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Kit Homes in Kinston - What a Bonanza!

January 25th, 2016 Sears Homes 2 comments

Was I surprised to find 19 Aladdin kit homes in Kinston? My oh my, yes! And those 19 were found during a very quick windshield survey. There are more lurking about, I’m sure.

Last week, my husband and I visited New Bern, and while there, we drove out to Kinston to look at the local architecture. Lo and behold, we found an Aladdin kit home on almost every street in the older neighborhoods. In one memorable area (near Harding and Pollock Streets) we found seven Aladdin homes together.

The older suburbs we visited had many wide-open spaces, suggesting that many of these early 20th Century kit homes have already been demolished.

If you’re new to this website, you may be wondering, what is a kit home? In the early 1900s, aspiring homeowners could order a “kit home” from the Sears Roebuck catalog. Each 12,000-piece kit came with a 75-page instruction book and a promise that the neophyte homebuilder could have the house ready for  occupancy in 90 days. In addition to Sears, there were other companies selling kit homes through mail-order catalogs, such as Aladdin (based in Bay City, Michigan) and Gordon Van Tine (Davenport, Iowa).

Aladdin was bigger than Sears, in business longer, and sold more homes than Sears, but they’re not as well known as Sears. Aladdin had a mill in Wilmington, North Carolina, which explains why Aladdin Homes were so popular in the Southeast.

Based on my research, the overwhelming majority of people living in these kit homes didn’t know what they had, until I contacted them (or they discovered their home on my blog).

What was the industry that promoted Kinston’s growth in the early 1900s, and put them on the map? Industries often turned to Aladdin to supply housing for the workers. It’s likely that someone turned to Aladdin for the houses we’re now finding in Kinston, but who was it?

Lastly, before we get into the photos, I’m hoping some progressive-minded soul in Kinston will contact me about coming back to town to do a thorough survey. Perhaps identifying these bungalows as historically significant kit homes can be a key to revitalizing parts of Kinston.

Let’s hope.

Contact Rose by leaving a comment below.

In addition to the 19 Aladdin homes, I found a lone Gordon Van Tine home: The Peach House Restaurant! And it’s a real beauty! You can read more about that by clicking here!

You can read here about the kit homes I found in New Bern, NC.

UPDATE! We found a Montgomery Ward kit home in Kinston, too!

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1914 Moosejaw

Aladdin sold more homes than Sears, but was not as well known.

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1916

What was the industry that promoted Kinston's growth in the early 1900s, and put them on the map? It seems very likely that *that* employer turned to Aladdin to supply worker homes in Kinston.

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houses

Aladdin had catalogs devoted to "solving the problem of industrial housing."

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Aladdin 1916

Aladdin was named for the magical genie who built "a house in a day" for his master. Apparently, Old Genie is perusing the latest catalog to find a snappy design.

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1919

The Shadow Lawn is one of my favorites. It was spacious and beautiful (1919).

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Shadow two

When I drove in Kinston, the first house I spotted was this Aladdin Shadowlawn on Lenoir Avenue. Looks like it walked right off the pages of the 1919 catalog (shown above).

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Shadow

During our brief time in Kinston, I initially missed this Shadowlawn (another beauty) on Atlantic Avenue. Shown above is a screenshot from Google Maps. It's another delightfully original house.

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1916

The "Colonial" was probably Aladdin's biggest (and fanciest) kit home.

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19 Colonial

And there's one in Kinston! Do the owners know that they're living in a kit home?

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1919 Classic Bungalow

The Pomona was a classic early 20th Century bungalow (1919).

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Pollock 805

This was my favorite Pomona in Kinston (which has three of them). This house still as so many of its original features, including the half-timber effect on the porch gable, original windows with diamond muntins and those rectangular eave brackets. And that appears to be an old wooden storm door.

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305 Washington

This Pomona on Washington Street is also a lovely home, but its windows have been replaced.

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810 Collge

The years have not been kind to this Pomona on College Street.

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Carolina 1923

In all my travels, I'd never seen an Aladdin "Carolina." It seems fitting that there are not one but two Carolinas in Kinston, North Carolina. This image is from the 1923 catalog.

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605 Rhem

This Carolina on Rhem Street is in picture-perfect condition.

