Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Sears kit Homes’

Bedford, Pennsylvania, Part II

June 15th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

Last week, I wrote about a customized Osborn in Bedford, Pennsylvania, hoping to get my hands on contemporary pictures! This weekend, Andrew and Wendy Mutch kindly sent me some wonderful pictures of this one-of-a-kind Osborn.

To learn more about this gorgeous house, visit the prior blog here. If you’re just here for the pictures, enjoy!  :D

Thanks to Rachel Shoemaker for finding this house in Bedford, and thanks to Andrew and Wendy for taking the time to photograph this old Sears house!

To visit Rachel’s website, click here.

Andrew and Wendy Mutch have a website, too!

To read more about the Sears Osborn, click here.

*

Sears

About 30% of Sears Homes were customized when built, and this Osborn in Bedford is at the far end of the customization spectrum! It had so much customization (and was such a stunning example), that it was promoted in the 1931 “Homes of Today” Sears Modern Homes catalog.

*

Goodrich, huh? Wonder if hes any kin to THE Goodrich Tire folks?

Goodrich, huh? Wonder if he's any kin to THE Goodrich Tire folks?

*

The tile roof makes me swoon. What a perfect choice.

The tile roof makes me swoon. What a perfect choice.

*

Oh yeah, baby. There it is.

Oh yeah, baby. There it is. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Little side-by-side action here.

Little side-by-side action here. Stunning, isn't it?

*

It appears our Customized Osborn is getting a little fixing-up. Lets all hope and pray that its a RESTORATION and not a remodel. Shudder.

It appears our Customized Osborn is getting a little "nip and tuck" work done. Let's all hope and pray that it's a RESTORATION and not a remodel. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

It is a beautiful house, and the stone work is breath-taking.

It is a beautiful house, and the stone work is breath-taking. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

A longer view of our gorgeous Osborn (born 1931).

A longer view of our gorgeous Osborn (born 1931). Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

W

What a house. You have to wonder if the home's owners wake up every morning and exclaim, "I own the prettiest house in all of Pennsylvania." If not, they should. The more I look at this house, the more I love it. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Close-up on some of the details.

Close-up on some of the details. I see they're between roofs right now. I wonder if they're going back with tile. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

What a house!

What a house! Be still my quivering heart!

*

Thanks again to Rachel Shoemaker for finding this house in Bedford and supplying the 1931 images.

Many thanks to Andrew and Wendy for taking the time to photograph this old Sears house!

To read more about the Sears Osborn, click here.

*

Do You Live Near Bedford, Pennsylvania? If So, You Should See This House!

June 6th, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

UPDATED! To see contemporary photos, click here!

In 2005, I drove the length of The Lincoln Highway and went right through Bedford, Pennsylvania, and yet I didn’t see this beautiful, customized Sears House.

Rachel Shoemaker discovered it recently, and it’s a real doozy, but we really need some good photos! If anyone within the sound of my voice is near Bedford and can get photos, that’d be swell.

Now, about that house.

At least 30% of Sears Homes were customized when built, and this Osborn in Bedford had so much customization (and was such a profound beauty), that it was promoted in the 1931 “Homes of Today” Sears Modern Homes catalog! Apparently, it was for sale recently, and that’s how Rachel found these interior photos.

Many thanks to Rachel for finding this house in Bedford!

To read about our other discoveries in Bedford, click here.

To read more about the Sears Osborn (and read my #1 favorite blog), click here.

To visit Rachel’s site, click here.

*

The Sears Osborn (customized) in Bedford.

The Sears Osborn (customized) in Bedford.

*

A little more info on its construction

A little more info on its construction. If I were the home's owner, I'd be most eager to learn more of its history. In fact, I'd be close to apoplectic if someone showed up and told me this.

*

Gorgeous house, but not-so-gorgeous photo.

Gorgeous house, but not-so-gorgeous photo. Are you near Beford? If so, we'd love to get a picture! The house is on South Juliana Street in Bedford, Pennsylvania. Please send me a message if you want the precise address!

*

Apparently, it was for sale recently, and these photos were shown with the listing.

Apparently, it was for sale recently, and these photos were shown with the listing. That stone work is breathtakingly beautiful, and a nice complement to the pine paneling.

