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Posts Tagged ‘Teddy the wonder dog’

My Sweet Teddy

December 16th, 2016 Sears Homes 9 comments

Dear little Teddy got into something that caused her to vomit within 1-2 hours, and then she recovered. This happened several times over a span of several months, and yet after each “event,” she seemed okay a few hours later. I’m now wondering if she ingested something toxic.

I’d also be grateful to know what might cause such a reaction in a Sheltie. Could it be mushrooms? Antifreeze? What would cause such an event?

She’s been to the vet several times since then and is in excellent health now. Any ideas what could make a 45-pound Sheltie so sick so fast?

Thanks.

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Her good health is my best Christmas present.

Her good health is my best Christmas present.

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Teddy as a little puppy.

Teddy as a little puppy (early 2009).

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The Wabash: A Dog’s Eye View

August 8th, 2015 Sears Homes No comments

Teddy the Dog noticed a couple things about the Sears Wabash (in yesterday’s blog) that I had missed.

1) The 1920 version had “chains” on the front porch (something a dog is always cognizant of);

2) The Wabash didn’t offer indoor plumbing (something a dog well understands).

So Teddy asked me to clarify these two important points on this blog.

To read more about Teddy, click here.

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Teddy asked me to do this subsequent blog.

Being a Sheltie, she's a herding dog, and has an especially keen eye for detail.

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The Wabash was first offered in 1916 and was apparently a popular house. The price tag was under $600, which - even factoring in average costs in 1916 - was a sound value. Heres a Wabash in Alliance, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

The Wabash was first offered in 1916 and was apparently a popular house. The price tag was under $600, which - even factoring in average costs in 1916 - was a sound value. Here's a Wabash in Alliance, Ohio. Photo is copyright 2015 Robb Hyde and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The

Even the "Already Cut" version of this house was a mere $599 (1916).

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But when Teddy got to comparing the floorplan with the

But when Teddy got to comparing the floorplan with the "interior view" of the kitchen, she noticed something wasn't quite right. She was puzzled, as was I.

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Its not a match

We both stared at this image a few minutes, trying to orient ourselves. How can this room have three exterior openings? It's on the corner of the house.

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House

Teddy put herself in the Wabash to re-create the view shown above.

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Thats when Teddy realized we had to rotate the image 90 degrees.

The view is easier to grasp when the image is rotated 90 degrees. The "interior view" can only be seen by a Sheltie with x-ray vision and the ability to look through walls. As shown here, Teddy would need to stand on the edge of the fireplace mantel, and look through an interior wall.

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Teddy suggested I put the images side-by-side. The floorplan shows a window next to the door (upper right), but the image (left side) shows just a door. The exterior view of the Wabash shows only one window in that spot. Seems like a tricky bunch of photos, doesn't it? Maybe the architects were wondering if anyone would notice if they mixed it up a bit. Or maybe those architects just made a boo-boo.

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The view of the living room is simpler: Youre standing at the front door, looking down that 19 expanse.

The view of the living room is simpler: You're standing at the front door, looking down that 19' expanse. I do not understand why there's only a cased opening going into that bedroom (front left).

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If you look again at the floorplan,

If you look again at the floorplan, you'll see that the screened porch has a cement floor, and opens up off the kitchen. That explains how the kitchen has three exterior openings: One of them goes to the porch.

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The image from the 1920 catalog shows that theres a chain on the front porch.

The image from the 1920 catalog shows that there's a chain on the front porch. As my friend Dale would say, "That's really cheapin' it out." Teddy wants to go on record as saying that "chains" and "dogs" are a very bad mix and she thinks that those two words should never be in the same sentence.

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You may have noticed that the Wabash does not have a bathroom. In fact, if you look closely, theres only one spigot on the kitchen sink, suggesting that it was cold water only.

You may have noticed that the Wabash does not have a bathroom. In fact, if you look closely, there's only one spigot on the kitchen sink, suggesting that it was cold water only. The cost of the Wabash would include an additional $41, for this "neat, attractive, little building." Teddy has a better understanding than most of the need to go outside - slogging through the muck and the snow - just to go tinkle.

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Fefe

This is disturbing. But what's even more unnerving is the third paragraph.

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Its reminiscent of the image on the cover of the 1908 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

It's reminiscent of the image on the cover of the 1908 Sears Modern Homes catalog. What's this fellow doing? He's exiting his shiny new Sears Modern Home to go to the outside pump and fetch a couple pails of water. His trusty Sheltie is right by his side.