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308 Capitol

This is an Aladdin "Carolina" and it does have its original windows, so that's a plus. It's had some insensitive remodeling. Anything salt-treated on an old house is just not a good plan.

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Willard 1919

I've not seen that many "Willards" in my travels, but there are two in Kinston (1919).

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Details

It's also a cute little house with lots of interesting details and features.

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Willard 413 Harding

And this Willard on Harding Street is perfect - right down to the lattice!

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Willard on Harding

From every angle, it's a beauty!

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Porch

And it's astounding that 100 years later, that lattice is still in such good shape.

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811 Pollock

On an opposing corner, I found this Willard which has had some remodeling, but still looks a lot like a Willard. It's a pity that the guy-wire got in the way of an otherwise perfect picture.

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1919

The Virginia was a popular house for Aladdin (1919).

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310 Capitola

This "Virginia" on Capitola Street is next door to the Carolina shown above!

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Capitola

Okay, so we lost the little girl (in the image on the right) and gained a trash can, but other than that, it's a lovely match. And a pretty house, too!

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Florence 1916

The Florence was a popular house for Aladdin and I've found an abundance of these in North Carolina's mill towns. There are two Florence models in Kinston.

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Florence

And they're across the street from each other. This is on Harding.

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406 Harding

And so is this one.

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1919 BLVD

The Aladdin Boulevard was not a hugely popular house (1919).

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BLVD

But it is distinctive with that low shed dormer and the window arrangement. The Boulevard has 12/1 windows on the front porch (1919).

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Street

This was the first "Boulevard" I've ever seen. On this model, someone took out those living windows when they put in that fireplace. There's also an addition on the rear of the house.

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House

In this picture, you can see those 12/1 windows on the Kinston "Boulevard."

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1924 Sunshine

The "Sunshine" was a popular house with a really cute name (1924).

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Sunshine

"You are my Sunshine, my only Sunshine..." This was the only Sunshine we found in Kinston.

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Street

These four models were lined up like little soldiers in a row on Pollock Street in Kinston.

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Harassment Street

The Willard is to the far left, with the Sunshine next, the Boulevard beyond it, and the Pomona at the end of the run. Kitty-corner to this Willard was The Perfect Willard, and the two Florences are behind this WIllard. These are the seven Aladdins mentioned above.

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Bruns 1923

I've been looking for an Aladdin Brunswick for a long time, butt prior to coming to Kinston, I'd never laid eyes on the real deal (1923 catalog).

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509 Washington

And Kinston has two of them. This house is on West Washington.

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Brunsh

A distinctive feature of the Brunswick is this window arrangement on the side of the house. The centered window is a staircase-landing window. The small windows are closet windows.

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Brusnswisk

This is another house that I missed on my first drive through town, and found when I was double-checking addresses via Google Maps. It's in pitiable shape. It's just off Perry and Atlantic, and just around the corner from that stunning Aladdin Shadowlawn. I hope this home has a hope of restoration.

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GVT

And the Gordon Van Tine #705 was the only non-Aladdin home I found in Kinston.

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Moo

Now this is a beautiful house - and it's also a restaurant!

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Gustatory Delights

Had we only been more familiar with the delicious delights offered at The Gordon Van Tine #705 Restaurant, errr, the "Peach House" we would have stopped there for lunch!

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At the end of the day,

At the end of our trip to Kinston, Hubby was mighty glad to get back to our "home away from home," The Aerie Bed and Breakfast in New Bern. He was tired of looking at houses.

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You can visit The Peach House website here.

To read about what I found in nearby New Bern, click here.

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Something For My “Wish List”

December 3rd, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

Updated! Jennifer found one!

Of the 370 models of kit homes offered by Sears & Roebuck, there are about 150 models that I’ve never seen. One of the most intriguing is the “Monterey.” It was very similar to the highly popular Sears Alhambra, but with a few minor differences, both inside and out.

The Monterey was offered only in the 1924 catalog, which is a fairly rare catalog. The Alhambra was offered for about a decade and proved to be highly popular and yet its “kissing cousin” seems to have never caught on. And of the two houses, I’d think the Monterey would be more popular.

One very commen complaint about the Alhambra is that roof leaks behind those dormers are very common (see image below), and “crickets” have to be added to deflect rain water away from the dormers. If you look at the photos below, you’ll see that the Monterey was designed with those crickets already in place. And the Monterey has a gabled roof over the staircase wing, rather than a flat roof (like the Alhambra).

