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Posts Tagged ‘sears and roebuck in chicago’

Finding the CUSTOMIZED Houses that Sears Built, Part IV

February 13th, 2016 Sears Homes 3 comments

Recently, I posted several images of a customized Sears House in Glen Ellyn that we found earlier this month. Subsequently, Rachel managed to find a slew of high quality photos online, at Keller Williams Realty Company (Glen Ellyn), so it’s with a hopeful heart that they’re willing to have those photos shared here, in the interest of history. And maybe also in the interest of good publicity!

As mentioned in a prior blog, we found this house thanks to a rare document that was recently discovered, authenticating several massive and grand “kit homes” with designs and building materials from Sears. These houses were featured in Sears & Roebuck literature, promoting the company’s architectural services.

As with the other customized Sears Home we found, this house in Glen Ellyn was also owned by a high-ranking Sears employee, who started at Sears in the 1910s and remained with the company for many years.

Assessor records indicate that this house was built in 1930, and has five bedrooms and four baths.

Again, a warm thanks to Keller Williams Realty Company in Glen Ellyn for permitting me (and/or forgiving me) the use of these photos.

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

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Oh my, what a glorious home in Glen Ellyn! This house came from Sears & Roebuck and both the design and building materials came from Sears.

What a beauty in Glen Ellyn! Both the design and the building materials were ordered from Sears.

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It would appear that there have been additions put on the homes rear.

It would appear that there have been additions put on the home's rear.

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The entry foyer is stunning!

The entry foyer is stunning!

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It seems likely that this is the homes original (1930s) bathroom.

It seems likely that this is the home's original (1930s) bathroom.

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I think theyve done a little updating on the kitchen.

I think they've done a little updating on the kitchen.

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Since it originally looked something like this...

Since it originally looked something like this...

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And probably had these accoutrements as well.

And probably had these accouterments as well.

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The living room is quite grand.

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The homes entry way

The home's entry way does have a decided "Sears Flavor"!

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It looks a lot like the entry on the Sears Jefferson in Carbondale, Illinois.

It looks a lot like the entry on the Sears "Jefferson" in Carbondale, Illinois.

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And to think it came from a mail-order catalog.

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Again, a warm thanks to Keller Williams Realty Company in Glen Ellyn for permitting me (and/or forgiving me) the use of these photos.

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

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Is Your Neighbor’s House a Sears Kit House?

July 8th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Next time your neighbor invites you over for high tea, take that opportunity to go into their basement and inspect his/her framing members for marks.  More than 90% of the people living in these homes don’t realize what they have. Incredibly, most of these Sears Homeowners tell me - after learning about the unique history of their house - that they’d “never noticed all those numbers” on their floor joists! Or, they saw them and had no idea what they meant.

Below are pictures of marked lumber in Sears Homes!

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This mark - so bold and pretty - was invisible to the eye of the homeowner. She'd lived in this house for 20 years and was totally surprised to see this mark on *all* of her floor joists. This is a typical mark found in a Sears Home. It's a letter and a three-digit number. A is for 2x4, B is 2x6, C is 2x8 and D is 2x10. The numbers - together with detailed blueprints and a 75-page instruction book - told the novice home builder how all those pieces and parts went together.

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Another 2x10 in another Midwestern basement. The number is typically found 2-6" inches from the end of the joist, and can also be found on the butt end of the lumber.

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Sometimes, the marks are easy to spot - if you know where to look.

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Sometimes, they're not so easy to see. This is a 2x4 on the underside of a staircase in a Sears Sunbeam in Beckley, WV. The mark is very faint. Look at the wide part of the 2x4 and you'll see "A 105" directly below the large nail.

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See it now?

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Close-up of the mark (also enhanced).

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At this Sears Vallonia in Columbia, Illinois, the builder was so proud of his Sears House, he turned the treads and risers wrong-side out, so everyone could see those marks.

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The floor joist on this Sears Magnolia in Benson, NC says "2089" and has a family name written beside it. When the lumber was bundled up and prepared for shipment in Cairo, IL, the model number and buyer's name was scribbled in blue grease pencil. Finding a model number in blue grease pencil on a joist is also an effective means of authenticating a Sears Home.

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Those 12,000 pieces of house were shipped via boxcar, and the shipping crates were wooden, and were marked with the homeowner's name. Oftimes, the old crates were re-used to build coal bins or basement walls. This plank was salvaged from an old shipping crate and nailed to a basement wall in an Osborn in Sidney, IL.

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This is a mark found on a newer (post-1934) Sears Home.

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Shipping labels can also provide proof that you have a Sears kit home. Often, the words "Sears and Roebuck" do not appear anywhere on the label, but contain only Sears address: 925 Homan Avenue, Chicago, IL. Shipping labels are often found on the back of millwork.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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