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Posts Tagged ‘the prefab houses’

The Sears Homes in Raleigh: A Big Event!

May 8th, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

Next Saturday (May 19th) , I’ll be giving a talk on Sears Homes in Raleigh. To my astonishment and delight, we’ve found an impressive number of kit homes in this part of North Carolina, including Sears, Harris Brothers, Lewis Homes, Montgomery Ward, Gordon Van Tine and more!

To see more photos of those houses, click here.

At the talk, I’ll be giving a PowerPoint presentation that contrasts and compares the extant Sears Homes with the archival images. It’s a whole lot of fun, and I promise, a good time will be had by all!

Wow, Id LOVE to hear this woman talk...

Wow, I'd LOVE to hear this talk! Oh wait, I will hear it. ;)

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The details.

The details.

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The Sears Crescent in 1928.

The Sears Crescent in 1928.

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The Sears Crescent in Raleigh! What a nobby house!

The Sears Crescent in Raleigh! What a nobby house!

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Come join the fun as we re-enact the loading of 12,000 pieces of kit home into a vinate 1924 boxcar. Bring your own leather gloves!

Come join the fun as we re-enact the loading of 12,000 pieces of kit home into a vintage 1924 boxcar. Bring your own leather gloves! (This activity is not recommended for those with pre-existing heart conditions and/or recent gallbladder surgery and/or chronic back pain and/or siderodromophobia. You must be at least 4'10" tall to participate, and be able to easily hoist 125-pound bundles of lumber. Prior to the boxcar event, you'll be required to watch a 17-minute video titled, "Lumber Loading, Liability, Litigation and You." All persons participating will be required to sign a 48-page waiver before being allowed to join the fun. Images shown above are stock photos and not necessarily representational of the specific event.

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The history of the Sears Modern Homes in our country is a fascinating piece of our American culture. Dont miss the talk on Saturday!

The story of Sears Homes is a fascinating chapter of our American history. Do you live in a Sears House? Come to our talk on Saturday and you'll learn HOW to identify kit homes!

To read more about the kit homes of Raleigh, click here.

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Ok, I made it all up about loading the boxcar. We’re not really loading any boxcars.

But it does sound like fun, doesn’t it?

And did you figure out what siderodromophobia means?

See you on Saturday (May 19th).

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The Sears Sadstone

May 3rd, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

In 2002, when I wrote The Houses That Sears Built, I lived in Alton, Illinois. Many, many times I drove past this house on the main drag, never really paying attention to it. It was probably a year after I’d written my book that I happened to notice this badly blighted house was a Sears Gladstone.

For a time, I wondered if I should even bother putting it on my “list” as a Sears House. It was such poor condition that its original beauty was hardly discernible. Would this help or hinder my cause of promoting Sears Homes in Southwestern Illinois?

Ultimately, I did add it to my list. A short time later, the house  (and its glommed-on addition) was demolished.

To learn more about Sears Homes in Illinois, click here.

To learn more about Rebecca Hunter’s newest book, click here.

Nice house

Several times, I tried to get a photo of the house sans trash pile, but it seemed to be one of those houses that *always* had trash piled up in front.

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If you look closely at the second floor, you can see where the double windows were removed and replaced with storm windows. Nice tough.

If you look closely at the second floor, you can see where the double windows were removed and replaced with storm windows. Double icky.

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The Sears Gladstone was actually a very popular house (1916 catalog).

The Sears Gladstone was actually a very popular house (1916 catalog).

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By todays standards, it wasnt very spacious but in the early 1900s, this was considered an average

By today's standards, the Gladstone (an American Foursquare) wasn't very spacious but in the early 1900s, this was considered an average-sized home.

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As seen in the 1916 Modern Homes catalog.

As seen in the 1916 Modern Homes catalog.

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And heres a fine Gladstone in West Virginia.

And here's a fine Gladstone in West Virginia. This house can bee seen from I-64, and it's located about 30 minutes east of Charleston, WV. I always wave at it when I go by.

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Pretty cool, huh?  :)

Pretty cool, huh? :)

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To read more about Sears Homes (and see more photos), click here.