I’m a big fan of the Alhambra but the Monterey’s dramatic parapet is snazzier and more appealing. And to think that I’ve never seen one in real life! The humanity!

Is there a Sears Monterey in your neighborhood?

If so, please let me know.

To read more about The Alhambra, click here.

Do you have a Sears Home? Learn more here.

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The Sears Monterey was offered only in the 1924 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

The Sears Monterey was offered only in the 1924 Sears Modern Homes catalog, which might be one reason why there aren't many of these (if any) in the world.

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In this image, you can see the cricket behind that dormer.

In this image, you can see the "cricket" behind that dormer, which deflects rain water and helps prevent leaks behind that dormer. Plus, that staircase wing has a gabled roof, instead of the flat roof present on the Alhambra.

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Its very close to the Sears Alhambra, and in the 1924 catalog, theyre on opposing sides of the same page.

The Monterey is very similar to the Sears Alhambra, and in the 1924 catalog, they're on opposing sides of the same two-page spread. The "interior photos" are apparently a fit for either the Monterey or Alhambra.

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A side-by-side comparison of the two floor plans show some minor differences of the two houses.

A side-by-side comparison of the two floor plans show some minor differences of the two houses. The Monterey is on the right. The most striking difference is that someone moved the baby grand piano.

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There are several differences on the second floor, too.

In this image, the Monterey is on the left side (oops), and the Alhambra is on the right. One curiosity is that bathroom. In the Monterey, the sink was placed in what seems to be a very awkward spot. Closets have also been shifted around a bit.

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fff

That living room is just dazzling, and I love the chaise on the sunporch. That floor lamp with the fringe is pretty sweet too, and who doesn't love pink curtains? The 1924 catalog had several color images (such as shown on this blog) and yet it's a fairly rare catalog.

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tes

I wonder how often people followed the color suggestions for these homes.

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Sears

Now that is a fine-looking house! I'd love to find one - somewhere.

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To read more about The Alhambra, click here.

Do you have a Sears Home? Learn more here.

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A Sears Detroit, Just Outside of Detroit!

June 4th, 2015 Sears Homes 5 comments

While doing research on Sears’ mortgages in Troy, Detroit, fellow researchers Andrew and Wendy Mutch found a mortgage for this house on Daley Road! It appears to be a Sears “Detroit,” which is a model I’ve never seen before - so that suggests it’s a fairly rare model. And it was only offered in the 1932 and 1933 Sears Modern Homes catalog. (Troy is about 22 miles north of Detroit, Michigan.)

There are a few head-scratchers with this one, though. The mortgage was recorded in June 1931, but “Detroit” didn’t make an appearance until the 1932 catalog. Secondly, the city assessor’s website gives a build date of 1930, but those are often unreliable. Lastly, the chimney for the house is in the wrong place.

The Sears Detroit shows the chimney right in the roof’s valley (a terrible spot for a chimney), but the house in Troy has the chimney outside of the valley.

Did the home’s first owners (Stuart and Hilda Baker) have the wisdom and foresight to shift that chimney a bit, and move it out of the valley? Or was the house customized (perhaps with a larger kitchen) which moved the chimney to the side a bit? Unfortunately, the assessor’s website doesn’t give the home’s dimensions.

Thanks so much to Andrew and Wendy Mutch for doing this research and discovering this unusual home! And thanks also to Andrew and Wendy for sharing their photos!

To read more about the Sears Homes in Michigan, click here.

To visit the Mutch’s website, click here!

We have a fun group on Facebook. Click here to learn more.

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The Sears Detroit was first offered in the 1932 catalog.

The Sears "Detroit" was first offered in the 1932 catalog.

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And it last appeared in 1933.

And it last appeared in 1933.

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House

It's a mere 875 square feet.

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It has some interesting windows.

The assymetrical front gable and small window is a distinctive feature that can help identify the Sears Detroit. Notice that the chimney pokes up right in the roof's valley.

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Here it is

The house in Troy has a chimney that's offset from the valley. With the Sears mortgage, it's almost certainly a Sears House, but is it a modified Detroit? Might well be. More than 30% of Sears Homes were customized when built. Expanding the kitchen a bit would change the placement of that chimney. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another view of the Sears Detroit.

