Archive

Posts Tagged ‘sears and roebuck’

The Hawthorne Effect

April 6th, 2017 Sears Homes 2 comments

It wasn’t terribly long ago that I noticed that the Avondale and the Hawthorne were the same house, with a lone difference: The attic/second floor on the Hawthorne was enlarged, to create livable space. From what I’ve seen out in the world, the Avondale was a very popular model for Sears, and the Hawthorne was quite rare.

Both the Avondale and the Hawthorne were elegant bungalows with a few extra features, such as stained glass options on the smaller windows near the fireplace, an inglenook in the living room, a large polygon bay at both the dining room and front bedroom and a spacious front porch.

And what is the Hawthorne Effect? It actually has nothing to do with Sears Homes. It’s a theory that subjects being observed will change their behavior when they know they’re being observed, thus skewing the effects of the research.

To learn more about the Avondale, click here.

*

hawthorn

The Sears Hawthorne, from the 1916 catalog.

*

MORE

Interior view of the Sears Avondale.

*

Hawthorne 2

Do those benches qualify as inglenooks? I would say - maybe - but writing these blogs is a lot of work and very time consuming and it's 6:23 am and I'm in no mood to go back and change a lot of text. Speaking of houses, check out that oak slat screen on the right side of this image. Now that's gorgeous.

*

Avondale

Shot of the large bay window in the front bedroom, and my grandfather's dresser, flanked by two sconces. Also check out that sweet light fixture. That's a beauty.

*

Hawthorne in 1916

The Hawthorne, as seen in the 1916 catalog, together with a lady in pain (right side) wearing a corset that's obviously way, way too tight.

*

rebecca

Rebecca Hunter found this Hawthorne in Piper City, north of Champaign, Illinois. Photo is copyright 2012 Rebecca Hunter and may not be used or reprinted without permission. Rebecca's website is www.kithouse.org.

*

hawthorne in mattoon

This Hawthorne in Mattoon, Illinois was supersized. That height of that second floor was doubled to create much more space upstairs. In 2004, I toured the inside of this home and it's a real beauty.

*

hawtorne

Comparison of the floorplans of the Avondale (left) and the Hawthorne (right).

*

hwthorneeee

View of the 2nd floor on the Hawthorne.

*

ham radio

One of my favorite Avondales. It's in Litchfield, Illinois.

*

hawthorne

Rebecca found this modified Avondale in northern Illinois. An entire 2nd floor was added a few years ago. In 2010, Rebecca and I spent several days driving throughout the suburbs of Chicago, and she showed me the many fun kit homes that she'd discovered through her years of research. This was one of the most intriguing.

*

Visit Rebecca Hunter’s website here.

More on Avondales here.

*

That Rascally Haskell

March 30th, 2017 Sears Homes 4 comments

Today, despite all the publicity about recycling, we’re still a very wasteful society, and even more so when it comes to housing.

More than 35% of all debris at modern landfills is construction debris. HGTV is the worst offender, encouraging millions to rip out and destroy old kitchens and baths, while violating  the first commandment of old house ownership: “Thou Shalt Not Destroy Good Old Work.”

A century ago, when Penniman was abandoned, the overwhelming majority of the houses were “knocked down” (disassembled board by board) and moved to another site. Some of the houses were moved intact and whole. Today, the majority of these houses are still alive and well in Norfolk and Williamsburg.

And now, thanks to the foresight of the Whisnant family, we have pictures of the residential area of Penniman, showing these houses within this village, built by DuPont for workers at the shell-loading plant. Below, you’ll see images of the “Haskell,” living in Penniman and later in Norfolk.

To learn more about the Penniman houses in Williamsburg, click here.

Read about the Norfolk Penniman houses here.

Images below are courtesy of the family of Joseph and Ola Whisnant. Thanks to the foresight and generosity of the Whisnant family, we have street views and genre scenes of life in Penniman. Cameras were probably forbidden within the cantonment of Penniman, and visitors would have subjected to a daunting search of their personal belongings, entering and exiting. These images are the only known existing photographs of the residential areas of Penniman.

