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Posts Tagged ‘thomas hoyt fuller’

Waterview (Portsmouth, Virginia) and Their Plan Book Houses

October 20th, 2015 Sears Homes 4 comments

An old friend (Margee) contacted me and said that her daughter had recently purchased a home in Waterview, our old stomping ground. Margee and I grew up together on Nansemond Street in Waterview, and we share many happy memories of that place and time.

Margee was wondering if the house was a kit home.

Here’s the answer.  :)

Margees daughter purchased this house in Waterview.

Margee's daughter purchased this 1930s house in Waterview. Like so many Waterview homes, it's a 1920s/30s two-story home with brick veneer and a Buckingham slate roof - the crème de la crème of all slate roofs. These homes are very well built and solid, and with minimal care and some love, this house will last another 100 years.

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Here's a view of the house as seen on Google.

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And heres a view of the house as seen in the 1927 Homebuilders Catalog.

And here's a view of the house as seen in the 1927 Home Builder's Catalog. Margee's daughter does *NOT* have a kit home, but it is a "Pattern Book" house. Pattern book homes were NOT the same as kit homes, but they were similar.

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With pattern book homes (such as "Home Builders" shown here), you'd select the house of your dreams and then you'd receive detailed blueprints and a list of the building materials you'd need for your new home. With kit homes, everything came in a one package - the design, blueprints and building materials.

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Brief review:

Kit house - everything in one package: Design, blueprints and building materials.

Pattern book house - design, blueprints and a LIST of the building materials you’d need to purchase to build your new home.

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Pattern book homes were hugely popular in the 1920s and 1930s (which is when the house in Waterview was built), and the 1927 book shown here had more than 1,000 pages.

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Many thanks to Google for getting the house from the same angle! The house in Waterview is brick, while the image from the pattern book is frame, and the side porch has been enclosed. Nonetheless, I'd say it's the same model.

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A little information on the front page tells more about the how-tos of buying a pattern book house.

A little information on the front page tells more about the "how-tos" of buying a pattern book house.

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Waterview is awash in pattern book houses, and Ive spent years trying to find the house of my youth (in Waterview) in a pattern book. Heretofore, Ive been unsuccessful.

Waterview is awash in pattern book houses, and I've spent years trying to find the house of my youth (in Waterview) in a pattern book. Heretofore, I've been unsuccessful.

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The older I get, the more I realize, Im an old soul lost in a love of all things historic, and thats ever more apparent when I reflect on memories of Margee, my childhood friend. When I think of Margee, this is where my mind travels.

Here's a picture of Margee and me in the late 1960s. That's my brother Tommy on the far left (guitar guy), and then me (sleepy girl), Margee, and my brother Eddie on the far right.

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To learn more about the amazing collection of pattern book homes in Waterview and nearby areas, click here.

Do  you think you have a kit home? Learn how to identify these early 20th Century treasures here.

Nostalgia buff? Read more about my own happy memories of Waterview here.

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Christmas at the Fargo Mansion

December 12th, 2012 Sears Homes 1 comment

It’s been about a year since I last stayed at the Fargo Mansion Inn in Lake Mills, Wisconsin but the many fond memories of that visit still remain. Many folks in that small, picturesque village showed me so many kindnesses. And two of the kindest, most sincere people I met during that trip were Tom Boycks and Barry Luce, owners of the Fargo Mansion Inn.

Were it not for these two, the 7,500-square foot Queen Anne mansion would have been reduced to several tons of construction debris at the county landfill. It was slated for demolition when they stepped in and bought it, sans heat, plumbing and electricity.

It’s been 25 years since those two saved this house, and today, it’s hard to imagine what Lake Mills would look like without this most impressive manse.

Since purchasing the solid-brick, 112-year-old house, Barry and Tom have poured their heart and soul (and a lot of money) into a thoughtful and thorough restoration. Visiting this house should be high on your “bucket list.” To make a reservation, click here.

The Fargo Mansion first came into my life in Summer 2011, shortly after my father’s death. Amongst his things, I found two old photo albums. One of the albums had an inscription: “Merry Christmas, Wilbur.”

Wilbur was my great-grandfather, but who was Addie Hoyt Fargo? Well, that’s a long story. To learn more about Addie Hoyt, click here.

To see pictures of Addie’s House, all dressed up for Christmas, scroll down!  (Thanks to Jan Vanderheiden for the photos!)

To read about Addie’s special Christmas present to Wilbur in 1900, click here.

