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Posts Tagged ‘wood river sears homes’

Quite Possibly, The Most Beautiful Elsmore in the World

December 10th, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

The Elsmore was a hugely popular house for Sears, and it was probably one of their top five best selling models.

Since all sales records were destroyed during a post-WW2 corporate housecleaning at Sears, it’s hard to know for sure, but I do know that I’ve seen a whole lot of Elsmores in my travels.

Earlier this year, I posted another blog on the Elsmore (click here to see that), but I was inspired to post a second blog, due to this home’s incredible popularity and also because Cindy Catanzaro found and photographed one of the prettiest (and most well-cared-for) Elsmores that I’ve ever seen.

To read more on the Elsmore, click here.

Refinement and Comfort here.  How elegant sounding!

"Refinement and Comfort here." Sounds lovely!!

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Heres an Elsmore that was built in Cairo, IL not far from the spot where Sears had their 40-acre mill.

Here's an Elsmore that was built in Cairo, IL not far from the spot where Sears had their 40-acre lumber mill. This Elsmore, built at 1501 Commerce Avenue, was torn down pre-2001. I visited Cairo then and went looking for this house, but 1501 Commerce was an empty lot at that point. How many Sears Homes in Cairo have been razed? It's a vexing question.

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Another vintage Elsmore.

Another vintage Elsmore. This one was in Glenshaw, PA (1919 catalog).

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This is one of my favorite Elsmores. Its in Park Ridge, Illiois. Picture perfect in every way. Photo is copyright 2010, Dale Patrick Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

This is one of my favorite Elsmores. It's in Park Ridge, Illinois. Picture perfect in every way. Photo is copyright 2010, Dale Patrick Wolicki and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

Visit Dale’s website by clicking here.

And the crème de la crème

And the crème de la crème. Cindy Catazaro found this house in Oakwood Ohio and it has been lovingly and faithfully restored. The house has obviously had some "renovations," but they've been done in a thoughtful, sensitive manner. I'm so impressed to know that there are people in the world who love their Sears House *this* much! Photo is copyright 2012, Cindy Catazaro and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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An mini-Elsmore? It might be a trick of the eye, but it appears this Elsmore in Walnutport, PA is a little narrower than the catalog version.

An skinny mini-Elsmore? It might be a trick of the eye, but it appears this Elsmore in Walnutport, PA is a little narrower than the catalog version. The window arrangement is also a little different. I'd love to know the history behind this house. Photo is copyright 2012 Angela Laury and may not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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The Elsmore, as it appeared in the later 1910s and 20s was actually a remodel of this

The Elsmore, as it appeared in the later 1910s and 20s was actually a remodel of Modern Home #126, which was first offered in the 1908 (first) Sears Modern Homes catalog.

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If you compare the two floorplans, youll see how similar they really are.

If you compare the two floorplans, you'll see how similar they are. This is the floorplan for the Sears Modern Home #126 (1908). Notice the size of the rooms and placement of windows.

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Floor

And here's the floorplan for the Elsmore (1916). The chamfered corners are gone and the front porch is different, but the rest of the house is the same, down to window placement and room size. The front porch roof on Modern Home #126 (with cantilevers) *always* sagged due to its fantastic weight. Not a good design. The changes to the Elsmore porch fixed that problem.

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Thanks to Cindy Catazaro and Dale Wolicki for providing such beautiful photos!

To read more about the Elsmore, click here.

To visit Dale’s website, click here.

Did you enjoy this blog? Please take a moment and leave a nice comment below. I’m living on nothing but love.

:)

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The Elsmore: Refinement and Comfort

May 3rd, 2012 Sears Homes 3 comments

If you only learn to identify five Sears Homes, one of them should be the Elsmore. It was a perennial favorite amongst kit home buyers, and for good reason. It was offered in two floor plans and both had several nice features, including spacious rooms, a living room fireplace, a kitchen that overlooked the back yard, and a super-sized front porch. It was attractive house with a smart floor plan.

In 1919, the 1,100-square-foot home sold for a mere $1,528 - a solid value. There was a little bit of extra room in the attic too, if someone was willing to do some work to transform the second story into living space. In some cases, people added dormers to the massive hipped roof to add a window or two.

The 1919 catalog page (shown below) promised “Refinement and Comfort Here.” The Sears catalog was famous for its puffery, but in this case, the promises made about the Elsmore were probably pretty accurate.

Want to read more about the history of the Elsmore? Click here

To order a copy of Rose’s newest book, click here.

Elsmore, as seen in the 1921 catalog.

Elsmore, as seen in the 1921 catalog.

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The 1924 catalog testimonial

This testimonial - written by Mr. DeHaven of Glenshaw, PA appeared in the 1924 catalog. It would be fun to find this house today.

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Elsmore in Cairo (now gone) 1921

This Elsmore was built at 1501 Commercial Avenue in in Cairo, Illinois. As of 2002, there was nothing but a vacant lot at that site. Mr. Fitzjearls house is long gone. Sears had a 40-acre mill in Cairo and there are many Sears Homes throughout Cairo, but not a single Elsmore.