*

Another view of the interior

Another view of the interior. I'm loving that stone and pine. WOW!

*

An original kitchen

That kitchen just slays me. Just gorgeous. Absolutely gorgeous.

(

WR

Oh man, what a house. WHAT a house!!*

*

So, who loves in Bedford and wants to get a photo?  :D

So, who loves in Bedford and wants to get a photo? :D

*

And just down the road, Bedford also has this beautiful Alhambra!

And just down the road, Bedford also has this beautiful Alhambra (another Sears House)!

*

To read more about the Sears Osborn (and read my #1 favorite blog), click here.

To visit Rachel’s site, click here.

*

A Sears Detroit, Just Outside of Detroit!

June 4th, 2015 Sears Homes 6 comments

While doing research on Sears’ mortgages in Troy, Detroit, fellow researchers Andrew and Wendy Mutch found a mortgage for this house on Daley Road! It appears to be a Sears “Detroit,” which is a model I’ve never seen before - so that suggests it’s a fairly rare model. And it was only offered in the 1932 and 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog. (Troy is about 22 miles north of Detroit, Michigan.)

There are a few head-scratchers with this one, though. The mortgage was recorded in June 1931, but “Detroit” didn’t make an appearance until the 1932 catalog. Secondly, the city assessor’s website gives a build date of 1930, but those are often unreliable. Lastly, the chimney for the house is in the wrong place.

The Sears Detroit shows the chimney right in the roof’s valley (a terrible spot for a chimney), but the house in Troy has the chimney outside of the valley.

Did the home’s first owners (Stuart and Hilda Baker) have the wisdom and foresight to shift that chimney a bit, and move it out of the valley? Or was the house customized (perhaps with a larger kitchen) which moved the chimney to the side a bit? Unfortunately, the assessor’s website doesn’t give the home’s dimensions.

Thanks so much to Andrew and Wendy Mutch for doing this research and discovering this unusual home! And thanks also to Andrew and Wendy for sharing their photos!

To read more about the Sears Homes in Michigan, click here.

To visit the Mutch’s website, click here!

We have a fun group on Facebook. Click here to learn more.

*

The Sears Detroit was first offered in the 1932 catalog.

The Sears "Detroit" was first offered in the 1932 catalog.

*

And it last appeared in 1933.

And it last appeared in 1933.

*

House

It's a mere 875 square feet.

*

It has some interesting windows.

The assymetrical front gable and small window is a distinctive feature that can help identify the Sears Detroit. Notice that the chimney pokes up right in the roof's valley.

*

Here it is

The house in Troy has a chimney that's offset from the valley. With the Sears mortgage, it's almost certainly a Sears House, but is it a modified Detroit? Might well be. More than 30% of Sears Homes were customized when built. Expanding the kitchen a bit would change the placement of that chimney. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Another view of the Sears Detroit.

Another view of the Sears Detroit. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Look down the left side of the floorplan.

Look down the left side of the floorplan. It sure is a good match down the left side, and this is a rather unique arrangement. The living room is pretty large, considering that the whole house is only 875 sfla.

*

Something

It's a good match down the right side, too but something really weird is doing on with that bathroom window. I'm not sure what to make of this. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Andrew and Wendy need to get themselves one of those Ronco Pocket Chain Saws to deal with these landscaping problems.

Andrew and Wendy need to get themselves one of those Ronco Pocket Chain Saws to deal with these unfortunate landscaping issues. I'm sure the oners wouldn't mind seeing the house get a little trim. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Do you have a Detroit in YOUR neighborhood?

Do you have a Detroit in YOUR neighborhood?

*

I see its been exactly 30 days since I wrote a blog for this site. Frankly, its garden season here in Hampton Roads and Ive spent many a happy hour digging in the dirt, trimming the azaleas, planting the tomatoes and having fun outside. Well, there have been episodes Id deign less than fun, such as when I was off the fascia and soffit, and managed to fall over backwards in the front flowerbed, which, it turns out, is a really bad idea if you have a cute little pagoda in that front flower bed. Fortunately, the various owies associated with this event are almost healed.