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In closing, Teddy just wanted to say that she feels strongly

In closing, Teddy just wanted to say that she likes the Wabash and sees many good places for a Sheltie to lounge and enjoy life. In our own home, Teddy has a strong presence in the bedrooms, the sunporch, the living room and the dining room. She also enjoys hanging out in the bathroom (only when it's occupied) and in front of the fireplace. Her personal favorite spot is the kitchen, where there are many opportunities for her to get underfoot, and catch errant bits of food that hit the floor during meal preparation. Despite its hazards, she also likes to lay lengthwise in the narrow long hallway of our brick ranch at 3:00 in the morning, so that anyone headed to the bathroom will trip over her. I'm not sure why she does that...

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My name is Teddy, and I approve this blog.

My name is Teddy, and I approve this blog.

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To read more about Teddy, click here.

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Teddy: Watchdog Extraordinaire

December 30th, 2014 Sears Homes 4 comments

One of my all-time favorite books is, “Kinship with All Life” (by J. Allen Boone).  It’s a short but delightful read, and the book’s premise is this; dogs are a whole lot smarter (and more intuitive) than we humans can understand.

Several years ago, when Teddy was less than two years old, she came to my bedside one night and demanded that I awaken and arise.

I opened my eyes and saw my favorite quadruped standing there with an intense gaze in her eyes.

With as much gravitas as a Sheltie can muster, she lifted her snout ever so slightly and said, “Woof!”

As any dog owner knows, a dog has different barks for different occasions. This “woof” was different from the others.

I looked into her eyes for a minute and said, “What?”

She looked at me as if to say, “Listen, you need to get up and take a look outside. It’s important.”

She stood still and continued to stare intensely at me.

I arose from my soft pink bed and looked outside, and that’s when I saw two miscreants studying my car, parked in front of the house. One was especially interested in the license plate. The other was leaning over and looking in the driver’s window.

The dog stood beside me and barked incessantly. I was trying to figure out if I should holler or call 911, but Teddy’s barking was enough. They immediately stood up and briskly walked away.

Once the drama ceased, I praised Teddy. And I wondered, “How did she know? And how did she know how to get my attention with that little staring maneuver? How could she hear those muted malefactors, preparing to do heaven-knows-what to my slightly used 2003 Camry?”

Teddy just turned seven years old last month, and I recognize with some sadness that her life is half over.

For the first 30  years of my life, I didn’t like dogs. I was a cat person, through and through. When I was 36 years old, I got my first dog. When my mother met “Daisy,” for the first time, she fell in love with her. My mother told me, “I’m glad that you have discovered what a joy it is to have the love of a dog. There’s nothing like it.”

Mom was right.

PS. One of my most-popular blogs of all time (8,000 views) was this story about Teddy, but the link (from 2010) is now a “dead link.” Not sure how that happened, and this post was an attempt to repair the broken link - unsuccessfully! My apologies if you’ve heard this story before.

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Roxy (black fuzzy lumpkin) is Teddys best friend, and sometimes, they have a sleepover.

Roxy (black fuzzy cutie-pie) is Teddy's best friend, and sometimes, they have a sleepover. At first glance, you might think this is a human bed, but you'd be mistaken. It's a dog bed that humans are permitted to use.

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Teddy has also mastered the art of relaxation.

Teddy has also mastered the art of relaxation.

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Teddy also enjoys looking for kit homes in her spare time.

Teddy also enjoys looking for kit homes in her spare time.

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This is one of my favorite photos of Teddy. She loves taking me for walks.

This is one of my favorite photos of Teddy. She loves taking me for walks.

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To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

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And So This is Christmas…

December 24th, 2014 Sears Homes 3 comments

Thanks so much to Rachel Shoemaker for providing me with the PERFECT Christmas Day photo!

And if you want to read about Sears Homes all year long, join our group of kit-home enthusiasts on Facebook!

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Rach

Rachel Shoemaker's favorite elf studies not one, but two catalogs whilst gazing upon a diminutive version of the Sears Mitchell - decorated for Christmas! Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Teddy

Teddy will look back on this Christmas with many fond memories.

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Visit Rachel’s blog by clicking here.

Interested in learning about Gordon Van Tine? Click here!

