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Posts Tagged ‘tiny houses’

Marguerite’s Beautiful and Beloved #124

February 5th, 2014 Sears Homes 4 comments

Last year, Sears homeowner Marguerite Deppert saw my blogs (here and here) on Sears Modern Home #124 and sent me several wonderful photos of her own home, which she had recently purchased in Montvale, NJ.

It’s a real beauty and in gorgeous condition. I wouldn’t be surprised if Montvale has many Sears Homes, due in part to the fact that they’re less than 30 miles from Port Newark, where Sears had a large mill. (Sears had but two mills - one in Cairo, IL and one in Newark, NJ.)

Thanks so much to Marguerite Deppert for sharing these photos with me! I’ve been drooling over them all morning!

To see a wide variety of pictures of Sears Modern Home 124, click here.

Did you know there’s a #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia? Click here to see that.

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Number 124 was gone by 1918 (when Sears Homes were given names), but it seemed to be a fairly popular house. Its certainly distinctive!

Sears Modern Home #124 was gone from the catalogs by 1918 (when Sears Homes were given names), but it seemed to be a fairly popular house. It's certainly distinctive! (1916)

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Marguerites house was even mentioned in the 1916 catalog!

Marguerite's house was even mentioned in the 1916 catalog!

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Spaciosu floor plan.

Some of the older homes have rather "odd" floorplans, but #124 was quite sensible.

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Years ago, Rebecca Hunter and I toured the inside of the #124 in Crystal Lake, IL and that little bathroom shown above was really tucked away under that sloping roof. Interesting, but almost claustrophobic.

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Nice house, and a darn good price!

Nice house, and a darn good price!

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Oh my, what a house!

Oh my, what a house! Even the detail around the chimneys is a match to the vintage image! (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Wow.

The rock border on the driveway is a nice complement to the stone columns. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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phoo

A view from the side highlights that beautiful stone work on the chimney. The two chimneys are covered with stone to the roofline, and then above the roofline, they're brick. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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close up

Close up of those unique details on the front porch. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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house

What a fine-looking house. What a treasure for Montvale. And I suspect Marguerite is one of the happiest homeowners in America! (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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details

Look at those wee tiny second-floor windows tucked up under that porch roof. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

What a beautiful house!

What a beautiful house! Just stunning. (Photo is copyright 2013 Marguerite Deppert and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Thanks again to Marguerite for sharing these wonderful photos!

To see a wide variety of pictures of Sears Modern Home 124, click here.

Did you know there’s a #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia? Click here to see that.

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Modern Home #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia

May 20th, 2012 Sears Homes 7 comments

Last week, I posted photos of Sears Modern Home #124 in different parts of the country. Rachel Shoemaker then discovered that there was another “Model 124” in Lincolnton, Georgia and she sent me a link with a photo.

I sent a couple inquiries out, asking if anyone near Lincolnton could get some photos for me. Steve and Teresa Howland responded and said, “Sounds like a fun project. We’ll get a photo for you!”

And then yesterday, after I returned home from my five-day trek to North Carolina, I found a plethora of beautiful photos in my email, courtesy of Steve and Teresa Howland.

As I’ve always said, all the nicest people love old houses and history.  :)

And these are wonderful photos!

To read the previous blog about Sears Modern Home #124, click here.

To hear Rose’s recent interview on WUNC (with Frank Stasio), click here.

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

The original catalog page, featuring #124 (1916).

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The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty!

The #124 in Lincolnton, Georgia! Oh my, what a beauty! And look at how even the brick chimneys are a perfect match! Most likely, the Ionic columns were not original to the house, but are replacements. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And our view

This photo really shows off that dramatic overhang on the third-floor. I'm not sure why anyone would design a house with this feature. Is there a tangible benefit or was this done for appearance's sake? Because it's a pretty odd feature! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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As I said, these photos are wonderful! Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia.

Another view of this wonderful house in Lincolnton, Georgia. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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And looking straight on!

And looking straight on! I think this is her best angle! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Awesome details around the door!

Awesome details around the door. I am still puzzled by those columns. Are they wood or cement? They're pretty substantial looking. The bracing on the underside of the eaves was not original to the house. These were often added to support the oversized eaves, which sometimes sag with age. Who among us doesn't understand the angst of having our once-sturdy eaves start to sag a bit? (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Look at the details!