I see it's been exactly 30 days since I wrote a new blog, and there are some specific reasons for that. For one, it's garden season here in Hampton Roads and I've spent many a happy hour digging in the dirt, trimming the azaleas, planting the tomatoes and having fun outside. Well, there have been "episodes" which I'd assert were LESS than fun, such as when I was reaching way over my head, washing off the fascia and soffit with a long-handled brush, and managed to fall over backwards in the front flowerbed, which, it turns out, is a really bad idea if you have a cute little pagoda in that front flower bed. Fortunately, the multitudinous owies associated with this event are almost healed. Almost.

*

Thanks so much to Andrew and Wendy Mutch for finding this unusual home!

To read more about the Sears Homes in Michigan, click here.

To visit the Mutch’s website, click here!

We have a fun group on Facebook. Click here to learn more.

*     *      *

Aladdin Kit Homes - Build Your Own

May 5th, 2015 Sears Homes 6 comments

No

No profound and loquacious blogs today: Just a very cool advertisement from 1915.

*

But whats really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

But what's really interesting is when you zoom in a bit on the prices.

*

And zoom in just a bit more...

And zoom in just a bit more...

*

To read about the Aladdin Carnation (shown above on the left), click here.

To learn more about the Aladdins in Roanoke Rapids, click here.

*

Oscar Heppe’s Ivanhoe

May 1st, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Almost five years ago, I wrote a blog on the Sears Ivanhoe in LaGrange, Illinois (discovered in a promotional flyer), and mentioned that it’d be fun to have a contemporary photo of the 1913-built house.

Some time later, William Frymark found the house in LaGrange and sent me three beautiful pictures of this grand old Sears kit house!

Too often, these 100-year-old Sears Homes end up getting torn down or falling down, so it was a special treat to see that this LaGrange house still alive and well, and in beautiful condition.

Thanks so much to William  Frymark for finding this house and sending along the photos.

To read more about identifying Sears Homes, click here.

*

Roofing Flyer

The image above is from a brochure, promoting Sears building materials in general and roofing materials in particular. When I published that blog five years ago, I'd assumed Mr. Heeppes' home in LaGrange was brick. Turns out, it's all wood.

*

the

"Slate surfaced shingles" look better than slate or tile? I'm not so sure about that, Mr. Heppes. Unfortunately, this brochure did not include images of the wallboard in the living room, dining room and one bedroom. He implies here that the wallboard was better than plaster. Hmmm...

*

The Ivanhoe was a massive house.

The Ivanhoe was a massive house and one of the larger houses offered by Sears (1920).

*

Thats a big house.

That's a big house for its time, with more than 1,900 square feet of living area.

*

house

Complete with a bedroom for the maid!

*

Mr. Heppes Ivanhoe in LaGrange.

Mr. Heppes' Ivanhoe in LaGrange, about 1913.

*

Mr. Heppes Ivanhoe 102 years later.

Mr. Heppes' Ivanhoe 102 years later. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission. So there.

*

A nice shot down the side of the 102-year-old home in LaGrange.

A nice shot down the side of the 102-year-old home in LaGrange. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

side

Mr. Heppes' beautiful old house apparently had an addition put on the rear. Photo is copyright 2015 William Frymark and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Another faithful reader found this Ivanhoe in Monmouth, Illinois.

Another faithful reader found this Ivanhoe in Monmouth, Illinois. It's also in wonderfully original condition. Photo is copyright 2011 Carol Parish and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

I discovered this beauty in Lewisburg, West Virginia.

I discovered this beauty in Lewisburg, West Virginia.

*

Ivan

While visiting my daughter, I was surprised to find this Ivanhoe in a very ritzy neighborhood in Needham, Massachusetts (about 45 minutes from Boston).

*

And yet, Im still pining for one more picture of one more Ivanhoe. This house was featured in a testimonial and is in West Point, Virginia (not too far from me in Norfolk).

And yet, I'm still pining for one more picture of one more Ivanhoe. This house was featured in a testimonial and is in West Point, Virginia (not too far from me in Norfolk). It faces the Pamunkey River and we're looking at the backside (on West Euclid Boulevard). I've knocked on the door and sent them letters but no response. My kingdom for a tour of this beauty!