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I’m Sorry, But Your Dog May Have to be Euthanized…

August 22nd, 2012 Sears Homes 4 comments

It was about 10:30 on Wednesday night (June 27th) when I heard those words from the Animal Control officer.

It was shocking news, to say the least.

Our dog was “Teddy,” a four-year-old Sheltie, and a much-loved pet.

The trouble started when Teddy tangled with a raccoon.

About 9:45 on Wednesday night, we’d put Teddy out in our fenced back yard for her last potty break. Typically she runs to her favorite corner, takes care of business, and then returns quickly to the door, ready for bed.

This time, she did not return quickly to the back door. We found her fixated on something, and barking incessantly.

When we went outside to investigate, we found that Teddy was barking at a sickly, blood-soaked raccoon, curled up against the chain-link fence in a corner of our yard.

The wretched animal had been in a brutal fight, and had a limb nearly severed from its body.

The animal’s sufferings were great. I called animal control, thinking that they’d show up quickly and euthanize this poor creature.

Twenty minutes later, their familiar blue and white truck arrived. By now, this raccoon had stumbled over to the shed in our backyard (about 30 feet away) and collapsed.

Using the “Noose On a Stick,” the animal control officer placed the now-unconscious raccoon into a cat carrier.

The animal control officer informed us that if the raccoon tested positive for rabies, our beloved Teddy would have to be euthanized.

Standing out there in the dark, with hubby Wayne at my side, I felt my heart sink to my knees.

I produced a rabies certificate, and explained that Teddy was current on all vaccinations. The animal control officer said it didn’t matter, and she re-stated that Teddy must be euthanized immediately if the raccoon tested positive.

Teddy has a massive white mane. The raccoon was soaked in blood. If Teddy had had any physical contact, she’d have blood on her mane. There was not one drop.

The animal control officer said that the raccoon may have hissed and spit - literally - in Teddy’s eyes, and since the saliva carries the live virus, that could “expose” Teddy to rabies.

It was a long night for me, Wayne and Teddy.

I stayed up all night, alternately crying, praying and hugging my little Sheltie. I was beside myself.

Thursday morning, I was standing at our vet’s office (”Dog and Cat Hospital“) when they opened the doors at 7:45 am.

The receptionist listened to my story and said, “Oh good grief, someone has made a mistake. Teddy’s current on her shots. Now if she was NOT current, that’d be a different matter.”

I started to tear up, from sheer relief.

Teddy and I were ushered into an exam room pretty quickly. When the veterinarian appeared, she calmly repeated what the receptionist told us.

“Teddy’s current on her rabies shots. We’ll give her a booster right now, but I’m sure she’ll be fine.”

She also explained to me that, worse-case scenario, if the raccoon tested positive for rabies, Teddy would be quarantined for 45 days, but that it would almost certainly be an “in-home quarantine.”

The veterinarian then examined Teddy from head to toe, and found no evidence of bites or scratches or contact. I told her that when we’d found Teddy and the raccoon, Teddy was excitedly barking, and running to and fro.

The vet put gently placed her hands on either side of Teddy’s head and went nose to nose with my little dog.

Speaking softly, she said, “You were just doing your job, weren’t you? You were trying to let them know that there was an intruder in the yard.”

The vet then looked up at me and said, “A sheltie will dance around and bark a lot, but they wouldn’t get close enough to a raccoon to bite or get bitten.”

The vet affirmed that the animal control officer’s information was incorrect, and she then offered to call the health department on my behalf. About two hours later, someone from the Health Department contacted me and was profoundly apologetic.

The official was humble and sincere. She told me that the veterinarian was correct.

Since Teddy was current on all her shots, state law would require - at most - a 45-day in-home quarantine. That was the worst-case scenario.

I could live with that.

And that was if the raccoon tested positive for rabies.

Friday afternoon, about 48 hours after all the brouhaha began, the health department contacted us and said that the raccoon had tested positive for rabies.

There’d be three visits from the Health Department during the 45-day period. The first would explain the rules of the quarantine and inspect our backyard. The official would also give the dog a cursory inspection. The second visit from the health department would be about mid-way through, and during the third visit, they’d examine the dog one last time and release us from the quarantine.

We were given informational pamphlets which explained the quarantine and what to watch out for.

