known name.

And this Shadowlawn in Baton Rouge had a matching Aladdin Garage.

And this Shadowlawn in Baton Rouge had a matching Aladdin Garage.

The Peerless Garage, offered by Aladdin as a match to the Shadowlawn.

The Peerless Garage, offered by Aladdin as a "match" to the Shadowlawn.

The Aladdin Shadowlawn was very spacious.

The Aladdin Shadowlawn was very spacious.

A precursor to the Aladdin Shadowlawn was the Massachusetts.

A precursor to the Aladdin Shadowlawn was the "Massachusetts." (1914)

To learn more about Aladdin, click here.

To learn more about identifying kit homes, click here.

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The Humble Waltons Among Us (Sears Waltons, That Is)

November 19th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

The Sears Walton was probably one of Sears top-10 best selling models.

It was also one of Sears’ most practical houses, with 1200 square feet, a spacious front porch, compact kitchen, and less than 40 square feet wasted on the one small hallway.

One of the defining characteristics of the Sears Walton is that small box window on the front bedroom, the oversized front porch (which extends beyond the main wall of the house), and the contrasting rooflines on the porch and main house. Plus, the dining room has a gabled bay with three windows.

In short, it’s an easy house to spot, due to its many interesting architectural elements.

The Sears Walton was also a popular house, but John Boy never slept here.

The Sears Walton was also a popular house, but John Boy never slept here.

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And it even has the little box window on the front of the house!

The floor plan for the Sears Walton shows the spacious living room and dining room, and wee tiny bedrooms! (10 x 9, 10 x 10, and 10 x 11).

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Sears Walton in the Craddock section of Portsmouth, VA

Sears Walton in the Craddock section of Portsmouth, VA

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Sears Walton in Muncie

This is my favorite Sears Walton. No kidding. Talk about "original condition"! This thing is a beauty! This photo was snapped in early 2004, and I'd bet money that this sad little house (in a commercial district) is probably long gone. This house is also a testimony to the quality of building materials used in Sears Homes. This house hasn't seen a coat of paint in 40 years (or more), and every smidge of paint is long gone from its cypress exterior, and yet - it still stands. Try neglecting a modern McMansion for 40 years and see what you have left! This house is (was) in Muncie, Indiana.

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Sears Walton in West Lafayette, Indiana

Sears Walton in West Lafayette, Indiana. Notice the oversized front porch.

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And a beautiful Walton in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

And a beautiful Walton in Glen Ellyn, Illinois

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The Sears Walton

The Sears Walton in Champaign has had some changes (vinyl siding, replacement windows and a closed-in porch), but it's still a Walton.

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Most of the Sears Waltons Ive seen are yellow! Just like this one in Danville.

On this Walton in Danville, Virginia, someone extended that dining room bay and turned it into a porte cochere! Despite the landscaping, you can see a piece of that box windows on the left front.

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Sears Walton, but if only I knew where! Its somewhere near downtown Raleigh.

Sears Walton in downtown Raleigh.

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Walton in Paducah, Kentucky.

I suspect this is also a Sears Walton, but has been dramatically altered. The small gable over the box window could easily have been added when all this plastic and vinyl was being installed. This Walton is in Paducah, KY.

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Is this a Sears Walton? Id say it probably is, even though its missing the little box window on the front. Thatd be an easy change for a carpenter to make on the site.

Is this a Sears Walton? I'd say it probably is, even though it's missing the little box window on the front. That'd be an easy change for a carpenter to make on the site.

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Sears Walton at 102 Oakwood Avenue

Sears Walton in a small town just outside of Richmond, Virginia.

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This Walton is one of two, side by side, in Cape Charles, Virginia

This "Walton" is one of two, side by side, in Cape Charles, Virginia

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Sears Walton

Sears Walton as seen in the 1921 Modern Homes catalog.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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Beautify Your Premises with a Sears Kit Pergola!

June 26th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

For a mere $83.70, you can beautify your premises with this graceful, imposing pergola. The text (see below) promises that everything is pre-cut and “ready to put together!”

This image came from the 1921 Sears Building Materials catalog, and I just fell in love with it. I’ve seen a few pergolas like this - randomly placed in a back yard - and they’re all stunning.

And it’s an easy-to-build kit!

Awesome. Just awesome.

My own pergola (built by my nice-guy husband) is shown below.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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Pergola as shown in the 1921 Building Materials catalog.

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It is indeed a thing of beauty! (1921 Sears Building Materials catalog)

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And it only weighs 1,200 pounds!

And I saved the best for last: The Perfect Pergola

The pergola built by Wayne Ringer is a thing of beauty!

To read another article, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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Holy Moly, Another Magnolia?

May 3rd, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

A dear soul on Facebook sent me a note this morning asking if I’d taken a look at the house at 1500 James Street in Syracuse, New York. Unable to sleep at 2:00 in the morning, I went looking via Google maps, expecting to be disappointed yet again. At least twice a week, I get a note from someone who is utterly convinced that they’ve seen a Sears Magnolia and every time, they’re wrong.

However this time, they might be right.

Now, I have to use every bit of self-control I have, not to get in a car and drive nine hours to Syracuse and see this house. The picture available via Google maps is unusually poor, and I’m not able to see much detail, and am unwilling to make a pronouncement at this point, but that house at 1500 James sure does look like a Sears Magnolia!

If anyone within the sound of my voice would be interested in getting about 4000 pictures of this house and sending it to me, I would be so very grateful. In fact, I’d send you a copy of any and all of my books you’d like to add to your library. :)  Signed, too. Free books. Just snap a few photos, send them to me and make an authors day!  :)

Updated to add: Having figured out how to use “bird’s eye view” on Bing, I’m becoming ever more confident that this house in Syracuse is indeed a Magnolia.

My kingdom for a high resolution digital picture!!!!

Sears Magnolia

Sears Magnolia as seen in the 1921 Sears Modern Homes catalog. The Sears Magnolia was offered from 1918-1922.

Details on Sears Magnolias front porch

Details on the Sears Magnolia's front porch. The two-story columns are an eye-catching feature. Also notice the distinctive roof lines and unique details around the front porch. At its core, the Sears Magnolia is a classic foursquare with delusions of grandeur.

Maggy in Benson

The Maggy in Benson, NC is a spot-on match.

Sears Magnolia in Canton, Ohio

A beautiful Sears Magnolia in Canton, Ohio

Sears Magnolia

Sears Magnolia in Benson, NC.

Sears Magnolia in Irwin, PA.  (Photo courtesy of Bob Keeling)

Sears Magnolia in Irwin, PA. (Photo courtesy of Bob Keeling) Done in brick, this Sears Magnolia also is not a spot-on match to the catalog page.

Magnolia in South Carolina

The Magnolia in Alabama is also not a spot-on match to the original catalog image. Most obvious is that attic dormer, which is much simpler than the Magnolia dormer. Yet this house in Piedmont Alabama is a Sears Magnolia.

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