*

Thanks again to William Frymark for the wonderful photos of the Sears Ivanhoe in LaGrange!

To read more about the Sears Homes of West Point, click here.

*       *       *

Beautiful Six-Room Cottage: Modern Home #126

April 27th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

Modern Home #126 appeared in the 1908 Sears Modern Homes catalog (which was the year Sears opened their Modern Homes Department). By 1914, it shared a page with its fraternal twin, The Sears Elsmore (then known as Modern Home #208). By 1916, Modern Home #126 was gone.

In March 2002, The Houses That Sears Built hit the world and in a desperate bid to promote the book (and the topic), I did a survey of nearby Webster Groves, Missouri. (I was living in Alton, Illinois at the time - just across the Mississippi River from Webster Groves).

After doing the survey, I contacted several folks in Webster Groves and talked them into allowing me to give a lecture at the Webster Groves’ Library. Those were good times. It was my first “big” talk and was promoted in a local paper. We had about 80 people show up at the talk and 40 of them purchased a book! As I said, good times!

It was during that survey of Webster Groves that I found Modern Home #126. Rachel Shoemaker sent me a link to this house which recently sold. Unlike so many Realtor photos I’ve seen, the pictures of Modern Home #126 are beautifully done and in focus! Thanks to Circa Properties of St. Louis for allowing me to borrow these photos!  :) You can visit their website by clicking here.

To read about the Sears Homes in nearby Kirkwood, click here.

Did you know that Ferguson was the first city to hire me to do a survey of kit homes? I’ll always be grateful for the kindness of the people of Ferguson.

*

Modern Home #126 appeared in the first Sears Modern Homes catalog (1908).

Modern Home #126 appeared in the first Sears Modern Homes catalog (1908).

*

By 1914, Sears Modern Home #126 was relegated to sharing a page with the newly offered Modern Home #208 which would later be known as the Sears Elsmore.

By 1914, Sears Modern Home #126 was relegated to sharing a page with the newly offered "Modern Home #208" which would later be known as the Sears Elsmore. By 1916, #126 was no longer offered.

*

The Sears Elsmore became a popular house for Sears.

The Sears Elsmore became an immensely popular house for Sears (1921 catalog).

*

Testimonials

And yet, Modern Home #126 had been a popular model (judging by the testimonials).

*

The two homes shared a floorplan that was very close.

The two homes shared a floorplan that was very close. Perhaps do-it-yourself kit home builders didn't appreciate those chamfered corners on #126. Plus, the closets in #126 are a bit odd.

*

Those chamfered corners and oversized eaves do create a unique appearance!

Those chamfered corners and over-sized eaves do create a unique and dramatic appearance!

*

And heres Modern Home #126 in Webster Groves, one of my first discoveries!

And here's Modern Home #126 in Webster Groves, one of my "first" discoveries! And major kudos to the Realtor for snapping this photo from the right angle (to match the catalog page).

*

And what a sheer joy to see that this fine old home still has its original eyes (windows).

And what a sheer joy to see that this fine old home still has its original "eyes" (windows) and siding! Can you imagine how it'd ruin the look of this home to put in some pedestrian vinyl windows?

*

What a fine-looking home it is. Do the owners know that its a Sears House? This one, Id say maybe, because it was featured in that talk I gave in Webster Groves, so many years ago.

What a fine-looking home it is. Do the owners know that it's a Sears House? This one, I'd say "maybe," because it was featured in that talk I gave in Webster Groves, so many years ago.

*

The floorplan featured for this listing shows its a perfect match to the old catalog image.

The floorplan featured for this listing shows it's a pretty good match to the old catalog image. The minor changes shown above (bathroom modifications, closet enlargement and added staircase to 2nd floor) could have been done when the house was built or in later years. Houses do tend to get remodeled a bit through the years.

*

Cat

Modern Home #126 from the 1908 catalog.

*

The interior of the Webster Groves #126 is also stunning.

The interior of the Webster Groves #126 is also stunning.

*

The upstairs seems quite spacious. Im inclined to think that this 2nd floor was done when the home was built. The hipped roof on the Webster Groves house seems a bit higher than the standard-issue #126.