*

house

Street view of the newly created village of Penniman. The streets are mud and the houses are fresh and new. The village was built in 1918 and abandoned in early 1920. Photos are courtesy of the Whisnant family.

*

Whisnant

Another view of the village. Notice the hydrant to the right with the easy-to-access valve. The model of houses shown in this picture (Cumberland, Florence, Haskell and a piece of the Georgia) eventually landed in Norfolk and Williamsburg, Virginia.

*

whisnant fam

A close-up of the Haskell.

*

others

Thanks to the Norfolk city assessor, we have a picture of this same model, taken in the 1950s. There are more than 50 of these homes - built at DuPont's Penniman - along Major Avenue and Glenroie Avenue in Norfolk.

*

fesef

Comparison of the house in Norfolk (1950s) and the house in Penniman (1918).

*

House

This "Haskell" has been resided with a substitute PVC-type shake, and the belt course on the gable line was moved up closer to the peak. Other than that, it looks much as it did when built in 1918.

*

whisnant

The Haskell, as it appeared in a building catalog in 1920.

*

Thanks to clyde Vir Pilot December 1921

In December 1921, these houses were moved from Penniman to Norfolk via barge. Many thanks to professional photographer Clyde Nordan for cleaning up the images. (Virginian Pilot, December 1921.)

*

To learn more about the Penniman houses in Williamsburg, click here.

Read about the Norfolk Penniman houses here.

*

Moving On With Life

February 4th, 2017 Sears Homes 9 comments

These last few months, I’ve lived in a small rental home in Southeastern Virginia, and most of my possessions are in storage, which is discomfiting. A few weeks ago, I started looking at houses for sale in different cities.

Throughout 2015 and early 2016, I had a recurring nightmare that Wayne had died and I was forced to move into a modest (and dirty) rental house. It was terrifying, and it was one of those dreams that just went on and on and on for what felt like days.

On one occasion, I wrote this in my prayer journal, “Thank God it was just a dream. Wayne is still alive and well. I am so grateful to awaken from that horror, and find myself sleeping in my own bed in my beautiful home, in my soft bed, with my husband asleep beside me.”

In April 2016, that nightmare became my reality. In August 2016, I started looking at rental homes and became physically ill when I viewed my first rental: A dirty, greasy, roach-infested house, with busted asbestos tiles on the floor, bugs scurrying across the broken Formica countertop and a filthy tub outlined in soap scum.

The price was $1,200 a month - the top of my “comfort level.”

I left that house in tears, got in my car and drove around, trying to pray and trying not to cry. Ultimately, I found a sparkling clean rental in a safe area, but it wasn’t cheap.

It’s been nine months since Wayne died and looking at houses to buy has proven to be a tonic for me. Little by little, the lights are starting to come back on in my soul. It’s funny what God can use to breathe life into someone that feels dead and buried deep in the rubble.

Perhaps in my case, it will be nothing fancier than an old house that needs a lot of love and tender care and elbow grease and time (and a little money) to be restored to its former grandeur and original beauty. Maybe saving an old house will be the very thing that saves me.

*

Rosemary

When I look at a house, I really LOOK at a house. It was a miserable crawl space and way too low, but I had to know if the house was sound and worthy of restoration. The next day, this 57-year-old body felt the challenge of slithering through a dirty crawl space. Of course, someone was there with a camera...

*

To read more about Rose, click here.

*

And Then Jennifer Found an “Ellison” in Hershey, Pennsylvania!

February 16th, 2016 Sears Homes 2 comments

Almost as exciting as finding an Ellison (a fancy Sears house I’ve never seen before) is that this “Ellison” is in Hershey, Pennsylvania, and (this just gets better and better), the Sears “Ellison” that Jennifer found is at 266 Maple Avenue, less than a half mile from Chocolate Avenue.

Yes, you heard that right: Less than a half mile from Chocolate Avenue.

But I digress.

Jennifer Hoover-Vogel posted this Ellison in our Facebook group and I’m embarrassed to admit this, but I stayed up way past my bedtime looking at this house and confirming it was indeed an Ellison.

And I’m confident that it is the real deal.

Multitudinous thanks to Jennifer Hoover-Vogel for finding this house and getting some lovely photos!