Another view of the Sears Detroit. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Look down the left side of the floorplan.

Look down the left side of the floorplan. It sure is a good match down the left side, and this is a rather unique arrangement. The living room is pretty large, considering that the whole house is only 875 sfla.

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Something

It's a good match down the right side, too but something really weird is doing on with that bathroom window. I'm not sure what to make of this. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Andrew and Wendy need to get themselves one of those Ronco Pocket Chain Saws to deal with these landscaping problems.

Andrew and Wendy need to get themselves one of those Ronco Pocket Chain Saws to deal with these unfortunate landscaping issues. I'm sure the oners wouldn't mind seeing the house get a little trim. Photo is copyright 2015 Andrew and Wendy Mutch and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Do you have a Detroit in YOUR neighborhood?

Do you have a Detroit in YOUR neighborhood?

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I see its been exactly 30 days since I wrote a blog for this site. Frankly, its garden season here in Hampton Roads and Ive spent many a happy hour digging in the dirt, trimming the azaleas, planting the tomatoes and having fun outside. Well, there have been episodes Id deign less than fun, such as when I was off the fascia and soffit, and managed to fall over backwards in the front flowerbed, which, it turns out, is a really bad idea if you have a cute little pagoda in that front flower bed. Fortunately, the various owies associated with this event are almost healed.

I see it's been exactly 30 days since I wrote a new blog, and there are some specific reasons for that. For one, it's garden season here in Hampton Roads and I've spent many a happy hour digging in the dirt, trimming the azaleas, planting the tomatoes and having fun outside. Well, there have been "episodes" which I'd assert were LESS than fun, such as when I was reaching way over my head, washing off the fascia and soffit with a long-handled brush, and managed to fall over backwards in the front flowerbed, which, it turns out, is a really bad idea if you have a cute little pagoda in that front flower bed. Fortunately, the multitudinous owies associated with this event are almost healed. Almost.

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Thanks so much to Andrew and Wendy Mutch for finding this unusual home!

To read more about the Sears Homes in Michigan, click here.

To visit the Mutch’s website, click here!

We have a fun group on Facebook. Click here to learn more.

To read about the relationship between Sears and Firestone Park, click here.

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This is a Sears House.

April 28th, 2015 Sears Homes 7 comments

This really is a Sears House.

Can you guess which model it is?

I would never have guessed. Ever.

However, I was given a good clue.

So what do you think?

It’s in Shorewood, Wisconsin, and this photo was taken by Elisabeth Witt, who’s been running around getting photos for me. And they’re well-framed, first-class, high-resolution photos, which makes a big difference - usually.

But with this particular house, even an old pro would be stumped.

Thanks to Elisabeth Witt for the contemporary photos shown below.

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Model

Yes, it really is a Sears House. Which model would you guess?

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Does this help?

Does this help?

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Maybe seeing it from this angle will help.

Maybe seeing it from this angle will help.

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Do you give up? You should.

Do you give up? You should. It's a Sears Hamilton.

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When Google mapped this neighborhood

When Google mapped this neighborhood in September 2014, the house above looked like this.

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Which looks a lot like this (1928 catalog).

Which looks a lot like this (1928 catalog).

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Heres a Hamilton that Dale Wolicki found in Kankakee, Illinois.

Here's a Hamilton that Dale Wolicki found in Kankakee, Illinois. Photo is copyright 2009 Dale Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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This photo (undated) is from the city assessors website.

This photo (undated) is from the Shorewood assessor's website.

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And if you zoom in on the details, youll see that this darling little house had its original windows, siding and even wooden storm windows.

And if you zoom in on the details, you'll see that this darling little house had its original windows, rafter tails, and even wooden storm windows. It was a fine-looking Hamilton.

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And then it got McMansioned.

And then it got McMansioned.

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And then it got McMansioned.

That trailer probably contains the dismembered bits of our little Hamilton.

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At first I thought Elisabeth had photographed the wrong house. After all, I wasnt 100% sure about the address.

At first I thought Elisabeth had photographed the wrong house. After all, I wasn't 100% sure about the address. But in this photo, you can see that our Hamilton sits next door to a blue craftsman-style bungalow.

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And then I noticed this.

And then I noticed this. It's definitely the house formerly known as "Hamilton."