Look at the details! I'm not sure what the purpose of that little hole was, but it's an interesting little feature. (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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Wow!

Wow! Now that's a good match!! And a beautiful photo, too! (Photo is copyright 2012 Steve and Teresa Howland and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.)

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So, there are more of these!  Do I have any readers in these cities?  :)

So, there are more of these! Do I have any readers in these cities? :)

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And last but not least, a heart-felt thank you to Steve and Teresa Howland for driving out to Lincolnton, Georgia and taking the time to get such wonderful photos!  As is evidenced by the last photo above, they did a first-rate job in getting the angle just right, so it’s a perfect match to the original catalog page!

Thanks Steve and Teresa!

To learn more about kit homes, click here.

To read another blog that showcases another “random act of old house kindness,” click here.

To listen to my favorite “Georgia” song, click here.

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The Calumet: 20 Rooms in 12!

March 30th, 2012 Sears Homes 2 comments

Sears always had an interesting way of ciphering. The Calumet was a four-apartment kit “house” with 12 rooms. The “20 rooms in 12″ was a little misleading.

The eight mystery rooms were “bedrooms” which were really teeny-tiny closets. Inside those eight tiny closets were eight fold-away beds (Murphy beds). The “bedroom in a closet” idea was heralded as a great space-saving device and a money-saving device too. After all, there’s no need to buy rugs and pictures and chairs and night stands when you sleep in a closet.

Who needs a bedroom anyway?

I’ve only seen one Calumet and that was in Bloomington, IL and it had been greatly altered.

The typical Sears Home was a 12,000 piece kit that was bundled and shipped in one boxcar. The Calumet was probably a bit more than 12,000 pieces. It was 2,800+ square feet, but it also had four kitchens and four bathrooms and a lot of steps, railings and porches. And a lot of doors.

And eight beds.

And all for a mere $3,073.

To learn more about Murphy Beds, click here.

Twenty rooms in 12 promised the header on this page.

"Twenty rooms in 12" promised the header on this page.

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The beds came with this kit apartment.

The built-in wall beds came with the Sears Calumet. They were hidden behind nice-looking French doors! I wonder how long these primitive metal-framed beds survived in these old four-plexes?

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house

Only three rooms per apartment, but they are fairly spacious. And note the small windows in the "bedroom" (closet).

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And

Close-up on those wall beds in the dining room and living room.

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The Cinderella was another Sears House that promoted use of stowaway beds. Note the

The "Cinderella" was another Sears House that promoted use of stowaway beds. Note the text at the bottom of this page: "You are saved the expense of two extra bedrooms in your house, as well as the additional expense of rugs and furniture..."

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And what exactly do you get for $3,073?

And what exactly do you get for $3,073?

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Close-up of the Calumet as shown in the 1918 catalog.

Close-up of the Calumet as shown in the 1918 catalog.

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Sears Calumet in Bloomington, IL.

Sears Calumet in Bloomington, IL.

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To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn more about multi-family Sears kit apartments, click here.

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Pink Houses, Great and Small

April 6th, 2011 Sears Homes 2 comments

The fact is, I’m just biding my time in the 21st Century until the smart people figure out how to travel through time. Once that happens, I’ll get back to the 1920s, where I belong. Until then, I’ll just have to pretend that’s where I live.

My current home is a 1925 Colonial Revival in Colonial Place, Norfolk (Virginia). It’s a grand old house, but the repairs have been substantial. In the last four years, we’ve spent more than $40,000 doing repairs and improvements.

One of the “improvements” was the little house we had built in the back yard.  “La Petite Manse” is the creation of artisan and master craftsman David Strickland. He and I worked together to design the little house, and David built it. It’s designed to mirror the look of the 1925 Colonial, and I’m tickled pink with the work David did.

I love my little house. Sometimes, I just sit in the back yard and admire the little house. It makes me happy.

Little house

For my 50th birthday, my husband bought me a brass plaque that reads, "3916-1/2." The little house likes having its own address.

Another view of the happy little house. It has a second floor, with a built-in ladder.

Another view of the happy little house. It has a floored attic, accessed with a built-in ladder.

The big house likes sharing its 1/4-acre lot with the little house.

The big house likes sharing its 1/4-acre lot with the little house.

Pergola

Mr. Hubby spent a year full of weekends building me this beautiful pergola. It's now one of our favorite spots in the spring and summer.

To read about the kit homes in Colonial Place, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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