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Posts Tagged ‘rosemary and sears homes’

Penniman Par-TAY! It’s DONE!

May 24th, 2018 Sears Homes 6 comments

Updated! Good lecture. Good times.  :D

Ghost Towns.

Virginia History.

Phenomenal Personal Sacrifice.

Women workers.

And a devastating epidemic that wiped out so many workers that the local cemeteries ran out of space.

Penniman has all of these elements and more, and it’s a great story that needs to be told.

On Saturday, May 26, 2018, I’m giving a talk on Penniman at the James City County Library, at 2:00 pm.

YOU MISSED IT! ;)

If you’re able, please attend and learn more about this forgotten chapter of Virginia’s history!

To learn more about Penniman, click here.

Bricks from the Penniman smokestack were salvaged to build a school for African-American children.

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My information on Penniman is always expanding and changing! Last week, I obtained this Penniman fob on Ebay.

The information on Penniman is always expanding and changing! Last week, I obtained this Penniman fob on Ebay. This fob would have been worn by the workers at the DuPont plant, six miles outside of Williamsburg. Who is this young man? How I wish that I knew.

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The rear of the fob shows more detail.

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Come learn about Penniman!

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To learn more about Penniman, click here.

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Is That You, Dr. Cottrell?

February 11th, 2018 Sears Homes 4 comments

Last month, Steven Beauter was kind enough to share an incredible vintage photo album with me, which featured more than a dozen pictures from 1918-era Penniman, Virginia, a “ghost city” six miles from Williamsburg.

There are several unidentified folks within the pages of Steven’s photo album, but I’m asking your help in figuring out one image in particular.

Two years ago, the family of Dr. John Henderson (a physician at Penniman Hospital) sent me a photograph of the staff of Penniman Hospital. It was a wonderful discovery. Dr. Henderson’s family also shared the December 1918 edition of “The Penniman Projectile” which provided an insight into day-to-day life at The Camp (as it was known).

With this new knowledge, maybe we can stitch together more of the fabric of this story.

Please take a moment and look at the image below and give an opinion!

Thanks so much.

To learn more about Penniman, click here.

A note about watermarks: It saddens me to alter these images by adding a watermark, but unfortunately, it’s a necessity of these times in which we live.

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Within the pages of the Penniman Projectile, I found this picture, identifying Dr. Sam Cottrell as Pennimans Chief Physician.

Within the pages of the Penniman Projectile, I found this picture, identifying Dr. Sam Cottrell as Penniman's Chief Physician.

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This image above came from the family of Dr. Henderson, and I can now identify the second fellow from the left as Dr. Samuel Cottrell (Penniman's chief physician). And I'm still hoping to figure out that woman on the far right. She was a female physician, employed by DuPont to provide care to the overwhelmingly female work force.

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This image is from Steven Beauter’s photo album. My friend, Anne Robinson Hallerman, has posited that the man shown above is also Dr. Samuel Cottrell. I’m terrible with these type of judgments, but my first guess is, Anne is right about this.

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Here's a picture of all three images together. Is that fellow on the far right also Dr. Cottrell?

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Cottrell

Countless thanks to the family of Dr. John Henderson for sharing this 80-page magazine with me. It's the source of so much information about life at The Camp.

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To learn more about Penniman, click here.

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They’re Gone, Chief…

May 6th, 2017 Sears Homes 4 comments

Yesterday, I shipped out six copies (autographed) of “The Houses That Sears Built,” leaving one lone soldier in the box. Last night, an order came from Keyport, New Jersey for the last remaining book.

How I wish that I could retrieve those 6+ boxes of books from Harrison Moving Storage in Portsmouth. Unfortunately, their retrieval fees are just too much to justify the expense. As I said yesterday, I never expected to be living in this rental for almost eight months. I thought I’d be gone from  here in weeks.

But here I sit.

For now, I’ve ordered a limited reprint (only 200 copies) from Corley Printing in St. Louis.

If you order a copy of “The Houses That Sears Built,” there will be about a two-week delay. And once those 200 are gone, that might be it for a time.

To pre-order your copy, click here.

To learn more about how my books landed in storage, click here.

Read more about Sears Homes here.

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Horsie I, II, III, IV and V play in the empty box of the last books in my possession.

Horsie I, II, III, IV and V play in the empty box of the last books in my possession.

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Several people are worried that Teddy has been shoved off center stage with the addition of the Horsie Group™ but she's still the Top Dog in more ways than one. When it comes to posing, Teddy just doesn't fit into small boxes as well as the Horsie Group™.

Several people are worried that Teddy has been shoved off center stage with the addition of the Horsie Group™ but she's still the Top Dog. However, when it comes to posing cute animals in a little box, Teddy is more challenging.

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To learn more about how my books landed in storage, click here.

Read more about Sears Homes here.

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Homer and His Daughters

July 16th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

In the 1880 Federal Census, my great, great grandfather (Homer Hoyt) is listed as “Homah Hoyt.” Homer was from Vermont (and living in Lake Mills, WI at the time) and I can just hear the long-time New Englander telling the census taker, “Ah said, mah name is Homah.”

Guess they haven’t had “R’s” in New England in a long, long time.

Homer Hoyt at age 17 (late 1850s or early 1860s)

Homer Hoyt at age 17 (about 1858). Homer was front Vermont, but by 1870, Homer and his wife (Julia) were living in the Lake Mills (Wisconsin) area.

Addie (left) and Anna Hoyt in 1887. Addie would have been 15 years old, and Anna would have been 21.

Addie (left) and Anna Hoyt in 1887. Addie would have been 15 years old, and Anna would have been 21.

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Homer's two daughters were Anna Hoyt Whitmore (left) and Addie Hoyt Fargo (right). Anna was 44 in this photo. Addie (right) was 24. The photo on the left was taken in 1910, and the photo on the right was 1896. Addie remained in Lake Mills until her death in 1891, and Anna Hoyt married Wilbur Whitmore and moved to Denver.

To read about his children, Anna and Addie, click here.

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

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