To learn more about chocolate, click here.

Join us on Facebook by clicking here.

*

The Sears Ellison was offered throughout the 1930s.

The Sears Ellison was offered throughout the 1930s.

*

FF

The exterior measured 55'10" by 36'8". The first floor bedroom is 17'6" wide, which is large by Sears standards. And the living room is 15 by 21, which is quite spacious.

*

The second floor

The second floor has an interesting layout with two bedrooms and an L-shaped hallway. I love that the bathroom is within that first dormer. Seems like a practical arrangement.

*

This demonstrates passion for old houses! Jennifer went out in the snow on Sunday to get good photos of this lovely old Sears kit home!

This demonstrates true commitment! Jennifer went out in the snow on Sunday to get good photos of this lovely old Sears kit home! Fabulous find, and a fabulous picture. Photo is copyright 2016 Jennifer Hoover-Vogel and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Check out the detail on that front window.

Check out the detail on that front window. Are these original windows? Hard to know. Photo is copyright 2016 Jennifer Hoover-Vogel and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

And from Google, we can see down the side.

And thanks to Google, we can see down the side.

*

The floorplan

The detailed floorplan (from the assessor's website) shows it's a good match, too.

*

FFF

Be still my quivering (and shivering) heart. We're always left wondering how many of these "hard-to-find" models were ever built. Thanks again to Jennifer for finding this one! Photo is copyright 2016 Jennifer Hoover-Vogel and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Thanks to Jennifer Hoover-Vogel for finding this house and getting some lovely photos!

To learn more about chocolate, click here.

Join us on Facebook by clicking here.

*

Finding the CUSTOMIZED Houses That Sears Built, Part III

February 13th, 2016 Sears Homes 1 comment

Updated! We have some beautiful photos now!!

*

Click here to see the new pictures!

*

Thanks to a remarkable and rare document that came into my life, Rachel Shoemaker and I have been able to find several customized Sears Homes. One of these is in Glen Ellyn (a Chicago suburb) and it’s a real beauty.

Absent this document (which wholly authenticates this as a Sears House), I’d never have known that this was a “Sears kit home.”

As with the other customized Sears Home we found, this house in Glen Ellyn was also owned by a high-ranking Sears employee, who started at Sears in the 1910s and remained with the company for many years.

According to city records, it was built in 1930 (which is probably about right) and has almost 4,500 square feet. Apparently, it hasn’t been offered for sale in many years, for there is no record of recent sales.

The photos below aren’t very good quality, and if anyone in the Chicago area would like to snap some better images, I’d be grateful!

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

*

Yes, this is a Sears kit house.

This beautiful Colonial Revival is a Sears kit house, ordered by a long-time Sears employee. The bay window has a copper roof and the primary roof appears to be slate (although it is hard to be sure). Thanks to the county assessor for providing such a lovely photo!

*

Located in Glen Ellyn.

It's hard to tell from these low-resolution images, but I suspect that those are copper gutters and it appears to be a solid-brick home. This was (and is) a very well-built home, and spacious, with almost 4,500 square feet.

*

Front door is intriguing Jefferson

Shown here is a Sears Jefferson in Carbondale, Illinois. Take a look at that entrance. It is a match to the house in Glen Ellyn - right down to the details. The Jefferson in Carbondale was built in the late 1920s.

*

Match front door

Here's a close-up of that front door on the Jefferson.

*

Preston

The customized Sears House in Glen Ellyn is also a little reminiscent of the Sears Preston.

*

Inside

The Preston was pretty fancy inside.

*

Houses 1921

It's likely that the interior of the Glen Ellyn house has a few of these extra touches, too.

*

Do they know

I'd love to get some bettter images of this house in Glen Ellyn, but for now, these will have to do! And it sure would be fun to know if the home's current owners know that they have a "Sears kit house"!

*

To read about the other customized Sears Homes, click here.

Sometimes, Sears Homes look a lot like plan book homes.

*

Kit Homes in Kinston - What a Bonanza!

January 25th, 2016 Sears Homes 2 comments

Was I surprised to find 19 Aladdin kit homes in Kinston? My oh my, yes! And those 19 were found during a very quick windshield survey. There are more lurking about, I’m sure.