To reserve a room at the Fargo Mansion (and see more gorgeous photos), click here.

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Addies house as it appeared in 1896, soon after a major remodeling.

Addie's house as it appeared in 1896, soon after a major remodeling.

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This beautiful house underwent a major remodeling in 1895 and 1896. Today, its a nationally known B&B. Addie would be proud!

This beautiful house underwent a major remodeling in 1895 and 1896. Today, it's a nationally known B&B. Addie would be proud! (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Inside, Tom and Barry have done a beautiful job of decorating the house for the holidays.

Inside, Tom and Barry have done a beautiful job of decorating the house for the holidays. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Addie also did a fine job of decorating, back in 1896.

Addie also did a fine job of decorating, back in 1896. This photo faces the same corner as the contemporary photo shown above. Sadly, that newel post light ("Our Lady of the Naked Light") disappeared in the intervening decades.

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Tom and Barry love this old house, and it really shows.

Tom and Barry love this old house, and it really shows. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Addie loved her house, too.

Addie loved her house, too. In the background, you can see that massive staircase and reception hall. Look at the fretwork and heavy curtains over the doorways.

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I love the vintage toys at the base of the tree. This tree sits at the base of the staircase. (Photos are copyright 2011 Jan Vanderheiden and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Notice the magnolia leaves on the Electrolier!

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When my father died in June 2011, I found this photo album buried in an old nightstand. Apparently Addie gave this to her brother-in-law Wilbur Whitmore for a Christmas gift.

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Heres a picture of Addie with her older sister, Anna. Anna (born 1866) married Wilbur and moved to Denver. Wilbur and Annas families were both from Lake Mills and theyre my great-grandparents.

Here's a picture of Addie with her older sister, Anna. Anna (born 1866) married Wilbur and moved to Denver. Wilbur and Anna's families were both from Lake Mills and they're my great-grandparents.

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Wilbur and Anna about the time of their engagement (late 1880s).

Wilbur and Anna about the time of their engagement (late 1880s).

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To learn more about the Hoyts, click here.

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One Year Ago Today…

June 10th, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

One year ago today (June 10th), I sat at my father’s bedside, held his 91-year-old hand in mine and told him, “I love you. I forgive you. And I release you.”

We were alone in that tiny room at the assisted living facility (my husband, my father and I), and yet we were in the company of “too many angels to count.”

It was a holy, spiritual moment that I will never forget.

As I said at his eulogy on June 20th, 2011, “my father came into this world surrounded by love, and 91 years later he stepped out of this world, again surrounded and embraced by love. It was a good ending.”

To read more about Thomas H. Fuller, click here.

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My father in 2003, in Portsmouth, Virginia.

My father in 2003, in Portsmouth, Virginia. He was 84 years old here.

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About 1977, shown with his twin brother, Ed.

About 1977, shown with his twin brother, Ed.

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My father shown here with his father, Edgar A. Fuller.

My father shown here with his father, Edgar A. Fuller. This picture was taken inside Edgar's home on 14th Street in Santa Monica (about 1977).

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Dog

Dad sits on the edge of Eddie's bed, trying not to upset the dog (about 1971).

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About 1964, my father

Mid-1960s, my father in Santa Monica, in front of his childhood home at 213 14th Street.

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My father loved California.

My father loved California. He's admiring the oranges in his parent's back yard.

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My father with this father.

My father with this father in 1966.

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Our family in 1966, enroute to California from Portsmouth, Virginia. My father purchased a new car for the trip, a 1957 Cadillac.

Our family in 1966, enroute to California from Portsmouth, Virginia. My father purchased a "new" car for the trip, a 1957 Cadillac. We made the 3,000-mile trek in seven days.

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About 1959

My father holding his newest offspring in Summer 1959. BTW, that's me in his lap and my brother Tom sitting beside us. The beautiful bed in the photo had been my father's bed since 1935. It was made in the 1890s and had been an Exhibition Piece at the 1894 World's Fair.

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Dad

My father was always very photogenic. I always had a very large forehead that caught the camera's glare (about 1960).

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Ed and Father, in 1956.

Ed and Father, in 1956. They lived in Shea Terrace (Portsmouth) at the time. Check out the 1953 Pontiac in the background.

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My father was a WW2 Army Veteran.

My father was a WW2 Army Veteran. This photo was the early 1940s.

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My father at age six.

My father at age six.

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In the mid-1990s, I visited my fathers home and a friend of his answered the door. As I stood on the stoop, she stared at me - slackjawed - and didnt move. Finally, I started to push past her while asking, Everything okay? She replied, I aint never seen a daughter who looked so much like her father.