Because of the quarantine, we canceled our big party on July 4th. We canceled an out-of-town trip. There were some other adjustments to be made. Teddy could not be left in the backyard unless we were home, keeping an eye on her. When it was dark outside (early morning/late evening), we went out with her.

It was a hassle, but we didn’t mind. We love our dog. For Christmas, Santa brought Teddy a doggy bed from L. L. Bean with her name embroidered on it. Even Teddy’s toy box is monogrammed.

We don’t have little children in our home. We have a dog. And we love her.

A lot.

Through this experience, I learned some very important things about rabies: Things that every pet owner should know.

1)  Most importantly, your dog/cat should be kept current on their rabies vaccination.

If Teddy was not current on her rabies vaccine, she’d now be dead.

In the Commonwealth of Virginia, an exposure to rabies (such as occurred with Teddy and the raccoon) is enough to require that the pet be seized and destroyed immediately.

Did you know that?

I did not.

2)  An “encounter” (such as Teddy had) is enough to require the animal’s destruction.

Think about that.

And if the pet is bitten or scratched (and is not current on its vaccination), it must be destroyed. That’s the law, and given what I now know about rabies, it’s a sensible law.

3)  Rabies is one of a very few diseases that can be transmitted from animals to people. And despite all our 21st Century medical innovations, there is no cure for rabies.

By the time symptoms manifest in a human, it’s over. That’s why the state laws are so stringent. There are only three known cases of a human being surviving rabies (sans immediate treatment).

4) Treatment for rabies isn’t really treatment, in the traditional sense of the word.

After you’ve been exposed to rabies, you’ll need to have a series of shots as soon as possible after the exposure. According to the CDC, the “postexposure prophylaxis consists of a regimen of one dose of immune globulin and four doses of rabies vaccine over a 14-day period.

I’m the kid who skipped biology class in high school, but as I understand it, if you’re exposed to the rabies virus (which is transmitted through saliva), you’re then vaccinated for rabies. In short, your body’s immune system builds up an immunity and outruns the rabies virus, and you’re then protected from the disease. That’s why it’s so important to get treatment as fast as possible.

By the time that symptoms appear, it’s too late.

5) There is no way to test humans or animals for rabies.

Well, let me restate that. There is a way. Only one way. The animal is decapitated and its head is sent to the state health department (in our case, Richmond). Medical staff check the animal’s brain for the presence of the rabies virus.

Nasty bit of business.

Short of decapitation, there is no way to test humans or animals for the presence of the rabies virus.

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Our 45-day in-home quarantine is now over and Teddy and I are mighty relieved.

Yes, she’s “just a dog,” but she is dearly loved.
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After the rabies incident, Teddy asked for a good book on the efficacy of the vaccine. Teddys favorite auntie (Sandi Daniels) sent this book along to Teddy for some light bedtime reading.

After the rabies incident, Teddy asked for a good book on the efficacy of the vaccine. Teddy's favorite auntie (Sandi Daniels) sent this book along to Teddy for some light bedtime reading.

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The city put out a press release on our rabid raccoon incident and distributed this pamphlet to our neighbors homes. Ick.

The city put out a press release on our "rabid raccoon" incident and distributed this pamphlet to our neighbors' homes. Ick.

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As my friend Sandi said, Raccoons are little rabies factories. Raccoons are no longer on my good list.

As my friend Sandi said, "Raccoons are little rabies factories."

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Teddy

Here's a photographic re-creation of the event. "Hello Kitty" is playing the part of the rabid raccoon. Fortunately for "Hello Kitty," she will not be decapitated and have her head sent to Richmond, which was the fate of the raccoon. The raccoon wasn't nearly this cute. In fact, it looked like something from a horror flick.

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Soon after its encounter with Teddy, the raccoon stumbled over to the shed and collapsed.

Soon after its encounter with Teddy, the raccoon stumbled over to the shed and collapsed. Due to the inherent limitations in Hello Kitty's physiology, she can't quite replicate the position of the now-deceased raccoon.

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Like any good southern lady, Teddy uses a broad-rimmed hat to preserve her flawless complexion.

Happier days for Teddy. Here, she's showing off her new hat.

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To read more about Teddy, click here.

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Teddy, the Amazing Watch Dog!

October 7th, 2011 Sears Homes 3 comments

It was about 11:45 pm on a Thursday night when Teddy walked over to my side of the bed, stuck her snout next to mine, and gave me one loud “Woof.”