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1921 houses

Mr. Fitzjearl built an Elsmore at 1501 Commercial Avenue.

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Sears Elsmore in Bedford, VA

Sears Elsmore in Bedford, VA (near Roanoke).

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Sears Elsmore as een in 1916

In the 1916 catalog, the Elsmore sold for a mere $937.

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Park Ridge, Il Dale

Dale Wolicki found this Elsmore in Park Ridge, Illinois. This house gets my vote for the most perfect Elsmore in America. Original windows, doors, siding and railings. Just amazing. Photo is courtesy of Dale Patrick Wolicki and can not be used or reproduced without written permission.

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One of the most perfect Elsmores in the world is in Elgin, IL.

The second most perfect Elsmore in the world is in Elgin, IL. Notice the original railing!

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Elsmore in Benld

This Elsmore has had a lot of "remodeling" but it still retains some original Elsmore features, such as the lone sash in the front porch attic. It's located in Benld, IL.

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Clifton Forge

This Elsmore is in Clifton Forge, Virginia.

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Sears Elsmore suffolk

This Elsmore is in downtown Suffolk.

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Mounds, Illinois is very close to Cairo, which was home to a massive 40-acre Sears Mill in the 1920s and 30s. Not surprisingly, there are many Sears Homes throughout this area.

Mounds, Illinois is very close to Cairo, which was home to a massive 40-acre Sears Mill in the 1920s and 30s. Not surprisingly, there are many Sears Homes throughout this area.

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Theres an abundance of Sears Homes in Takoma Park (DC area) too.

There's an abundance of Sears Homes in Takoma Park (DC area) too. Someone added a couple double-hung windows to the porch attic and turned it into living space.

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Colonail Heiths

This Elsmore is somewhere in Virginia. Wow. Just wow. And not a good wow.

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floor plan

These Elsmore was offered in this lone floor plan until the early 1920s when a second floor plan was offered.

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The Elsmore came in two floor plans

The second floor plan had the same footprint, but the interior was very different, and it had a pair of windows in the dining room. If you scroll back up and look at these houses, you'll see most of them are "Floor plan #13192."*

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beauty 1919

The Elsmore as it appeared in 1921.

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Photo from Dale

Side by side comparison of the Elsmore in the catalog (left) and real life (right).

To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

To learn about Wardway Homes, click here.

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Wood River and Their Sears Homes

February 13th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

Thanks to Standard Oil (later known as Amoco, and later known as BP), Wood River, Illinois has 23 pretty little Sears Homes lined up on 9th Street (near downtown).  Standard Oil moved into Wood River in 1908, and in 1918, Standard Oil decided to build houses for their workers. In the early years of the 20th Century, this was common practice among the better businesses of the time.

To learn more about the history of Standard Oil and Sears Homes, click here.

To see pretty pictures of Sears Homes in Wood River (then and now), scroll down.

Vintage photo from the 1920 Stanolind Record showing the newly built Sears Homes in Wood River.

Vintage photo from the 1920 Stanolind Record showing the newly built Sears Homes in Wood River. The first house is the Sears Roanoke, followed by the Whitehall, and then the Gladstone, and then the Madelia, and then the Carlin. The Stanolind Record was an employee newsletter of Standard Oil.

Sears Homes in Wood River, as seen in February 2010.

Sears Homes in Wood River, as seen in February 2010.

Sears Whitehall

Sears Whitehall

This Sears Whitehall is in pretty good condition, and still looks much like the original catalog paage. This is on 9th Street in Wood River.

This Sears Whitehall is in pretty good condition, and still looks much like the original catalog paage. This is on 9th Street in Wood River.

Gladstone/Langston

The Langston was also known as the Gladstone. There's virtually no difference between the Sears Gladstone and the Langston.

Heres  the Gladstone/Langston as seen in 2010.

Here's the Gladstone/Langston as seen in 2010. That center downspout is a little funky looking.

The Sears Roanoke

The Sears Roanoke

This Sears Roanoke is missing its wooden awning over the 2nd floor windows, but after 80 years, thats a common problem.

This Sears Roanoke is missing its wooden awning over the 2nd floor windows, but after 90 years, that's a common problem.

Sears Madelia from the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

Sears Carlin from the 1919 Sears Modern Homes catalog.

One of several Sears Carlins on 9th Street in Wood River

One of several Sears Carlins on 9th Street in Wood River

Madelia

Madelia

Sears Madelia

Sears Madelia

Sears Elsmore as seen in the 1923 catalog

Sears Elsmore as seen in the 1923 catalog

An Elsmore in Wood River. Rather beige, but thats ok.

An Elsmore in Wood River. Rather beige, but that's ok.

Fullerton from the 1925 catalog

Fullerton from the 1925 catalog

Theres only one Fullerton in Wood River, and its pink!  :)

There's only one Fullerton in Wood River, and it's pink! :)

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Standard Oil's Sears Homes in Wood River

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Sears Homes on 9th Street in Wood River, Illinois

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Rear cover of 1925 Sears Modern Homes catalog

house 7Close up of letter from Standard Oil

To learn more about the Sears Homes in Carlinville, click here.