In the mid-1990s, I visited my father's home and a friend of his answered the door. As I stood on the stoop, she stared at me - slackjawed - and didn't move. Finally, I started to push past her while asking, "Everything okay?" She replied, "I ain't never seen a daughter who looked so much like her father. You look just like him." A little disconcerting for a 30-something woman to be told she's the twin of her 70-something father. And yet, this photo of my father from 1922 really showcases that. This could have been a photo of me.

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Baby

My father and his twin brother in 1919. My grandmother captioned this photo with "Whenever Junior (right side) and Thomas (left) are together, Junior reaches out and takes Thomas' little hand." It was this photo that enabled me to forgive my father. Seeing his innate, God-given child-like innocence opened "the eyes of my eyes" and healed my heart.

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My father in 2007, at my wedding. He was 87 years old here. Photo is copyright Dave Chance and can not be used without written permission.

My father in 2007, at my wedding. He was 87 years old. Photo is copyright Dave Chance and can not be used without written permission.

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As I told my father in the last days of his life, he was not always part of my life, but I never stopped loving him.

And I never will.

To read more about “Innocence Rediscovered,” click here.

The Sears Homes of Suffolk (Virginia)

January 7th, 2012 Sears Homes No comments

One of my favorite memories from childhood was riding with my father to Suffolk to visit the peanut vendors and inspect their product. My father was an assistant manager at Skippy Peanut Butter in Portsmouth, and also their purchasing agent.

Suffolk has always been one of my favorite places in Virginia.  And it’s also the largest city in Virginia, and the Peanut Capital of the World. Here in Hampton Roads, it’s our fastest-growing city, thanks to the low-crime rates and above-average schools.

Perhaps best of all, it has a significant collection of kit homes.

Sears kit homes were sold from 1908-1940. Sears and Roebuck was based in Chicago, but Sears Homes were sold in all 48 states. These 12,000-piece kits were shipped by boxcar, and came with a 75-page instruction book and a promise that a “man of average abilities” could have the house built and ready for occupancy in 90 days.

Here in Southeastern Virginia, we also have many kit homes from Aladdin. They were based in Bay City, Michigan, but Aladdin had a large mill in Wilmington, NC. Aladdin started selling kit homes in 1906, and continued until 1981.

If I were queen of the world (and it shouldn’t be long now), I would create a simple pamphlet showing these kit homes and their addresses (and a map) and offer them to visitors as a self-guided driving tour. I’d also put a little plaque on the homes, identifying them as kit homes. This is a very nice collection of kit homes in Suffolk, and something should be done to promote them.

All of the houses shown below are located in Suffolk.

To learn more about identifying kit homes, click here.

To see a Sears Home in Urbana with a little plaque, click here.

Sears Osborn, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

Sears Osborn, as seen in the 1919 catalog.

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Sears

There are a lot of trees and bushes in Suffolk, which made it difficult to get good photographs. Here's a Sears Osborn in an older section of Suffolk. Note the details around the brickwork.

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Sears

The Sears Westly was a very popular house for Sears. This is from the 1916 catalog. The floorplan shows a fireplace in the corner of the dining room, which is an unusual feature in a Sears House!

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Close-up of the Sears Westly

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This Westly is happy, and feels very good about life. It's a good match to the original catalog image, and even though it's been "updated," the work was thoughtfully done.

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Putting wrought iron on an old house is not a good idea.

Putting wrought iron on an old house is not a good idea. Plus, they removed the porch deck. And the columns. And the eaves. And the unique trim. And the personality.

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The Glenn Falls was one of Sears biggest and fanciest homes.

The Glenn Falls was one of Sears biggest and fanciest homes.

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Crummy photo due to poor lighting, but you can it is a Glenn Falls.

Crummy photo due to poor lighting, but you can it is a Glenn Falls, in brick!

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Sears Elsmore was another very popular house for Sears.

Sears Elsmore was another very popular house for Sears.

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Its been through some changes, but its still an Elsmore.

It's been through some changes, but it's still an Elsmore. Note the nine/one windows, and also the original eave brackets. You can also see bits of those unique columns on the front porch.

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As mentioned, in addition to Sears, there as also a mail-order company called Aladdin. This is an Aladdin Colonial, which was Aladdins biggest and fanciest house.

As mentioned, in addition to Sears, there as also a mail-order company called Aladdin. This is an Aladdin Colonial, which was Aladdin's biggest and fanciest house.