Last week, my husband and I visited New Bern, and while there, we drove out to Kinston to look at the local architecture. Lo and behold, we found an Aladdin kit home on almost every street in the older neighborhoods. In one memorable area (near Harding and Pollock Streets) we found seven Aladdin homes together.

The older suburbs we visited had many wide-open spaces, suggesting that many of these early 20th Century kit homes have already been demolished.

If you’re new to this website, you may be wondering, what is a kit home? In the early 1900s, aspiring homeowners could order a “kit home” from the Sears Roebuck catalog. Each 12,000-piece kit came with a 75-page instruction book and a promise that the neophyte homebuilder could have the house ready for  occupancy in 90 days. In addition to Sears, there were other companies selling kit homes through mail-order catalogs, such as Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan) and Gordon Van Tine (Davenport, Iowa).

Aladdin was bigger than Sears, in business longer, and sold more homes than Sears, but they’re not as well known as Sears. Aladdin had a mill in Wilmington, North Carolina, which explains why Aladdin Homes were so popular in the Southeast.

Based on my research, the overwhelming majority of people living in these kit homes didn’t know what they had, until I contacted them (or they discovered their home on my blog).

What was the industry that promoted Kinston’s growth in the early 1900s, and put them on the map? Industries often turned to Aladdin to supply housing for the workers. It’s likely that someone turned to Aladdin for the houses we’re now finding in Kinston, but who was it?

Lastly, before we get into the photos, I’m hoping some progressive-minded soul in Kinston will contact me about coming back to town to do a thorough survey. Perhaps identifying these bungalows as historically significant kit homes can be a key to revitalizing parts of Kinston.

Let’s hope.

Contact Rose by leaving a comment below.

In addition to the 19 Aladdin homes, I found a lone Gordon Van Tine home: The Peach House Restaurant! And it’s a real beauty! You can read more about that by clicking here!

You can read here about the kit homes I found in New Bern, NC.

UPDATE! We found a Montgomery Ward kit home in Kinston, too!

*

1914 Moosejaw

Aladdin sold more homes than Sears, but was not as well known.

*

1916

What was the industry that promoted Kinston's growth in the early 1900s, and put them on the map? It seems very likely that *that* employer turned to Aladdin to supply worker homes in Kinston.

*

houses

Aladdin had catalogs devoted to "solving the problem of industrial housing."

*

Aladdin 1916

Aladdin was named for the magical genie who built "a house in a day" for his master. Apparently, Old Genie is perusing the latest catalog to find a snappy design.

*

1919

The Shadow Lawn is one of my favorites. It was spacious and beautiful (1919).

*

Shadow two

When I drove in Kinston, the first house I spotted was this Aladdin Shadowlawn on Lenoir Avenue. Looks like it walked right off the pages of the 1919 catalog (shown above).

*

Shadow

During our brief time in Kinston, I initially missed this Shadowlawn (another beauty) on Atlantic Avenue. Shown above is a screenshot from Google Maps. It's another delightfully original house.

*

1916

The "Colonial" was probably Aladdin's biggest (and fanciest) kit home.

*

19 Colonial

And there's one in Kinston! Do the owners know that they're living in a kit home?

*

1919 Classic Bungalow

The Pomona was a classic early 20th Century bungalow (1919).

*

Pollock 805

This was my favorite Pomona in Kinston (which has three of them). This house still as so many of its original features, including the half-timber effect on the porch gable, original windows with diamond muntins and those rectangular eave brackets. And that appears to be an old wooden storm door.

*

305 Washington

This Pomona on Washington Street is also a lovely home, but its windows have been replaced.

*

810 Collge

The years have not been kind to this Pomona on College Street.

*

Carolina 1923

In all my travels, I'd never seen an Aladdin "Carolina." It seems fitting that there are not one but two Carolinas in Kinston, North Carolina. This image is from the 1923 catalog.

*

605 Rhem

This Carolina on Rhem Street is in picture-perfect condition.