To buy Rose’s book, click here.

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The Lady on Horseback

January 22nd, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

In 1918, Standard Oil of Indiana made mail-order history when they placed a $1 million order with Sears Roebuck & Company for 192 Honor-Bilt homes. It was purported to be the largest order in the history of the Sears Modern Homes department. Standard Oil purchased the houses for their workers in Carlinville, Wood River and Schoper in Southwestern Illinois. Of those 192 houses, 156 went to Carlinville, 12 were built in Schoper and 24 were sent to Wood River.

These houses were built for the coal miners and refinery workers employed by Standard Oil.

Thee best part of the story is, Standard Oil hired a woman to supervise the construction of these 192 houses.  She was known as “The Lady on Horseback”  and her name was Elizabeth Spaulding. According to an article which appeared in the 1967 Illinois State Journal, Ms. Spaulding would ride her horse from house to house, keeping a close eye on the workmen. She kept the construction workers on their toes. Men she’d hired in the early morning were sometimes fired by noon (from the article, “Dear Sirs; Please Send Me 156 Houses”).

On April 23, 1919, The Carlinville Democrat printed a piece which said that the houses in Standard Addition to Carlinville were now ready for occupancy. “Prospective purchasers apply to Charles Fitzgerald, Office of Standard Oil Company (Indiana) corner High and Rice Streets.”

To  learn more about the Sears Homes in Carlinville, click here.

To buy Rose’s newest book, click here.

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Photo of Carlinville's Standard Addition, showing houses in various stages of construction.

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Vintage photo of Sears Homes in Carlinville soon after construction was completed.

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Another vintage photo from Standard Addition, about 1920.

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Standard Oil's Sears Homes in Wood River

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Sears Homes on 9th Street in Wood River, Illinois

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Rear cover of 1925 Sears Modern Homes catalog

house 7Close up of letter from Standard Oil

To  learn more about the Sears Homes in Carlinville, click here.

To buy Rose’s newest book, click here.

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Shocking Wheat and Dirty Smut and Standard Addition

January 15th, 2011 Sears Homes No comments

In 1918, Standard Oil of Indiana made mail-order history when they placed a $1 million order with Sears Roebuck & Company for 192 Honor-Bilt homes. It was purported to be the largest order in the history of the Sears Modern Homes department. Standard Oil purchased the houses for their refinery workers in Southwestern Illinois.

Of those 192 houses, 156 went to Carlinville, 12 were built in Schoper and 24 were sent to Wood River. Throughout the 1920s, pictures of these homes were prominently featured in the front pages of the Sears Modern Homes catalogs.

Construction of the 156 houses took nine months, not six as expected. The reason? A nationwide shortage of wheat. Charles Fitzgerald, spokesman for Standard Oil and Manager of Houses explained to The Chicago Daily Tribune (November 3, 1919) what happened.

“The company (Standard Oil) purchased a forty acre wheat field and the government would not permit the destruction of the crop,” he said. “On the first home, we were erecting the studding while the harvesters were shocking wheat twenty yards away.”

According to the papers of the day, “smut” was another reason for the wheat shortage. When I first read about smut and the wheat shortage, I imagined a large group of idle field workers, sitting cross-legged in the expansive fields, poring over magazines with pictures of scantily-clad women.

Smut is a particularly nasty fungus that creates black, odious spores and ruins wheat crops. In 1919, smut damaged a large proportion of America’s wheat fields.

And “shocking” was another interesting term. As a city girl, I’d never heard that phrase before. “Wheat shockers” are the field workers who bundle up the wheat.

While doing research for my book The Houses that Sears Built, I read hundreds of newspaper and articles from the early 1900s and learned that there is a wholly different vernacular for that time period. Words have different meaning in different times.

One of the Sears Homes in Wood River, Illinois - part of that $1 million order that Standard Oil    placed  in the late 1910s. There are 24 of these Sears Homes in a row on 9th Street in Wood River. The 12 Sears Homes built in Schoper, Illinois were torn down in the 1930s.

Pictured above is a Sears Madelia, one of the Sears Homes in Wood River, Illinois - part of that $1 million order that Standard Oil placed in the late 1910s. There were 24 of Sears Homes in a row on 9th Street in Wood River, and one was torn down to make way for a street widening. The 12 Sears Homes built in Schoper, Illinois were torn down in the 1930s, and the 152 in Carlinville still remain, but many are in poor condition.

Another Sears Madelia, and this one is in Carlinville

Another Sears Madelia, and this one is in Carlinville

Carlinville, IL

Carlinville, IL

Sears Madelia in Carlinville

Sears Madelia in Carlinville

Madelia in Carlinville

Madelia in Carlinville

Carlinville

Carlinville

Carlinville

Carlinville

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Vintage photo from Standard Addition, about 1920.

To learn more about the Sears Homes of Illinois, click here.

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To learn more about Sears Homes, click here.

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