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This is a real beauty, and its right there in Suffolk!

This is a real beauty, and it's right there in Suffolk!

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The Aladdin Lamberton, from the 1919 catalog.

The Aladdin Lamberton, from the 1919 catalog.

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Its been converted into a duplex, but its still a Lamberton.

It's been converted into a duplex, and remuddled a bit. Is this a Lamberton? I'd say - with 90% certainty - that it is. Because of the many changes, it's hard to be sure. Look at the front porch roof. That's still a spot-on match to the original catalog image.

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And theres also a Harris Brothers house in Suffolk. Harris Brothers was a small kit home company based in Chicago.

And there's also a Harris Brothers house in Suffolk. Harris Brothers was a small kit home company based in Chicago.

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Suffolk

Again - the trees. Sigh. However, you can see (even with a tree in the way) that this is a perfect match to the Harris Brother house (shown above).

Last is this house from Gordon Van Tine. They were based in Davenport, Iowa and there are several GVT houses here in Hampton Roads.

Last is this house from Gordon Van Tine. They were based in Davenport, Iowa and there are several GVT houses here in Hampton Roads.

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Its been through some changes, but its a GVT #501.

It's been through some changes, but it's still easy to see that it's a GVT #501.

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When youre trying to identify Sears Homes, you should look for this mark on the lumber.

When you're trying to identify Sears Homes, you should look for this mark on the lumber. This mark, together with a 75-page instruction book, helped the novice homebuilder put together these homes.

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Aladdin used a different marking system on their lumber, such as this.

Aladdin used a different marking system on their lumber, such as this.

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If you’d like to learn more about the kit homes in Hampton Roads, click here.

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Enoch Fargo Should Have Come with a Surgeon General’s Warning

December 22nd, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

Being married to Enoch was hard on a woman. To see just how hard it was, take a look at these photos below.

In fact, this guy should have come with a Surgeon General’s warning label.

Scroll on down to see photos of Enoch’s first two wives, in their youth, and a few years later.

These images are haunting. Being married to Enoch took a real toll on these women.

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It's hard to believe but this IS the same woman ( Enoch's first wife - Mary Rutherford Fargo) in both photos. She died at the age of 37 (allegedly from Typhoid), so in this picture on the right she can not be more than 37 years old. Poor Mary.

The

And here's a picture of Addie, in 1896 (on her wedding day), and a scant five years later. Life with Enoch took a toll on both wives, and according to Mary Wilson, being married to Enoch not only took away Addie's youth, vigor and beauty; it also took away her very life.

Addie

What does Addie's body language tell us here? I'd love to know.

Before Enoch, Addie was a beautiful, vibrant, strong woman.

Before Enoch, Addie was a beautiful, vibrant, strong woman. She was 24 years old when she married him; he was 46. Eleven months after her death, he remarried Martha Harbeck Hoyt, a woman that had been living in the Fargo Mansion prior to Addie's death.

Did Enoch murder his young wife, Addie Hoyt Fargo? According to Mary Wilson, he did. To learn more about that, click here.

We do know that Addie’s death certificate was falsified. And we now know that Addie did not - could NOT - have died from diphtheria.

This is a complicated, detailed story. Click on the above links to learn more about the proof we’ve found that establishes - Mary Wilson was right.

To learn more about the Fargo Mansion, click here.

Please leave a comment below.

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A Disrespectful Way to Treat a Young Woman’s Death

December 8th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Today, an article ran in the “Lake Mills Leader” (Lake Mills’ newspaper) which reads (and I quote), “Legend has it, Enoch knocked off Addie.”

If a young woman was murdered last week by her husband, would the newspaper editors present the story with such flippancy, and with such an utter lack of respect?

When will Addie Hoyt Fargo - the 29-year-old woman who was allegedly murdered by her 52-year-old husband, Enoch Fargo, be given a modicum of decency and respect by the press in her own home town?

Did Enoch murder my great Aunt? According to Mary Wilson, Enoch’s own granddaughter, Enoch killed Addie. Read more here. (”The History of Lake Mills, 1983, page 274.)

We do know that Addie did not die of diphtheria, as is stated on her death certificate. We do know that Addie’s death certificate was falsified and we do know those involved in the cover-up violated Wisconsin state law when they did not obtain the necessary burial permit. And we know that Addie’s obituary was fabricated. Which begs the question, what happened to Addie 110 years ago, that those present at her death felt they had to falsify documents and create this fantastic cover-up, all in an effort to hide the truth? What was the truth that they were hiding?