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Rest in peace, little Hamilton.

Rest in peace, little Hamilton.

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Believe it or not, it could have been worse.

Believe it or not my little Wisconsin Hammie, it could have been worse. At least you were spared the T-111 siding (Elgin IL). Perhaps this blog should be titled, "When Bad Things Happen to Good Bungalows."

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To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To read a happy, happy blog, click here.

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Don’t Believe Everything You Read About Sears Homes…

April 19th, 2015 Sears Homes 4 comments

Especially in ads that appear on Craigs’ List.

Recently, someone in our Facebook Group (”Sears Homes”) pointed out that there was a Sears House listed for rent on Craigs’ List. In that this is not my first rodeo, I was dubious at best. I looked up the ad. I must admit, at first glance (without wearing eyeglasses), it did kinda sorta look a bit like a Sears Norwood. Kinda. Sorta. Problem was, it was too wide for the insufferably narrow Norwood, which is a mere 16′ wide.

I went to the assessor’s website and found the property card, which showed that the home for rent was 20′ wide, not 16′.

That’s enough to be a deal killer. In addition, these little front-gabled cottages were so common in early 20th Century America that you really have to be extra careful!

In 2004, I traveled to a city in middle Virginia to do a thorough survey of kit homes. I was introduced to a homeowner who’d paid a premium price for her bungalow because it had been promoted as a “Sears Kit Home.” I was put in the unfortunate position of  having to explain to her that it was not a kit home of any kind. She became very upset, and asked me if I was certain. Having spent 45 minutes examining the house from rooftop to basement, I told her I was quite sure. She said the Realtor and the lender’s appraiser had added some value because of the home’s “historical significance.”

I didn’t know what to tell her. It was a rough visit all the way around.

I wish Realtors would do a little tiny bit of research before blithely deciding that something is a Sears House. They claim to be “real estate professionals” and speaking as a former Realtor, they can and should do better than that.

To see the non-Sears-House ad, click here.

To read more about the Sears Mills in Norwood, Ohio and Cairo, Illinois, click here.

Want to learn a few tips about identifying Sears Homes? Click here.

Craigs

To add insult to injury, this house is advertised as "1908 Sears Home." The tax records show it was built in 1910. The Morely was first offered in 1918. The fact that this house is on the "Porter History Walk" makes it even more disturbing. Yikes. Has "research" become a dirty word?

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1690

The Norwood, from the 1919 Sears Modern Home catalog.

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1918

The Morley (1918 catalog) was very similar to the Norwood, but was 10 feet longer.

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1918

Side-by-side comparisons of the two floor plans highlight their differences.

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assessor

The city assessor's website shows the house in Porter is 20 feet wide. Sorry, but it's not a Sears House. I'm sure someone will leave a comment and say, "Maybe it's another model," and let me reassure you, this is not a Sears kit home.

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Heres a real life Morley in Norwood, Ohio.

Here's a real life Morley in Norwood, Ohio. Oh wait, it's not a Morley. Cindy Catanzaro looked up the assessor records and found it's a match for the Norwood, NOT the Morley. Oopsie.

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And a close-up of the address!

And a close-up of the address! Turns out, it's on Carthage Avenue.

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house

Close-up of the Sears Norwood. Notice that it has two windows flanking the front door.

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House

Here's a Norwood in Norwood, Ohio! How appropriate! You can see where the missing eave brackets once rested. Perhaps best of all, it looks like the house still has some of its orginal downspouts.

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literature

This is not a Sears House.

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Thanks to Mark Hardin for creating this meme. :)

Thanks to Rachel Shoemaker for creating this meme. :)

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To see the non-Sears-House ad, click here.

Want to learn a few tips about identifying Sears Homes? Click here.

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My Only Blog With an “R” Rating!

April 6th, 2015 Sears Homes 5 comments

Before you start reading this, please usher the children into another room and/or tell them to cover their ears and hum.

Sears only offered two models of kit homes that had a sink in the closet. One was their fanciest house (”The Magnolia”) and the other was one of their simplest designs (”The Cinderella”). Why put a sink in the corner of a dressing room or a closet? Running the necessary plumbing, drain lines and vent would have added some expense, so what’s the point?

There were a few obvious reasons: It gave the lady of the house a place to wash her “unmentionables” and it also gave the man a place to shave when the couple’s seven kids were hogging the bathroom.