The upstairs seems quite spacious. Those four small dormers add a lot of light to the room. I'm inclined to think that this 2nd floor was done when the home was built but it's almost impossible to know for sure. This house is now 100 years old or more.

*

Heres another lovely #126 that Rebecca Hunter found in Quincy, Illinois.

Here's another lovely #126 that Rebecca Hunter found in Quincy, Illinois. It also has its original windows and siding (stucco). I find it most interesting that, without exception, every #126 I've seen has had columns or pillars added to that over-sized front porch overhang. Photo is copyright 2008 Rebecca Hunter and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

*

Lastly, heres Mr. Gilchrists Modern Home #126 at 2904 Meredith Avenue in Omaha, Nebraska!

Lastly, here's Mr. Gilchrist's Modern Home #126 at 2904 Meredith Avenue in Omaha, Nebraska! Photo is courtesy Douglas County Assessor's website (and they don't even KNOW how courteous they're being in sharing this image)!

*

Interested in purchasing a quality home in St. Louis? Visit Circa Properties website here!

Check out Rebecca Hunter’s website by clicking here.

To read about the Sears Homes in nearby Kirkwood, click here.

*     *     *

Sometimes Buying a House is a Real Roller Coaster Ride…

April 14th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

In the last 37 years, I’ve bought and sold a lot of houses and every single time, it’s an extremely stressful experience. However this real estate agent in Ermelo (in the Netherlands) found a fun and unique way to market this brick house.

He built a small roller coaster track throughout the five-bedroom house. An in-house speaker system gives a room-by-room narration of the home’s many features.

It’ll be interesting to see if the homes’ buyer wants the roller coaster to remain!

I would!

To see the full youtube video of the tour, click here.

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

*

He

I don't even like roller coasters, but this looks like fun!

*

House

The coaster enters through the garage and then into the basement.

*

To learn how to identify Sears Homes, click here.

*      *      *

My Only Blog With an “R” Rating!

April 6th, 2015 Sears Homes 5 comments

Before you start reading this, please usher the children into another room and/or tell them to cover their ears and hum.

Sears only offered two models of kit homes that had a sink in the closet. One was their fanciest house (”The Magnolia”) and the other was one of their simplest designs (”The Cinderella”). Why put a sink in the corner of a dressing room or a closet? Running the necessary plumbing, drain lines and vent would have added some expense, so what’s the point?

There were a few obvious reasons: It gave the lady of the house a place to wash her “unmentionables” and it also gave the man a place to shave when the couple’s seven kids were hogging the bathroom.

But there might have been another lesser-known reason.

Are those kids gone? ;)

In the early 1900s, male prophylactics were “re-usable.” It wasn’t until the 1920s that latex was invented, and these particular items became single-use.

By the way, this particular insight as to the purpose of that master-bedroom sink is not my own, but was sent to me by a faithful reader of the blog. Best of all, it makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it? I’d love to give proper credit to the reader who shared this info with me, but I can’t remember who it was! Argh!

To learn more about The Cinderella, click here.

There are only nine known Magnolias in the country. You can read more here.

*

house 1921

The Cinderella was a very modest house and apparently, they didn't sell too many of these. It was priced at $1,500 and yet only had a single bedroom. The dressing room was located off the living room.

*

Cindy 1921

Close-up of the floorplan shows a sink in the dressing room.

*

Cindy

Roll-away beds were heavily promoted for use in the Cinderella. Here, you can see the lady of the house has used the dressing room sink for washing out her delicate undergarments.

*

DuMont

The DuMont was a pattern-book house offered in the 1920s. It also featured a sink in a closet.

*

Dumont

Close-up of the sink in the DuMont off the master-bedroom.

*

Sears Maggy 1921

Sears biggest and best house (The Magnolia) also had a sink in the closet.

*

South bend

The Sears Magnolia in South Bend, Indiana has the original built-in cabinets, and an original closet sink, together with original faucets. Quite a find, and a testament to the quality of the materials.

*

South Bend

Close-up of the sink in the South Bend Magnolia. It also has its original medicine chest and light fixture. This picture is almost two years old. I hope the new owner does an honest restoration of the old house. In all my travels, I've never seen a three-sided sink like this.