I opened my eyes and said, “What?” (as if she would answer). With an unmistakable intensity, she looked me right in the eye and repeated herself:  “Woof!”

Usually when there’s another dog outside, she’ll bark a bit and then settle down. If there’s someone walking down the city sidewalk, she’ll bark a little and then stop. But this was different.

I looked into her eyes for a minute and I swear I heard her say, “Listen, you need to get out of that bed and look outside. This isn’t just a random ‘woof’. This one’s important.”

She did not leave her station at the side of my bed but continued to stare intensely at me. I arose from my soft pink bed and toddled outside to the second-floor balcony just outside my bedroom. I looked outside and saw two highly questionable people studying my car, which was parked on the street. One was especially interested in the license plate. The other was leaning over and looking in the driver’s window.

The dog followed me out to the balcony and stood out there and barked. I was trying to figure out if I should yell or call 911, but Teddy’s barking was enough. They immediately stood upright and walked away.

Back in the bedroom, I thanked Teddy and gave her some praise. As I settled back under the covers, I said a little prayer of gratitude for her perspicacity. And I wondered, “How did she know? And how did she know how to get my attention with that little staring maneuver? How could she hear those silent people out there, preparing to mess with my red Camry?”

One of my favorite books is Kinship with All Life and its premise is that dogs are a lot smarter and a lot more intuitive and a lot more attuned to feelings and emotions that we humans can ever understand or appreciate.

The morning after the incident with the miscreants, I praised Teddy to the moon and stars. And that afternoon, she went outside and dug a hole in the middle of my freshly planted St. Augustine grass. Guess she didn’t want me to think she was the World’s Most Perfect Puppy.

This happened about two years ago, and we’ve since moved to another area, but Teddy still keeps a watchful eye over our property. These days, those “intruders” are mostly ducks and geese and racoons and muskrats - and the occasional snake.

She’ll be three years old this month, and she’s been a lot of fun in those three years. Best of all, I’ve never heard her voice one complaint about anything. She really is a good dog, a good companion and a trust-worthy friend.

To learn about the amazing collection of Sears Homes in Hampton Roads, click here.


Teddy the Dog watches over her Sheepie on a Saturday afternoon.

Teddy the Dog watches over her Sheepie on a Saturday afternoon.

Teddy looks regal.

Teddy re-enacts her "watchful pose" at a local park.

Cute puppy, but she was incredibly ill-behaved as a child. Fortunately, she grew up to be a good dog.

"Theodora Duncan Doughnuts Ringer" was a real cutie-pie, but she was incredibly ill-behaved as a child. Fortunately, she grew up to be a very good dog. She's shown here at about eight weeks old, being cuddled by her adoptive daddy.

In this remarkable photo of baby Teddy, she inadvertantly shows off her incredible

Teddy shows here that she not only knows how to "speak duck," but she is mimicking the duck's facial expressions as well.

Ted

Teddy the Amazing Watch Dog.

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A Portrait of Our House on Gosnold

July 27th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

Christmas 2007, my husband surprised me with a painting of our new home at 3916 Gosnold Avenue. It was one of the best gifts I ever received. The painting occupies a place of honor alongside our staircase wall. A couple weeks ago, a dear friend was looking at our home, as she knew someone who might be interested in purchasing it.  She saw the painting hanging on the wall and said, “Oh how beautiful! And now when you move out, you’ll always be able to take a little bit of your home with you.”

In addition to the painting (done by Kay Gillispie of Arbovale, WV), we’ve also been involved in the “Out and about Norfolk Plein Air Paint Out,” for the last three years, where local artists spend a day creating an artistic masterpiece of some Norfolk landmark. The second image came from such an event! It is an oil painting done by Gina Warren Buzby.

The third and fourth images were done by Morgan Sarah Ringer, and given to me as a gift. All four of these artistic works are among my favorite possessions on earth!

To learn more about our house, click here.

To see the pretty paintings, scroll on down!

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

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Kay Gillispie's beautiful artwork hangs on the staircase wall in our home. If you look closely, you'll see the little house in the back yard.

Close-up of the artwork done by Kay Gillispie

Close-up of the artwork done by Kay Gillispie

Oil painting of our backyard, done by Gina Buzby

Oil painting of our backyard, done by Gina Buzby

And another lovely piece done by Morgan Sarah Ringer!