But there might have been another lesser-known reason.

Are those kids gone? ;)

In the early 1900s, male prophylactics were “re-usable.” It wasn’t until the 1920s that latex was invented, and these particular items became single-use.

By the way, this particular insight as to the purpose of that master-bedroom sink is not my own, but was sent to me by a faithful reader of the blog. Best of all, it makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it? I’d love to give proper credit to the reader who shared this info with me, but I can’t remember who it was! Argh!

To learn more about The Cinderella, click here.

There are only nine known Magnolias in the country. You can read more here.

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house 1921

The Cinderella was a very modest house and apparently, they didn't sell too many of these. It was priced at $1,500 and yet only had a single bedroom. The dressing room was located off the living room.

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Cindy 1921

Close-up of the floorplan shows a sink in the dressing room.

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Cindy

Roll-away beds were heavily promoted for use in the Cinderella. Here, you can see the lady of the house has used the dressing room sink for washing out her delicate undergarments.

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DuMont

The DuMont was a pattern-book house offered in the 1920s. It also featured a sink in a closet.

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Dumont

Close-up of the sink in the DuMont off the master-bedroom.

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Sears Maggy 1921

Sears biggest and best house (The Magnolia) also had a sink in the closet.

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South bend

The Sears Magnolia in South Bend, Indiana has the original built-in cabinets, and an original closet sink, together with original faucets. Quite a find, and a testament to the quality of the materials.

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South Bend

Close-up of the sink in the South Bend Magnolia. It also has its original medicine chest and light fixture. This picture is almost two years old. I hope the new owner does an honest restoration of the old house. In all my travels, I've never seen a three-sided sink like this.

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West Virginia

The Magnolia in West Virginia also has its original cabinets in the closet, but the sink has been replaced. Interesting that the sink is placed right next to that window.

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To learn more about The Cinderella, click here.

There are only nine known Magnolias in the country. You can read more here.

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Strathmore + Willard = Strathard?

January 30th, 2015 Sears Homes 2 comments

The Strathmore has always been one of my favorite models of Sears Homes. Then again, Im a real sap for Tudoresque designs, and these Sears Tudors are utterly adorable.

The Strathmore has always been one of my favorite models of Sears Homes. Then again, I'm a real sap for Tudoresque designs, and these Sears Tudors are utterly adorable (1936 catalog). Seems like a very practical house, too.

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The Willard is another Sears neo-tudor thats also a darling little house.

The Willard is another Sears neo-tudor that's also a darling little house.

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It must have been a big seller for Sears, too. Ive found Willards throughout the country, including unusual spots like Norfolk, Virginia and Tallahassee, Alabama!

It must have been a big seller for Sears, too. I've found Willards throughout the country, including unusual spots like Norfolk, Virginia and Tallahassee, Alabama! And the Willard was featured in this advertisement, promoting the low cost of owning a Sears House.

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Apparently, sometime ago in Norwood Ohio, someone couldnt decide between the Willard and the Strathmore.

Apparently, sometime ago in Norwood Ohio, someone couldn't decide between the Willard and the Strathmore.

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So they built this.

So they built this. It's a Sears Willard, with the Strathmore foyer. Pretty cute, isn't it?

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Nice match!

Nice match - at least on the front porch!

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If you know the precise address of this house, please send it along. It’s in Norwood, Ohio and the street number is 2215 (visible in the photos above). All I need now is the street’s name!

Update! Dale Haynes (from our Sears House Facebook group) discovered the street address! This house is on Glenside in Norwood, Ohio! Yay for Dale!!!  :)

Want to learn more about why Norwood is so important to the story of Sears Homes? Click here.

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Wardway #166: A Most Unusual Combination of Values

December 8th, 2014 Sears Homes 5 comments

Last month, I traveled to Oklahoma to visit Rachel Shoemaker, and we had a lovely couple days together.

Rachel drove me out to Chelsea (down historic Route 66), where we saw a picture-perfect Sears Saratoga. Next stop was just around the corner, where Rachel showed me a Wardway #166, a model I’ve never seen before!

And honestly, it’s a model I would have missed if I’d been on my own! It was offered only a handful of years in the mid-1910s Wardway catalogs.