And now,  even 110 years after this 29-year-old woman died under a cloud of suspicious circumstances and events, the Lake Mills newspaper still thinks it’s acceptable to treat Addie’s death in a sophomoric, flippant, irreverent manner.

I wonder if they’d feel the same way if this was their relative?

Because Addie is my relative, and I deeply resent their flippancy.

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Enoch Fargo and his bride, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896.

Enoch Fargo and his young wife, Addie Hoyt Fargo. This is labeled as their wedding photo from 1896. Addie was 22 years younger than Enoch. According to Mary Wilson (Enoch's granddaughter), Enoch murdered Addie.

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Addie

Addie in 1894, about two years before she married Enoch Fargo of Lake Mills.

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Addie married Enoch Fargo.

Enoch James Fargo, who allegedly murdered his second wife. His granddaughter (Mary Wilson) speaks plainly in her book (The History of Lake Mills) when she says, "Enoch shot Addie!"

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December 7th, 1941: Two People Who Remembered

December 6th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

My mother was in her 70s when she told me - in detail - about her memories of World War II.

She said that her generation was called “The Lost Generation,” because they moved from adolescence to adulthood in one leap on December 7, 1941. She said they went from being fun-loving teenagers to battle-scarred, hardened, old people in a short span of time. Their “youth” was wholly bypassed, due to those hard, lean war years.

They were “kids” that watched as countless numbers of their high school classmates marched off to war, and came back dead or disabled.

They were “kids” that sacrificed food and clothing and simple joys for scrap drives, in the hopes that it would help with the war effort.

They were “kids” that worried and wondered if Hitler - who seemed unstoppable - would make his way across Europe and eventually conquer this nation, as well.

They were “kids” who proudly marched down to recruitment centers en masse on December 7th and 8th, sometimes waiting in line for hours to join the armed services. They were ready, even eager, to lay their life on the line, so that this country’s way of life would be protected, and they were true American heroes.

And that’s the real story of December 7th, and the reason we - as Americans - should always remember and honor this day, because of the young Americans that were ready and willing to sacrifice their lives. Theirs was the most unselfish of acts, and that’s what we should remember and commemorate.

Both my mother and father were two of those “kids” who signed up to serve in the fight against Hitler and Hirohito. My father was 22 and my mother was 21 years old.

It’s because of them, and people like them, that we’ve had more than six decades of peace in America.

Mom was a lieutenant in the Waves, and worked in Oakland.

Mom was a lieutenant in the Waves, and worked in Oakland.

My father was a private in the Army. He served an an MP in France.

My father was a private in the Army. He served an an MP in France.

They were married in 1947, and their youngest child (thatd be me) was born on the fourth of July! They were a very patriotic couple!

They were married on June 23, 1947, and had four children. Their youngest child (that'd be me) was born on the fourth of July. They were a very patriotic couple!

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Who is Addie to Me?

November 29th, 2011 Sears Homes 8 comments

One of the questions I’m most frequently asked is, “How are you related to Addie?”

When I gave my talk in Lake Mills on September 4th, I explained that I didn’t even know I had an Aunt Addie until my father died in June 2011. While I was cleaning out his apartment, I found two photo albums in beautiful condition from the late 1890s. One photo was marked with this inscription:  Enoch and Addie Hoyt Fargo on their wedding day, 1896.

After the dust settled from my father’s funeral, I sent an email to my friend David Spriggs and asked for his help in solving this mystery. Within a few hours, he’d figured it out.

So, how am I related to Addie?

My great-great grandfather was Homer Hoyt, born in Vermont in 1841. In the early 1860s, he moved to Lake Mills, and met the woman who’d become my great-great grandmother, Julia Hawley Hoyt.  (Julia Hawley Hoyt was the daughter of a salty old sea dog, Captain Hawley.)

In my genetic history, we have an amazingly strong trait known by some as the “pack rat” trait. And while I’m personally a big fan of the anti-clutter club, I have to say, I’m very grateful that for 150 years, my family has been hanging onto these photos.

First, my favorite photo.

Captain Hezekiah Beech Hawley in 1874. According to family lore, he was a salty sea captain, and he surely does look the part. This would have been Addies grandfather!

Addie's maternal grandfather: Captain Hezekiah Beech Hawley in 1874. According to family lore, he was a salty sea captain, and he surely does look the part.

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And his wife, Teresa Hathaway Hawley (also 1874). This would have been Addies grandmother on her mothers side.