*

308 Capitol

This is an Aladdin "Carolina" and it does have its original windows, so that's a plus. It's had some insensitive remodeling. Anything salt-treated on an old house is just not a good plan.

*

Willard 1919

I've not seen that many "Willards" in my travels, but there are two in Kinston (1919).

*

Details

It's also a cute little house with lots of interesting details and features.

*

Willard 413 Harding

And this Willard on Harding Street is perfect - right down to the lattice!

*

Willard on Harding

From every angle, it's a beauty!

*

Porch

And it's astounding that 100 years later, that lattice is still in such good shape.

*

811 Pollock

On an opposing corner, I found this Willard which has had some remodeling, but still looks a lot like a Willard. It's a pity that the guy-wire got in the way of an otherwise perfect picture.

*

1919

The Virginia was a popular house for Aladdin (1919).

*

310 Capitola

This "Virginia" on Capitola Street is next door to the Carolina shown above!

*

Capitola

Okay, so we lost the little girl (in the image on the right) and gained a trash can, but other than that, it's a lovely match. And a pretty house, too!

*

Florence 1916

The Florence was a popular house for Aladdin and I've found an abundance of these in North Carolina's mill towns. There are two Florence models in Kinston.

*

Florence

And they're across the street from each other. This is on Harding.

*

406 Harding

And so is this one.

*

1919 BLVD

The Aladdin Boulevard was not a hugely popular house (1919).

*

BLVD

But it is distinctive with that low shed dormer and the window arrangement. The Boulevard has 12/1 windows on the front porch (1919).

*

Street

This was the first "Boulevard" I've ever seen. On this model, someone took out those living windows when they put in that fireplace. There's also an addition on the rear of the house.

*

House

In this picture, you can see those 12/1 windows on the Kinston "Boulevard."

*

1924 Sunshine

The "Sunshine" was a popular house with a really cute name (1924).

*

Sunshine

"You are my Sunshine, my only Sunshine..." This was the only Sunshine we found in Kinston.

*

Street

These four models were lined up like little soldiers in a row on Pollock Street in Kinston.

*

Harassment Street

The Willard is to the far left, with the Sunshine next, the Boulevard beyond it, and the Pomona at the end of the run. Kitty-corner to this Willard was The Perfect Willard, and the two Florences are behind this WIllard. These are the seven Aladdins mentioned above.

*

Bruns 1923

I've been looking for an Aladdin Brunswick for a long time, butt prior to coming to Kinston, I'd never laid eyes on the real deal (1923 catalog).

*

509 Washington

And Kinston has two of them. This house is on West Washington.

*

Brunsh

A distinctive feature of the Brunswick is this window arrangement on the side of the house. The centered window is a staircase-landing window. The small windows are closet windows.

*

Brusnswisk

This is another house that I missed on my first drive through town, and found when I was double-checking addresses via Google Maps. It's in pitiable shape. It's just off Perry and Atlantic, and just around the corner from that stunning Aladdin Shadowlawn. I hope this home has a hope of restoration.

*

GVT

And the Gordon Van Tine #705 was the only non-Aladdin home I found in Kinston.

*

Moo

Now this is a beautiful house - and it's also a restaurant!

*

Gustatory Delights

Had we only been more familiar with the delicious delights offered at The Gordon Van Tine #705 Restaurant, errr, the "Peach House" we would have stopped there for lunch!

*

At the end of the day,

At the end of our trip to Kinston, Hubby was mighty glad to get back to our "home away from home," The Aerie Bed and Breakfast in New Bern. He was tired of looking at houses.

*

You can visit The Peach House website here.

To read about what I found in nearby New Bern, click here.

*

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Real Peach Of A House - in Kinston, NC

January 24th, 2016 Sears Homes 6 comments

It’d sure be fun to learn more about the history of Kinston, North Carolina. When my husband and I were there last week, we found a surfeit of Aladdin kit homes, and yet there in the middle of all these Aladdin Homes, we spotted a Gordon Van Tine #705 in peachy-keen condition!

Later, we learned that this beautiful old bungalow is also a restaurant, known as The Peach House, and better yet, it’s received many rave reviews. When we return to Kinston, I’d love to drop in for lunch!