And another lovely piece done by Morgan Sarah Ringer!

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Morgan's rendition of Teddy the Dog staring down the little house!

My favorite angle is the side, which shows off those quarter-round windows and new canvas awning.

And my favorite "view" of the house is from this angle, which shows off those quarter-round windows and new canvas awning.

To learn more about 3916 Gosnold Avenue, click here.

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Good Four-Legged Companions

February 15th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Yesterday was one of the prettiest days we’ve had in a long time, so Teddy and I wandered out to the campus at TCC (Suffolk) and took a nice long walk. Teddy helps me remember that sometimes, you need to stop what you’re doing and just take a long walk, and then sit in the sun for a time.

Teddy enjoys the blustery, beautiful day.

Teddy enjoys the blustery, beautiful day.

Teddy looks regal.

Teddy looks regal.

Teddy

Teddy is not worried about her hair getting mussed.

Teddy asks if were done with the pictures yet.

Teddy asks if we're done with the pictures yet.

No one can bask in the sun like Teddy the Dog.

No one can bask in the sun like Teddy the Dog.

Ive really grown weary of this sit-stay business. Time to Go!

"I've really grown weary of this sit-stay business. Time to Go!"

To learn more about Teddy, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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West Point, Virginia: Sears Homes - Yes, Military Academy - No.

September 26th, 2010 Sears Homes No comments

Recently I made the 90-minute drive to West Point, Virginia, looking for Sears Homes. Thanks to Rebecca Hunter’s book, “Putting Sears Homes on the Map,” I knew there were at least four Sears Homes in West Point. Her book is a compilation of testimonials from old Sears catalogs, organized by city and state.

Her book listed one testimonial in Norfolk, Virginia and yet I’ve found more than 50 Sears Homes here in Norfolk. “Putting Sears Homes on the Map” listed four Sears Homes in West Point. Proportionately speaking, that meant there should be at least 200 Sears Homes in the tiny town!

I’m saddened to report that I couldn’t even find the four that were listed. Her book listed the Whitehall, the Greenview, the Ivanhoe and the Avoca. I found the Ivanhoe, but couldn’t get close enough to take a photo. It sat on a supersized lot, bordering the water. Unfortunately, it faced the water, making it especially difficult to get a photo! However, I did find (and photograph) the Avoca.

An aside:  Despite the fact that I’ve lived in the Hampton Roads area for more than three decades, I didn’t realize that Virginia was not home to the famous Military Academy of West Point! Only recently did I learn that it’s in New York. Who knew? Not me, obviously.

So, where’s the Whitehall and the Greenview? More than likely, the Whitehall has been torn down. I went up and down those streets in West Point many times and if there was a Whitehall to be found, I would have seen it. The Greenview was such a simple little house that it could have been remodeled beyond recognition. Below are catalog images of these two houses. If you find them in West Point, drop me a note.

Here are the Sears Homes that I found in West Point, Virginia.

To read more about Sears Homes, click here.

Sears Avoca has seen in the 1916 Sears Modern Homes catalog

Sears Avoca has seen in the 1916 Sears Modern Homes catalog

Sears Crescent

Sears Avoca in West Point.

Sears Crescent from the 1921 Sears Modern Homes catalog

Sears Crescent from the 1921 Sears Modern Homes catalog

Sears Crescent

Perfect Sears Crescent in West Point. This is in wonderfully original condition!

Sears Cranmore

Sears Cranmore. Kind of a crummy picture, but it was surrounded by trees and bushes and more trees and more bushes. Nonetheless, I am confident that this is a Sears Cranmore.

The Sears Homes of West Point probably rode into town on these very railroad tracks!

The Sears Homes of West Point probably rode into town on these very railroad tracks!

Sears Greenview from the Sears Modern Homes catalog. We know one of these was built in West Point, but where?

Sears Greenview from the Sears Modern Homes catalog. We know one of these was built in West Point, but where?

Sears Whitehall. We know there was a Sears Whitehall built in West Point, but I suspect its been torn down.

Sears Whitehall. We know there was a Sears Whitehall built in West Point, but I suspect it's been torn down.

Sears Ivanhoe from the 1919 Modern Homes catalog

Sears Ivanhoe from the 1920 Modern Homes catalog. There's one of these on the waterfront of West Point, but no one was home at the house. I'd love to get a photo!

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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