And here's a picture of the captain's wife, Teresa Hathaway Hawley (also 1874). This would have been Addie's grandmother on her mother's side.

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Homer Hoyt at age 17 (late 1850s or early 1860s)

Homer Hoyt was Addie's father, and he was my great-great grandfather. He's pictured here at age 17 (about 1858). Homer was from Vermont, but by the early 1860s, Homer had moved to Lake Mills, where he met Julia Hawley. They were married about 1864.

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Homer in 1888

Homer Hoyt in 1888. He would have been about 47 years old here. Homer died in 1894 at the age of 53. He's buried in Washington State, but has a memorial marker in the Lake Mills cemetery. Note the masonic emblem around his neck.

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Julia Hawley Hoyt in 1888.

Julia Hawley Hoyt in 1888. She was Addie's mother. Homer (pictured above) and Julia had three children: Anna, Addie and Eugene. Julia died a few months after Homer, in January 1895. Addie married Enoch 13 months after her mother's death.

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Egue

Eugene was the baby of the family and was born in 1875. He never married and never had children. He lived in Lake Mills for a time (in his adulthood), but after Addie's death, he left the area. He became an itinerant machinist and traveled around the Midwest looking for work. That's a surprise actually, because this guy doesn't look like an itinerant machinist. Eugene looks like someone who became a fancy tailor or a French chef. Nice tie.

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My great-grandmother (right) was Anna Hoyt Whitmore. Shes pictured here with her sister, Addie. Addie would have been about 15 in this photo (born 1872) and Anna would have been 21.

My great-grandmother (right) was Anna Hoyt Whitmore. She's pictured here with her sister, Addie (Ada) Hoyt. Addie (born January 22, 1872) would have been about 15 in this photo and Anna (born December 1, 1866) would have been 21. Anna lived to be 99 years old. Addie did not.

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Anna met and married a fine young gent named Wilbur Walter Whitmore and married him in the late 1880s. Theyre pictured here shortly before their marriage. Wilbur was reputedly a fine and decent fellow. He was also my great grandfather. It was Wilbur to whom Addie sent that photo album in Christmas 1900.

Anna met a fine young gent named Wilbur Walter Whitmore and married him in the late 1880s. Soon after their marriage, they moved to Denver, where they remained for the rest of their married lives. They're pictured here shortly before their marriage. Wilbur was reputedly a fine and decent fellow. He was also my great grandfather. It was Wilbur to whom Addie sent that photo album in Christmas 1900. Judging by this photo, one would have to say that Anna and Wilbur were a pair of swingers!

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Wilbur

Great-grandfather Wilbur W. Whitmore and I share a birthday: July 4th. He and Anna were married until his death in 1939. After Wilbur died, Anna moved to Santa Monica to live with her daughter (my grandmother) Florence Whitmore Fuller. He worked for the railroads and was a skilled negotiator.

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Addie

Addie in 1894, about two years before she married Enoch Fargo of Lake Mills.

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Addie married Enoch Fargo.

Addie married Enoch Fargo in 1896, and remained in Lake Mills until her death in 1901. Addie and Enoch did not have any children. Enoch had three daughters by his first wife, Mary Rutherford. Two of them survived to adulthood, and also had children.

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Ernie

My great -grandmother Anna Hoyt Whitmore had three children with Wilbur; Ernie (shown above), Victor, and Florence (my grandmother). Ernie was six years old in this photo, and he died shortly after this picture was taken. He was born in 1888 and died in 1894.

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In 12 months time, Addie mourned the loss of her little nephew (six year old Ernie, above), and then her father (1894) and then her mother (1895). And in February 1896, she married Enoch Fargo.

In June 19, 1901, Addie died under suspicious circumstances.

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Florence Whitmore was Anna's daughter, and she married a tall thin gent named Edgar Atkinson Fuller. Florence is pictured here in 1922. Florence was born in 1891.

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Baby Boys in 1919

Florence and Edgar had only two children: Thomas Hoyt Fuller (left) and Edgar A. Fuller, Junior (right). The twins were born June 13, 1919. Thomas Hoyt Fuller was named after his grandmother's side of the family. Florence's brother Victor never had children, and Ernie died at six years old. The twins were the only great-grandchildren of Homer and Julia Hawley Hoyt.

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This photo - from 1922 - shows Wilbur and Anna Hoyt Whitmore taking their twin grandsons out for a ride. My father is sitting with Wilbur and my Uncle Ed is sitting with his maternal grandmother, Anna Hoyt Whitmore (Addie's sister).