A little bit about kit homes: In the early 1900s, you could order a “kit home” from the Sears Roebuck catalog. These 12,000-piece kits came with a 75-page instruction book that told the homeowner how all those pieces and parts went together. In addition to Sears, there were other companies selling kit homes through mail-order catalogs, such as Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan) and Gordon Van Tine (Davenport, Iowa).

It’s not surprising to find so many Aladdins in this part of the country, because Aladdin had a large mill in nearby Wilmington, North Carolina. Finding a GVT is a bit of a surprise!

Thanks so much to Joni McRae for sharing information on The Peach House and providing additional photos!

We found 19 Aladdin kit homes in Kinston. See the photos here!

You can visit The Peach House website here.

To read about what I found in nearby New Bern, click here.

And there’s Roanoke Rapids, which has a large collection of Aladdin Homes.

*

Gordon Van Tine #705

Gordon Van Tine #705 as seen in the 1918 catalog.

*

Cool

Model #705 featured four bedrooms, but none of them were very large.

*

Now thats a fine-looking house.

Now that's a fine-looking house.

*

And there

That is one beautiful house! And the color makes me swoon. Photo is copyright 2015 Joni McRae and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

A historically sensitive addition was added to the homes rear.

A "historically sensitive" addition created extra living space. Photo is copyright 2015 Joni McRae and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

And even though its an über-crummy picture, it shows the OTHER side of this perfect peach.

And even though it's an über-crummy picture, it shows the OTHER side of this perfect peach. (Yes, it's my photo. I thought I had a moment to snap this picture in peace, and then a car turned in just behind me. )

*

It was a peach of a house 30 years ago, even though it was plain old white.

It was a peach of a house 40 years ago, even though it was plain old white. Photo is courtesy Joni McRae.

*

And you can go inside and have a snack!

Best of all, you can go inside The Peach House and have lunch ! For more information, visit their website at www.peachhousenc.com. The house is located at 412 W. Vernon Avenue, Kinston.

*

Last but not least, heres another GVT #705 I found in my Aunt Addies hometown, Lake Mills, Wisconsin.

Last but not least, here's another GVT #705 I found in my Aunt Addie's hometown, Lake Mills, Wisconsin.

*

This factory in Kinston appears abandoned, and yet its surrounded by a surfeit on Aladdin kit homes. Was this an old mill? Id love to know.

This factory in Kinston appears abandoned, and yet it's surrounded by a surfeit of Aladdin kit homes. Was this an old mill? I'd love to know.

*

Thanks so much to Joni McRae for sharing information on The Peach House and providing additional photos!

To read about what I found in nearby New Bern, click here.

And there’s Roanoke Rapids, which has a large collection of Aladdin Homes.

*

Something For My “Wish List”

December 3rd, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Updated! Jennifer found one!

Of the 370 models of kit homes offered by Sears & Roebuck, there are about 150 models that I’ve never seen. One of the most intriguing is the “Monterey.” It was very similar to the highly popular Sears Alhambra, but with a few minor differences, both inside and out.

The Monterey was offered only in the 1924 catalog, which is a fairly rare catalog. The Alhambra was offered for about a decade and proved to be highly popular and yet its “kissing cousin” seems to have never caught on. And of the two houses, I’d think the Monterey would be more popular.

One very commen complaint about the Alhambra is that roof leaks behind those dormers are very common (see image below), and “crickets” have to be added to deflect rain water away from the dormers. If you look at the photos below, you’ll see that the Monterey was designed with those crickets already in place. And the Monterey has a gabled roof over the staircase wing, rather than a flat roof (like the Alhambra).

I’m a big fan of the Alhambra but the Monterey’s dramatic parapet is snazzier and more appealing. And to think that I’ve never seen one in real life! The humanity!

Is there a Sears Monterey in your neighborhood?

If so, please let me know.

To read more about The Alhambra, click here.

Do you have a Sears Home? Learn more here.

*

The Sears Monterey was offered only in the 1924 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Sears Monterey was offered only in the 1924 Sears Modern Homes catalog, which might be one reason why there aren't many of these (if any) in the world.

*

In this image, you can see the cricket behind that dormer.