And perhaps best of all, the interior of this house is in stunningly original condition, replete with solid oak woodwork, original light fixtures, windows and doors.

Many thanks to Rachel for finding this gem, and also for taking the photos!

To visit Rachel’s website, click here.

To read more about Wardway, click here.

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This Wardway Home #166 was only offered for a handful of years.

This Wardway Home #166 was only offered for a handful of years (1915 catalog).

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House

I love the "liner notes" on this house, especially the last line.

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Floor plan

What's the difference between a "verandah" and a porch? A "chamber" and a bedroom? I'm not sure. I would guess that a verandah is an open area, like a patio, and yet the verandah on the #166 is covered, not open.

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House

This bungalows is unusually spacious on the 2nd floor.

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House

Modern Home #166 is a real beauty, but the model in Chelsea, Oklahoma is the only one I've ever seen.

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Wardway House

This is one of the first pictures I've taken with my new TV-phone. Unfortunately, we were looking right into the sun, but it does show what a nice match this is to the catalog image.

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The homes exterior was stunning, but the inside was even more enchanting.

The home's exterior was stunning, but the inside was even more enchanting. Inside, we found that all the oak trim was original (and beautiful), and unpainted. The fireplace is made with glazed block. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission. This means you.

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Living room

If you're a lover of solid oak trim, this house will make you swoon. Throughout the house, the quarter-sawn oak trim is unpainted, original and has a stunning patina. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Light fixture

Even the light fixtures are original. BTW, I'm sure there is a specific name for this type of fixture (at the junction of two beams), but I don't know what it is. If you do, pleave leave a comment below? Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Dining Room or parlor

And yes, those pocket doors are also solid oak. (View into the parlor.) Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Bow swar

Leaded-glass windows abound, and are in flawless condition. Let's pause and say a little prayer that the home's next owner doesn't rip these out in favor of some shiny new plastic crap windows. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Living

Standing in the living room, looking toward the dining room. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

Check out those bookcase colonnades in the dining room. Oh me, oh my. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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ffff

Will the new owner have the sense to preserve these old fixtures? Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Hallway shot

Standing in the front hallway, looking toward the stairs. This staircase was captivating. It looks like a traditional staircase, and yet there's a door that swings closed on the third stair. And check out that newel post. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Another view of that stunning staircase balustrade.

A better view of the stunning staircase balustrade. Those shallow blocks at the top of each spindle give it a real prairie-style look, and add to its majesty and elegance. I was captivated by this design. I may be in love with this house. Actually, I think I am. The design of these little bonus architectural elements is so simple, and yet also beautiful. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Staircase

Another view of that balustrade. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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usptars

There are some houses that "only a mother could love," but this house really is a shining jewel. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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upstairs

A peek into the upstairs bedroom (on the home's front). Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Better view

Close-up on those windows (looking out at the street). Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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house

Original windows (and hardware) on the side of the house (2nd floor). Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Bathroom

And even the bathroom is in vintage condition! Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Close-up of bathroom floor tile.

I suppose I could have picked up that bit of debris on the floor, but still, it's a great shot of that floor tile, isn't it? Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Even the bathroom has beautiful windows!

Even the bathroom has beautiful windows and original cabinetry. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Kitchen cabinets

Kitchen cabinets are also original. The floor is not. :) In the 1980s, I lived in a house in Portsmouth, Virginia with that same floor tile. That's an old floor! Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Beautifl hardware

Close-up of the beautiful drawer pulls. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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Exterior

I thought traveling to Oklahoma in November would keep me safe from the snow. I was wrong. Nonetheless, made for a nice picture of the home's exterior. Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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What a house!

Oh little brick bungalow, you really do have a "most unusual combination of values." I do love you so! Photo is copyright 2014 Rachel Shoemaker and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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To visit Rachel’s website, click here.

To read more about Wardway, click here.

Peace Pipes and Fourplexes: The Calumet

October 24th, 2014 Sears Homes No comments

The Calumet is a rare Sears kit house that was offered for a brief time in the late 1910s and early 1920s. Sears did offer a few apartment buildings (yes, as kits), and the Calumet was one of them. My favorite feature of the Sears Calumet is the wall-bed, and the Calumet had two wall beds per unit.

The bed frame was included in the kit (but not the mattress).