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Thomas Hoyt Fuller (left) and Edgar Atkinson Fuller (right) about 1943.

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The Fuller Twins in 1982.

The Fuller Twins in 1979. My father (Thomas Hoyt) is on the left.

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After Thomas Hoyt Fuller came home from the war, he married Betty Mae Brown of Berkeley (who'd served as a WAVE in WW2) and they had four children.

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Mom

Betty Mae and Tom Fuller in 1960.

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Dad

I'm pictured here with my father and three brothers, Rick, Tommy and Eddie at the Hoover Dam (1966). Notice my eldest brother Tom has a shirt made of fabric that matches my short little dress. My mother was an accomplished seamstress, and often made our clothes.

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On June 10, 2011, my father died, three days shy of his 92nd birthday.

On June 10, 2011, my father died, three days shy of his 92nd birthday. It was while I was cleaning out his apartment in an assisted living facility that I found the photos of Addie and Enoch Fargo. (Photo is courtesy of Dave Chance and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

My father (Thomas Hoyt Fuller), had four children, of which I am one. My Uncle Ed had two daughters, one of whom has passed on. My cousin and my three brothers and myself are the only great-great grandchildren of Homer and Julia Hoyt.

To read more about Addie, click here.

To learn about Sears Homes, click here.

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Addie’s Exhumation: Do I Regret Having Done All This?

November 28th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

The number one question I’m asked again and again is, “Now that the the autopsy findings are in, and they’re inconclusive, do you regret having done all this?”

The answer is, no, not at all. In fact, based on what was discovered, I’m reassured that I made exactly the right choice.

If it hadn’t been for the exhumation, we never would have known that Addie was buried in a shallow grave. A 34″ deep grave is not a proper burial. Addie’s remains have now arrived at my home in Norfolk, and she will be given a Christian funeral.

Secondly, without the exhumation, we would never have known that she was buried in her dress shoes. That is a powerful bit of evidence, and provides yet another proof that the official story (diphtheria) is pure fiction.

Thirdly, knowing that she did not die of diphtheria, and knowing that there was probably foul play involved, and knowing that she was not given a proper burial at a proper depth and that there was no burial permit (a violation of state law), it feels like a good decision to move her remains out of the plot in Lake Mills.

Do I regret having gone through all the time, trouble and expense of exhuming a body to learn more about a 110-year-old murder mystery?

Nope. Not at all. It was a good decision. I’m confident that Addie would be pleased.

To see the article (and video) that appeared in Thursday’s Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, click here.

To read more about Addie, click here.

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The digging started at about 8:45 am.

Shallow

Addie's remains were found at 34" of depth.

Addies exhumation shallow

This photo shows how shallow the grave was.

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Rose examines some of the remains that were unearthed.

Addies helpers

Addie's helpers searching for skeletal remains.

Addie

The story of Addie's mysterious demise seems to captivate everyone.

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Funeral director Dave Olsen stands in the background (orange shirt), ready to transport Addie's remains to the Medical Examiner's office in Milwaukee. Throughout this experience, Addie's remains were treated with the utmost respect. And Dave Olsen was one of the angels that helped me navigate the labyrinthine and complex process of disinterment.

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Another view of the grave site.

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Dr. Oatway, Why *Were* You in Such a Hurry?

November 23rd, 2011 Sears Homes 6 comments

Doctor Oatway must have been in quite a hurry when he filled out Addie’s death certificate, for he made a number of mistakes on the form.

1)  Addie’s name. Oatway wrote “Adelina,” which he apparently assumed was Addie’s given name. It was not. Her real name was Ada, and on her own marriage certificate (dated February 1895), Addie gave her legal name as “Addie.” You’d think Oatway would have asked the bereaved husband about the recently deceased’s real name, but apparently Enoch was busy doing other things at the time.

2)  Addie’s birth date. For Addie’s birth date, Oatway put down 1872. That’s just sloppy. Addie’s birth date was January 22, 1872. Why didn’t Oatway ask Enoch or one of the girls about Addie’s birthday? One would have to guess that Enoch wasn’t very good at remembering Addie’s birthday.

3)  Addie’s age. Okay, so he got the year right (1872), but how did he come up with 29 years and 1 month as her age? It was probably just a wild guess. Oatway apparently reasoned that no one was going to examine this document too closely. There’s a line on the form for years, months and days. He left the “days” blank, and took a stab at the “months.”