In this image, you can see the "cricket" behind that dormer, which deflects rain water and helps prevent leaks behind that dormer. Plus, that staircase wing has a gabled roof, instead of the flat roof present on the Alhambra.

*

Its very close to the Sears Alhambra, and in the 1924 catalog, theyre on opposing sides of the same page.

The Monterey is very similar to the Sears Alhambra, and in the 1924 catalog, they're on opposing sides of the same two-page spread. The "interior photos" are apparently a fit for either the Monterey or Alhambra.

*

A side-by-side comparison of the two floor plans show some minor differences of the two houses.

A side-by-side comparison of the two floor plans show some minor differences of the two houses. The Monterey is on the right. The most striking difference is that someone moved the baby grand piano.

*

There are several differences on the second floor, too.

In this image, the Monterey is on the left side (oops), and the Alhambra is on the right. One curiosity is that bathroom. In the Monterey, the sink was placed in what seems to be a very awkward spot. Closets have also been shifted around a bit.

*

fff

That living room is just dazzling, and I love the chaise on the sunporch. That floor lamp with the fringe is pretty sweet too, and who doesn't love pink curtains? The 1924 catalog had several color images (such as shown on this blog) and yet it's a fairly rare catalog.

*

tes

I wonder how often people followed the color suggestions for these homes.

*

Sears

Now that is a fine-looking house! I'd love to find one - somewhere.

*

To read more about The Alhambra, click here.

Do you have a Sears Home? Learn more here.

*

Solar Power: So Much Fun (Part II)

November 21st, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

Three years ago (November 20, 2012) I did a blog on my first foray into the world of solar energy. Since then, I’ve added and upgraded my system a bit. I’ve taken a break from traveling and writing about kit homes, so I thought I’d do a blog today on my new “solar system.”

If you have any questions or insights, please leave a comment below!

To read about Sears Homes, click here.

Want to read my prior blog on solar energy? Here’s the link.

*

Solar

Three years ago, I installed my first "solar system" on my little back yard shed.

*

fff

I purchased this "Thunderbolt" solar panel kit from Harbor Freight. Thunderbolt strikes me as a silly name, but it's a good solid product. Each panel produces 15 watts.

*

This Spring, we had a new roof put on the house and shed, and after we had that work done, I couldnt bear to put those solar panels back on the pretty new roof.

This Spring, we had a new roof put on the house and shed, and after we had that work done, I couldn't bear to put those solar panels back on the pretty new roof.

*

Instead, I decided maybe it was time to upgrade a little bit.

Instead, I decided maybe it was time to upgrade a little bit. Pre-new roof, I had two sets of three panels atop the little shed roof. Each set of three produced 45 watts. The Thunderbolt solar panels were amorphous thin-film panels (older technology) while the newer panel (shown here on the side) is a crystalline panel which produces 100-watts with a single panel.

*

fffee

And it looks snappy, too. The panel is manufactured by Renogy.

*

I mounted the solar panel to the wall using a 360-degree flat-screen TV mount. It was on sale at Amazon for $19 and was exactly what I needed. This model has a feature (probably undesirable to many) that after the arm is pivoted where you want it, it can be tightened into place so it never moves again.

I mounted the solar panel to the wall using a 360-degree flat-screen TV mount. It was on sale at Amazon for $19 and was exactly what I needed. This model has a feature (probably undesirable to many) that after the arm is pivoted into position, it can be tightened into place so it never moves again.

*

And mounting it on the side means I didnt need to drill fresh holes in that expensive new roof.

And mounting it on the side means I didn't need to drill fresh holes in that expensive new roof.

*

Ive now got three 12-volt deep cycle marine batteries.

Inside, there were some upgrades too. I've now got three 12-volt deep cycle marine batteries. The battery on the floor is the one I use for my trolling motor, when I go out on the lake.

*

Prior to last week, I was using this MPPT solar charge controller

Prior to last week, I was using this MPPT solar charge controller. This little jewel cost $130 on Amazon and lasted only five months before it died. And it didn't die easy. It took out one of my digital meters when it went. Plus, it didn't just stop charging the battery; it was actually draining the batteries down to 4 volts. MPPT stands for Maximum Power Point Tracking.