It’s also interesting to note that the word Calumet comes from the Latin word calamellus, meaning “little reed.”  According to my online dictionary, a calumet is a “ceremonial smoking pipe, traditionally smoked to seal a covenant or treaty, or to offer prayers in a religious ceremony.”

Next time you’re watching TV with your friends and an Indian starts smoking a peace pipe, you can exclaim, “Why, he’s smoking a calumet!”

They’ll be so impressed with your esoteric knowledge!

Want to learn more about Murphy Beds (Wall Beds)? Click here!

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The Calumet, as seen in the 1918 catalog.

I just love the math: 20 rooms in 12! How do they do it? :)

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The Calumet, as seen on Wikipedia.

The Calumet, as seen on Wikipedia.

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Bs

The Calumets had four porches, each with their own coal bin, whichwas nothing more than a small bin. Not nearly as luxurious as it sounds. Plus, it has "handy closets." I wonder which model had the "unhandy closets"?

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That would have been a heck of a kit house!

That would have been a heck of a kit house!

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Bloomintong

Notice that the wall beds have their own windows - in a closet!

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The Calumet - as seen in the 1918 catalog.

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The only Calumet Ive ever seen - and its in Bloomington, IL.

The only Calumet I've ever seen - and it's in Bloomington, IL. You can see those two "closet-bed windows" on the right side. Sadly, the second-story porches are long gone. That first step outside of those 2nd floor doors is a doozy!

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Do you think that the wallbed in the Calumet *ever* looked as good as it did in this accompanying image? I kinda doubt it!

Do you think that the wallbed in the Calumet *ever* looked as good as it did in this accompanying image? I kinda doubt it!

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In another catalog promotion, Sears promises that folding up that wall bed is so easy even a child can do it.

In another catalog promotion, Sears promises that folding up that wall bed is so easy even a child can do it.

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In the silent short film (1:00 a.m.), Charlie Chaplin does battle with a recalcitrant wall bed (also known as a murphy bed).

In the silent short film (title, "1:00 a.m."), Charlie Chaplin does battle with a recalcitrant wall bed (also known as a murphy bed). The full video (about 10 minutes) is at youtube. See link below.

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To see the Charlie Chaplin short, click here.

To read another fascinating blog, click here.

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Schadenfreude or Mudita?

August 9th, 2013 Sears Homes No comments

The Germans call it schadenfreude.  Here in Virginia, we call it “The Crab Theory.”

Schadenfreude means - quite literally - delighting in the misfortune of others. I came across this wonderful word when I was writing my book, The Ugly Woman’s Guide to Internet Dating: What I Learned From 70 First Dates.

If you put one crab in a five-gallon bucket, that lone crab will do everything in his power to crawl out of that bucket. But, if you place two or more crabs in one bucket, the other crabs will grab anyone who tries to get out, and pull him back down.

Unfortunately, humans sometime act a lot like crabs.

In my own life, I’ve struggled mightily with envy, and sometimes, I’ve leaned more toward the schadenfreude side.

And then one day, I read a story in the Christian Science Sentinel about a woman who’d spent a lifetime cultivating the habit of gratitude. The article said that her mother had set a wonderful example, teaching her to feel sincerely joyous and grateful for the good things that happened in other people’s lives. This wise mother had taught her little girl that when good things happened to others, it could be viewed as a personal promise from God that, if it happened for them, it could happen for her, too.

The Buddhist call this Mudita. It’s the habit of finding joy in other people’s happiness.

The morning news is frequently awash in salacious and scurrilous scandals involving celebrities and their ilk. Somehow it seems like it’s just human nature to want to “read all about it” when a wealthy, gorgeous and famous celebrity has something crummy happen in their lives.

Yet it’s in our divine nature to flip that around and stop staring so hard at other people’s sins and take a better look at our own shortcomings.. Maybe we need to stop cultivating the habit of schadenfreude and work on mudita.

To read more, click here.

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Back

Back in the day, seems like society worked harder on cultivating the habit of gratitude. Perhaps it was because life was so difficult, that any opportunity to find a spot of joy - in your life or anyone else's life - was readily seized upon. By the way, this is a picture of my relatives (found amongst my late father's possessions), but I don't know who these folks are. I suspect it's a picture of Homer Hoyt's parents. Homer was my great, great grandfather.

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To read more about Sears Homes, click here.

To read about the Sears Magnolia, click here.

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