4)  Mother and Father’s name. Oatway listed them as “Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt.” That’s rather pathetic. Couldn’t he ask Enoch about this one? I guess not. Apparently Enoch was busy doing other things.

5) Mother and Father’s birthplace. Oatway listed both parents as being from Wisconsin. Ding, ding, ding, wrong answer for Father! Homer was from Vermont.

6)  Birthplace of deceased: Wisconsin. Given the extra long line at this entry, I think the preparers of this form are asking for a CITY or county, not just the state. But I suspect Oatway was in quite a state himself, and this was the best he could do. Addie was born in Milford. At least Oatway got it right on the obituary.

7)  Cemetary? Okay, this isn’t a true mistake but it’s an interesting aside. Oatway misspelled “cemetery.” He spelled it, cemetary. You’d think that in his line of work, he had probably spelled out that word a few times in past years. Was it stress? Or was he just a lousy speller?

8 )  Burial permit. He said Addie’s burial permit had been obtained, and it was burial permit #32. This was not true. There was no burial permit for Addie. Burial permit #32 belonged to Alinda Hornickle, who died March 1902. The burial permit was a state document, and Dr. Oatway was a county official, falsifying a state record. Now that’s bad. And yet later, when he filed his report to the State Board of Health, he said there were no deaths from diphtheria in Lake Mills in 1901. To learn more about why this is so important, click here.

9) Funeral director: Given the tremendous haste with which Addie was allegedly buried (and the fact that she wasn’t even buried to a proper depth), it’s not likely that a funeral director had any involvement in this. Had he been involved, he would have been at risk for incurring the wrath of state officials for participating in a “wee hours”  burial with no burial permit. As mentioned elsewhere, the burial permit was a state record, and to be a party to this chicanery could have caused the funeral director to lose his license.

10)  Cause of death: Diphtheria. This is the principle reason that this death certificate is such a farce. Oatway said that Addie died when the diphtheric membrane broke off in her throat and strangled her. According to the CDC, it takes 2-3 days for that membrane to form. There are entire blogs written about why this is such a farce, but in short, when children perished from the growth of this diphtheria membrane, they typically died 4-5 days after onset of the disease. According to Oatway’s own report, Addie died 16 hours after a slight sore throat began. To read the full story as to why this is such nonsense, click here, here or here.

How did Oatway ever end up as County Health Officer?

And I’d love to know the precise circumstances under which this was written. Was he sitting on the top step at the Fargo Mansion, bearing down on his knee as he tried to calm his nerves and scribble out something in a hurry?

To learn more about Addie, click here.

Addie was born into wealth and privilege, and its mighty hard to understand how this beautiful, smart, vivacious woman ended up dead at 29, buried in a shallow grave.

Addie was born into wealth and privilege, and it's mighty hard to understand how this beautiful, smart, vivacious woman ended up dead at 29, buried in a shallow grave. And you can see here, she was a snappy dresser by the age of two.

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This is my favorite Addie photo. It really bespeaks her station in life.

This is my favorite Addie photo. It really bespeaks her station in life, and it shows her elegance and poise. Given the pose struck here, one wonders if she was a model.

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But it all ended tragically when she ended up dead at 29.

But it all ended tragically when she ended up dead at 29. As mentioned above, this death certificate is rife with errors. Look at the name: Adalina? Where'd he come up with that?

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Note the "name of mother" and "name of father," and also Addie's age (line 7). She was born on January 22, 1872, and her age would have been 29 years, four months and 27 days.

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Burial

Burial permit #32 belonged to Alinda Hornickle who died March 26, 1902 at 3:00 am. This is very damning evidence that Oatway did falsify this document. Addie's burial permit should have been number 22 (based on the date of her death).

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This report (shown above) appeared in the "Report of the State Board of Health" for Wisconsin and covered the the time period during which Addie Hoyt allegedly died of diphtheria. You'll note, there's no mention of any deaths (or even cases) of diphtheria in Lake Mills in 1901.

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This statement, taken from the above text and penned by Oatway, says that if there was a case of diphtheria in his town (Lake Mills), it *would* be reported.

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Unless you're paid off to falsify a death certificate...

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burial

Stats on diphtheria deaths, as seen in the 1899-1900 "Report of the State Board of Health." In smaller towns, the mortality rate from diphtheria was much less than the statewide average of 13%, and was closer to 9%. In Milwaukee (Wisconsin's largest town with 280,000 residents), the mortality rate was closer to 16.75%.

To learn more about Addie, click here.

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