*

You can read more about MPPT by clicking here. It’s a webpage unto itself.

*

This was

Shown above is the PWM (pulse width modulation) solar charge controller than came with the 100-watt Renogy panel. We'll see how it does. It's the dirt-poor cousin of the MPPT solar charge controller. If it lasts more than five months, it'll be my new hero.

*

Upgrade

With those three batteries, I was able to upgrade the inverter a bit, too. Shown above is a 1600-watt inverter. The green display shows the current charge on the battery. The now-dead meter above showed the incoming voltage on the solar panels.

*

And I added a few lights, too.

And I added a few lights, too. Inside, I have four LED 12-volt lights. I mounted this one outside. It's also available at Amazon for the low, low price of $11.97 (or was). This small fixture puts out a surprising amount of light.

*

The old solar set-up was a lot of fun, and it lives on at Miltons house (my buddy and next-door neighbor). Three years later, its still performing like a champ.

The old solar set-up was a lot of fun, and it lives on at Milton's house (my buddy and next-door neighbor). Three years later, it's still performing like a champ.

*

Want to become a licensed ham radio operator? Check this out!

If you’re here to read about Sears kit homes, click here.

*

Categories: Uncategorized Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

An Aladdin Westwood - in Charlottesville, Virginia

August 23rd, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

The Aladdin Westwood was offered only in the 1922 catalog, which is curious. It’s a beautiful house and quite massive, but apparently the Sovereign brothers decided it wasn’t a keeper. In September 2013, I gave a talk in nearby Louisa, Virginia and drove over to Charlottesville to see what was lurking in Hoo-ville.

What a sweet surprise to find an Aladdin Westwood at the end of a quiet residential street!

I was with a local historian and we knocked on the doors repeatedly but no one showed up. It’s been two years since I was there. Hope this house survives! These big Aladdin houses don’t do well in college towns. In nearby Williamsburg, Virginia, an Aladdin Colonial was torn down on the William and Mary campus (about 15 years ago).

To read about the other kit homes I found in Charlottesville, click here.

~~~

The Aladdin

The Aladdin Westwood was offered only in the 1922 catalog.

~

One of the best parts of playing with kit homes is studying the old floor plans.

One of the best parts of playing with kit homes is studying the old floor plans. I just love looking at these old images, and thinking about day-to-day life in early 20th Century America. The house was about 3,000 square feet - which isn't typical for a kit home! And there's a half-bath on the first floor (1922).

*

Sfe

Not only does the second floor have two full bathrooms (very unusualy for the 1920s), but the front bathroom has a shower! Now that's high living! (1922 catalog)

*

Sounds fancy, too!

Sounds fancy, too! And it mentions that shower on the "front bathroom" (1922).

*

fff

What a beautiful house!

*

And check out that front door!

And check out that front door!

*

In all

I was pretty tickled to find this sweet thing in Charlottesville. To date, it's the only Westwood I've ever seen.

*

And check out the detail around that front door.

And check out the detail around that front door.

*

And check out that front door!

Nice match, isn't it?

*

I tried desperately to get a long shot of the house and show that hipped roof, but landscaping prevented it.

I tried desperately to get a long shot of the house and show that hipped roof, but landscaping prevented it.

*

If you look down the side, you can see its a good match.

If you look down the side, you can see it's a good match, all the windows are in the right places. It's surprising to see that the columns are still in such good shape. They're almost 100 years old now.

*

The Aladdin Westwood looks like the Aladdin Villa in many ways.

The Aladdin Westwood looks like the Aladdin Villa in many ways.

*

But the footprint and floorplan are radically different.

But the footprint and floorplan are radically different.

*

Its sad to see that the house has been turned into a duplex, but I suppose we should rejoice that - living in a college town - it still survives.

It's sad to see that the house has been turned into a duplex, but I suppose we should rejoice that - living in a college town - it still survives. College towns are notorious "bungalow eaters."

*

To read about the other kit homes I found in Charlottesville, click here.

Here are some images of the kit homes in Louisa, Virginia.

~~~~