*

West Virginia

The Magnolia in West Virginia also has its original cabinets in the closet, but the sink has been replaced. Interesting that the sink is placed right next to that window.

*

To learn more about The Cinderella, click here.

There are only nine known Magnolias in the country. You can read more here.

*        *      *

Gordon Van Tine #611: Unusually Well Planned

April 2nd, 2015 Sears Homes 3 comments

These last few months, I’ve been doing a proper survey of kit homes in Hampton, Virginia. I went out yesterday to check one last section one last time (which I’ve now visited twice), when this handsome bungalow jumped out of the bushes and called my name.

This Gordon Van Tine Model #611 is on a main drag (300-block of North Mallory) which leaves me scratching my head. How did I miss it?

That will remain one of the great mysteries of the universe, together with, where did I put my husband’s truck keys.

To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

*

Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

Gordon Van Tine #611, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

*

One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

One of its distinctive features is the oversized porch and deck.

*

What a house!

Notice how the porch roof sits within the primary roof. Interesting feature.

*

Oh yeah, baby! :D

Sadly, some vinyl siding salesman has pillaged the house, but other than that, it's a nice match. The railings have been replaced, but that's a relatively minor affair.

*

Good match on this side, too!

Good match on this side, too!

*

So

And did I mention it's on the main drag? :)

*

To read more about the kit homes of Hampton, click here.

There’s even more about Hampton here.

*   *   *

“The Charm of the True Colonial is Perennial”

January 5th, 2015 Sears Homes 1 comment

Throughout my time on this earth, I’ve always had a soft spot for a center-hallway Colonial. Perhaps this is because I lived in one from July 1959 (birth of a seven-pound old house zealot) to April 1978 (zealot leaves to get married).

In 2007 when I got married again (and for the last time, I might add), I moved into another center-hallway Colonial, reminiscent of my childhood home. Not only did it remind me of the family home in Waterview (Portsmouth, VA), but it looked like a good place to drop both anchor and money.

Gordon Van Tine offered a Colonial, known as “Modern Home #601″ and later named “The Shoreham.”

Even today, sitting in my perfect Mid-Century Modern brick ranch, I still swoon when I gaze upon the pictures of these early 20th Century Colonials. The copy writers for GVT were right: Its charm is perennial.

To read more about Gordon Van Tine, click here.

Interested in reading about the plan-book houses of Waterview? Click here.

Hey - are you familiar with Bluefield, WV? If so, I’m missing a couple houses there. Please leave a comment below if you know the area?

*

house

GVT Home #601, as seen in the 1926 catalog.

*

Okay, I know youre just here for the pictures, but take a moment and actually *read* this text. Its a great read!!

I know you're just here for the pictures, but take a moment and actually *read* this text. It's worth it. The Colonial has survived "The horrors of the Mansard era and the Victorian period..."

*

houe

In 1929, it became known as The Shoreham (as in, are you shore this is ham?). The dormers went bye-bye, too.

*

Floorplan

Busy little floorplan. I love the coat closet's placement.

*

Floopr

My oh my, but there's a lot going on in the kitchen.

*

fefe

GVT #601 (1926 catalog).

*

Bluefield WV

My friend Ersela and I discovered this house in Bluefield, WV. It's a real dandy, isn't it?

*

515 Nanse

My childhood home at 515 Nansemond Street, as photographed by my father on moving day, April 1957.

*

Gosnold Avenue

Our beautiful former home on Gosnold Avenue in Colonial Place. I had made a plan with my friend David Strickland to custom-build cut-out functional shutters for the home's front. I was going to paint them black, but life took a few turns and we ended up selling the home and moving to another part of Norfolk. I've always thought this house was one of the prettiest homes in Colonial Place (Norfolk).

*

The house

The GVT #601 (the Colonial shown at the top of the page) sat next door to a GVT #603 (this house). I'm sorry to say I don't know which street it was on, but I'd love to find out - and maybe even get a photo. These houses were close to the river (parallel to the river) and on a main drag. Do you know where they are? :/

*

To read more about Gordon Van Tine, click here.

Interested in reading about the plan-book houses of Waterview? Click here.

*      *       *